Robert A Owens DDK-827 - History

Robert A Owens DDK-827 - History


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Robert A. Owens

(DDK-827: dp. 2,420,1. 391', b. 41'; dr. 19', s. 35 k.; epl. 309;

a. 4 3", 8 20mm., 2 dct. 4 dcp., 1 dcp. (hh.), 2 rock. launch., 4 21" tt.; cl. Carpenter; Robert A. Owens (DD-827) was laid down 29 October 1945 by the Bath Iron Works Corp., Bath, Maine; launched 15 July 1946; sponsored by Miss Patricia Hannegan; reclassified DDK-827 on 28 January 1948; and commissioned at Boston 5 November 1949, Comdr. Rexford V. Wheeler, Jr., in command.

Following shakedown in February 1950, Robert A. Oweru, one of the first hunter-killer destroyers so designated, was reclassified DDE-827 on 4 March 1950. She operated in the western Atlantic and the Caribbean until late 1952 when she deployed to the Mediterranean. From that time into the 1960's, she operated with the 6th Fleet for 6 months out of every 18. During the remaining 12 months, she conducted antisubmarine patrols off the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean. In the fall of 1957 she added the North Sea to her operational area as she joined in NATO exercises.

In the 1960's Robert A. Owens continued to rotate between 2d and 6th Fleets. In November 1960 and February 1962, she assisted in the recovery operations for Projeet Mereury space capsules, Mereury 2 and Mereury 6. After the latter, Robert A. Owens sailed east to join TG Bravo for eastern Atlantic antisubmarine operations. Reclassified DD-827 on 7 August 1962, she was a unit of the Cuban Quarantine Task Force 136 during October and November. In January and February 1963, she conducted ASW operations in the Atlantic. March brought another period of patrol off Cuba; and, in April, Robert A. Owens again got underway for extended deployment. Duty in the Mediterranean, the Red Sea, and the Indian Oeean followed and on 23 December she entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization overhaul.

Completing overhaul on 15 November 1964, Robert A. Ou.er~ served as schoolship for the Fleet Sonar School and, after refresher training at Guantanamo Bay, joined the Recovery Force for Gemini-Titan (GT3) in March 1965 and GeminiTitan (GT4) in June. On 27 November, she sailed for an extended deployment to the 6th Fleet and Middle East Force, returning to Fleet Sonar School ship duty in May 1966. She then operated in the Atlantic until deploying to the Mediterranean during the first 5 months of 1967. The balance of the year was spent in Atlantic operations, schoolship duties, and overhaul which was completed 11 March 1968.

Robert A. Owens then participated in the search for Scorpion 28 May to 13 June, and conducted ASW operations before deploying to the 6th Fleet from 5 September 1968 to 27 January 1969. She then operated in the Atlantic and Caribbean without an extended deployment for the balance of that vear. Between 1 January 1970 and 31 December 1972, she has alternated two Mediterranean deployments with normal operations in the Atlantic and Caribbean, out of her home port, Norfolk. The year 1973 has been taken up completely by Atlantic and Caribbean operations, as of January 1974, she is in port at Norfolk.


Robert A Owens DDK-827 - History

A Tin Can Sailors
Destroyer History

USS ROBERT A. OWENS
(DD-827)

Throughout the 1960s the OWENS continued to rotate between the Second and Sixth Fleets. In 1960 and 1962, she assisted in the recovery operations for the space capsules Mercury 2 and Mercury 6. Following antisubmarine operations along the East Coast, she was again reclassified, this time as DD�, on 7 August 1962. That October and November saw her operating as a unit of Cuban Quarantine Task Force 136 during the Soviet missile crisis. In 1963, following ASW operations in the Atlantic and another patrol off Cuba, the OWENS got underway for an extended deployment to the Mediterranean, the Red Sea, and the Indian Ocean. She began her FRAM overhaul that December of 1963 at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard and completed it the following November.

The OWENS subsequently served as school ship for the fleet sonar school and, after refresher training at Guantanamo Bay, joined the recovery force for Gemini‑Titan (GT3) in March and Gemini‑Titan (GT4) in June 1965. An extended deployment with the Sixth Fleet and the Middle East Force took her into May 1966 when she returned to duty as fleet sonar school ship. She then operated in the Atlantic until deploying to the Mediterranean for the first five months of 1967. The OWENS was occupied for the rest of the year with East Coast operations, school ship duties, and an overhaul, which was completed in March 1968.

From The Tin Can Sailor, January 2009


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Robert A Owens DDK-827 - History

USS Robert A. Owens - (DD-827)

USS Robert A. Owens (DD/DDK/DDE-827) was a Gearing-class destroyer of the United States Navy, in service from 1949 to 1982. She was then transferred to Turkey through the Security Assistance Program (SAP) and served as TCG Alcitepe (D-346). The destroyer was finally decommissioned in 1999 and scrapped.

Robert A. Owens was laid down on 29 October 1945 by the Bath Iron Works Corp., Bath, Maine launched on 15 July 1946 sponsored by Miss Patricia Hannegan reclassified DDK-827 on 28 January 1948 and commissioned at Boston on 5 November 1949, Commander Rexford V. Wheeler, Jr., in command. She was named for United States Marine Corps Sergeant Robert A. Owens (1920–1943), who was awarded both the Navy Cross and Medal of Honor posthumously for his heroic actions in the Battle of Empress Augusta Bay.

Following shakedown in February 1950, Robert A. Owens, one of the first hunter-killer destroyers so designated, was reclassified DDE-827 on 4 March 1950. She operated in the western Atlantic and the Caribbean (during which time she sank U-2513 west of Key West, Florida during rocket tests on 7 October 1951) and in late 1952 when she deployed to the Mediterranean. From that time into the 1960s, she operated with the 6th Fleet for six months out of every eighteen. During the remaining twelve months, she conducted anti-submarine patrols off the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean. In the fall of 1957 she added the North Sea to her operational area as she joined in NATO exercises.

In the 1960s Robert A. Owens continued to rotate between 2nd and 6th Fleets. In November 1960 and February 1962, she assisted in the recovery operations for Project Mercury space capsules, Mercury 2 and Mercury 6. After the latter, Robert A. Owens sailed east to join Task Group Bravo (TG Bravo) for eastern Atlantic antisubmarine operations. Reclassified DD-827 on 7 August 1962, she was a unit of the Cuban Quarantine Task Force 136 during October and November. In January and February 1963, she conducted anti-submarine warfare (ASW) operations in the Atlantic. March brought another period of patrol off Cuba and, in April, Robert A. Owens again got underway for extended deployment. Duty in the Mediterranean, the Red Sea, and the Indian Ocean followed and on 23 December she entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization (FRAM) overhaul. Completing overhaul on 15 November 1964, Robert A. Owens served as schoolship for the Fleet Sonar School and, after refresher training at Guantanamo Bay, joined the Recovery Force for Gemini-Titan 3 (GT3) in March 1965 and Gemini-Titan 4 (GT4) in June. On 27 November, she sailed for an extended deployment to the 6th Fleet and Middle East Force, returning to Fleet Sonar School ship duty in May 1966. She then operated in the Atlantic until deploying to the Mediterranean during the first five months of 1967. The balance of the year was spent in Atlantic operations, schoolship duties, and overhaul which was completed on 11 March 1968.

Robert A. Owens then participated in the search for submarine Scorpion (SSN-589) from 28 May to 13 June, and conducted ASW operations before deploying to the 6th Fleet from 5 September 1968 to 27 January 1969. She then operated in the Atlantic and Caribbean without an extended deployment for the balance of that year.

Between 1 January 1970 and 31 December 1972, she alternated two Mediterranean deployments with normal operations in the Atlantic and Caribbean, out of her home port, Norfolk, Virginia. The year 1973 was taken up completely by Atlantic and Caribbean operations.

During 1976 at least, she was home ported in Galveston Texas, making a round trip to Norfolk that spring.

Between 1978 and 1981, she was assigned to the Naval Surface Reserve Force and homeported at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida, berthed adjacent to the training aircraft carrier USS Lexington. During this time the USS Owens was used to train reserve members of the Navy and Marines.

Robert A. Owens was decommissioned on 16 February 1982 and transferred to the Republic of Turkey through the Security Assistance Program (SAP) that same day. She served as TCG Alcitepe (D-346) with the Turkish Navy until early 1999 when she was decommissioned and scrapped.


USS Robert A. Owens DD-827 (1949-1982)

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Robert A Owens DDK-827 - History

Following shakedown in February 1950 Robert A. Owens one of the first hunter-killer destroyers so designated was reclassified DDE-827 on 4 March 1950. She operated in the western Atlantic and the Caribbean until late 1952 when she deployed to the Mediterranean. From that time into the 1960's she operated with the 6th Fleet for 6 months out of every 18. During the remaining 12 months she conducted antisubmarine patrols off the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean. In the fall of 1957 she added the North Sea to her operational area as she joined in NATO exercises.

In the 1960's Robert A. Owens continued to rotate between 2d and 6th Fleets. In November 1960 and February 1962 she assisted in the recovery operations for Project Mercury space capsules Mercury 2 and Mercury 6. After the latter Robert A. Owens sailed east to join TG Bravo for eastern Atlantic antisubmarine operations. Reclassified DD-827 on 7 August 1962 she was a unit of the Cuban Quarantine Task Force 136 during October and November. In January and February 1963 she conducted ASW operations in the Atlantic. March brought another period of patrol off Cuba and in April Robert A. Owens again got underway for extended deployment. Duty in the Mediterranean the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean followed and on 23 December she entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization overhaul.

Completing overhaul on 15 November 1964 Robert A. Owens served as schoolship for the Fleet Sonar School and after refresher training at Guantanamo Bay joined the Recovery Force for Gemini-Titan (GT3) in March 1965 and Gemini-Titan (GT4) in June. On 27 November she sailed for an extended deployment to the 6th Fleet and Middle East Force returning to Fleet Sonar School ship duty in May 1966. She then operated in the Atlantic until deploying to the Mediterranean during the first 5 months of 1967. The balance of the year was spent in Atlantic operations schoolship duties and overhaul which was completed 11 March 1968.

Robert A. Owens then participated in the search for Scorpion 28 May to 13 June and conducted ASW operations before deploying to the 6th Fleet from 5 September 1968 to 27 January 1969. She then operated in the Atlantic and Caribbean without an extended deployment for the balance of that year. Between 1 January 1970 and 31 December 1972 she has alternated two Mediterranean deployments with normal operations in the Atlantic and Caribbean out of her home port Norfolk. The year 1973 has been taken up completely by Atlantic and Caribbean operations as of January 1974 she is in port at Norfolk.


Contents

1950� [ edit | edit source ]

Following shakedown in February 1950, Robert A. Owens, one of the first hunter-killer destroyers so designated, was reclassified DDE-827 on 4 March 1950. She operated in the western Atlantic and the Caribbean (during which time she sank U-2513 west of Key West, Florida during rocket tests on 7 October 1951) and in late 1952 when she deployed to the Mediterranean. From that time into the 1960s, she operated with the 6th Fleet for six months out of every eighteen. During the remaining twelve months, she conducted anti-submarine patrols off the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean. In the fall of 1957 she added the North Sea to her operational area as she joined in NATO exercises.

1960� [ edit | edit source ]

In the 1960s Robert A. Owens continued to rotate between 2nd and 6th Fleets. In November 1960 and February 1962, she assisted in the recovery operations for Project Mercury space capsules, and Mercury 6. After the latter, Robert A. Owens sailed east to join Task Group Bravo (TG Bravo) for eastern Atlantic antisubmarine operations. Reclassified DD-827 on 7 August 1962, she was a unit of the Cuban Quarantine Task Force 136 during October and November. In January and February 1963, she conducted anti-submarine warfare (ASW) operations in the Atlantic. March brought another period of patrol off Cuba and, in April, Robert A. Owens again got underway for extended deployment. Duty in the Mediterranean, the Red Sea, and the Indian Ocean followed and on 23 December she entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization (FRAM) overhaul.

Completing overhaul on 15 November 1964, Robert A. Owens served as schoolship for the Fleet Sonar School and, after refresher training at Guantanamo Bay, joined the Recovery Force for Gemini-Titan 3 (GT3) in March 1965 and Gemini-Titan 4 (GT4) in June. On 27 November, she sailed for an extended deployment to the 6th Fleet and Middle East Force, returning to Fleet Sonar School ship duty in May 1966. She then operated in the Atlantic until deploying to the Mediterranean during the first five months of 1967. The balance of the year was spent in Atlantic operations, schoolship duties, and overhaul which was completed on 11 March 1968.

Robert A. Owens then participated in the search for submarine Scorpion (SSN-589) from 28 May to 13 June, and conducted ASW operations before deploying to the 6th Fleet from 5 September 1968 to 27 January 1969. She then operated in the Atlantic and Caribbean without an extended deployment for the balance of that year.

1970� [ edit | edit source ]

Between 1 January 1970 and 31 December 1972, she alternated two Mediterranean deployments with normal operations in the Atlantic and Caribbean, out of her home port, Norfolk, Virginia. The year 1973 was taken up completely by Atlantic and Caribbean operations.

During early 1977 at least, she was home ported in Galveston Texas, making a round trip to Norfolk that spring.

1978� [ edit | edit source ]

Between 1978 and 1981, she was assigned to the Naval Reserve Force and homeported at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida, berthed adjacent to the training aircraft carrier USS Lexington (AVT-16).


DD-827 Robert A Owens

Robert A. Owens (DD-827) was laid down 29 October 1945 by the Bath Iron Works Corp., Bath, Maine launched 15 July 1946 sponsored by Miss Patricia Hannegan reclassified DDK-827 on 28 January 1948 and commissioned at Boston 5 November 1949, Comdr. Rexford V. Wheeler, Jr., in command.

Following shakedown in February 1950, Robert A. Owens, one of the first hunter-killer destroyers so designated, was reclassified DDE-827 on 4 March 1950. She operated in the western Atlantic and the Caribbean until late 1952 when she deployed to the Mediterranean. From that time into the 1960's, she operated with the 6th Fleet for 6 months out of every 18. During the remaining 12 months, she conducted antisubmarine patrols off the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean. In the fall of 1957 she added the North Sea to her operational area as she joined in NATO exercises.

In the 1960's Robert A. Owens continued to rotate between 2d and 6th Fleets. In November 1960 and February 1962, she assisted in the recovery operations for Project Mercury space capsules, Mercury 2 and Mercury 6. After the latter, Robert A. Owens sailed east to join TG Bravo for eastern Atlantic antisubmarine operations. Reclassified DD-827 on 7 August 1962, she was a unit of the Cuban Quarantine Task Force 136 during October and November. In January and February 1963, she conducted ASW operations in the Atlantic. March brought another period of patrol off Cuba and, in April, Robert A. Owens again got underway for extended deployment. Duty in the Mediterranean, the Red Sea, and the Indian Ocean followed and on 23 December she entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization overhaul.

Completing overhaul on 15 November 1964, Robert A. Owens served as schoolship for the Fleet Sonar School and, after refresher training at Guantanamo Bay, joined the Recovery Force for Gemini-Titan (GT3) in March 1965 and Gemini-Titan (GT4) in June. On 27 November, she sailed for an extended deployment to the 6th Fleet and Middle East Force, returning to Fleet Sonar School ship duty in May 1966. She then operated in the Atlantic until deploying to the Mediterranean during the first 5 months of 1967. The balance of the year was spent in Atlantic operations, schoolship duties, and overhaul which was completed 11 March 1968.

Robert A. Owens then participated in the search for Scorpion 28 May to 13 June, and conducted ASW operations before deploying to the 6th Fleet from 5 September 1968 to 27 January 1969. She then operated in the Atlantic and Caribbean without an extended deployment for the balance of that year. Between 1 January 1970 and 31 December 1972, she has alternated two Mediterranean deployments with normal operations in the Atlantic and Caribbean, out of her home port, Norfolk. The year 1973 has been taken up completely by Atlantic and Caribbean operations, as of January 1974, she was in port at Norfolk.

Decommissioned in early 1982, prior to being loaned to Turkey, 22 February 1982. She was renamed Alcitepe. Stricken from the USN list 6 August 1987 and sold to Turkey, she was still active in the Turkish Navy as of 1998.


Mục lục

Robert A. Owens được đặt lườn tại xưởng tàu của hãng Bath Iron Works Corp. ở Bath, Maine vào ngày 29 tháng 10 năm 1945. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 15 tháng 7 năm 1946 được đỡ đầu bởi cô Patricia Hannegan. Việc hoàn tất con tàu bị tạm dừng một thời gian cho đến khi nó được xếp lại lớp như một tàu khu trục chống ngầm mang ký hiệu lườn DDK-827 vào ngày 28 tháng 1 năm 1948, và được cho nhập biên chế tại Xưởng hải quân Boston vào ngày 5 tháng 11 năm 1949 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Trung tá Hải quân Rexford V. Wheeler, Jr. [1]

1950 - 1959 Sửa đổi

Sau khi hoàn tất việc chạy thử máy huấn luyện trong tháng 2 năm 1950, Robert A. Owens được xếp lại lớp như một tàu khu trục hộ tống với ký hiệu lườn mới DDE-827 vào ngày 4 tháng 3 năm 1950. Nó hoạt động tại khu vực dọc theo bờ biển Đại Tây Dương và vùng biển Caribe và trong một cuộc tập trận ngoài khơi Key West, Florida vào ngày 7 tháng 10 năm 1951, nó đã đánh chìm bằng rocket mục tiêu nguyên là chiếc tàu ngầm U-boat Đức U-2513. [1]

Vào cuối năm 1952, Robert A. Owens được phái sang hoạt động cùng Đệ Lục hạm đội tại Địa Trung Hải và từ đó cho đến đầu thập niên 1960, nó được phái sang Châu Âu theo tần suất từng đợt sáu tháng cho mỗi giai đoạn 18 tháng. Trong thời gian 12 tháng ở lại lục địa Hoa Kỳ, nó tuần tra chống tàu ngầm dọc theo vùng bờ Đông và vùng biển Caribe. Riêng vào mùa Thu năm 1957, con tàu đi đến Bắc Hải để tập trận phối hợp cùng hải quân các nước thành viên Khối NATO. [1]

1960 - 1969 Sửa đổi

Trong những năm 1960, tiếp tục luân phiên các lượt hoạt động giữa Đệ Nhị hạm đội và Đệ Lục hạm đội. Con tàu đã hai lần tham gia vào Chương trình Mercury, khi phục vụ vào việc thu hồi tàu không gian Mercury 2 vào tháng 11 năm 1960 và tàu Friendship 7 vào tháng 2 năm 1962. Sau đó nó gia nhập Đội đặc nhiệm Bravo để tham gia các hoạt động chống tàu ngầm tại khu vực Đông Đại Tây Dương. Nó được xếp lớp trở lại và mang ký hiệu lườn cũ DD-827 vào ngày 7 tháng 8 năm 1962, và đã tham gia vào Lực lượng đặc nhiệm 136, lực lượng hải quân phong tỏa vùng biển Cuba trong vụ Khủng hoảng tên lửa Cuba vào tháng 10 và tháng 11 năm đó. Trong tháng 1 và tháng 2 năm 1963, nó tiếp tục hoạt động tuần tra chống tàu ngầm tại Đại Tây Dương rồi sang tháng 3 lại có một đợt tuần tra khác tại khu vực Cuba. Chiếc tàu khu trục khởi hành vào tháng 4 cho một đợt hoạt động lâu dài ở nước ngoài, hoạt động tại Địa Trung Hải, Hồng Hải và Ấn Độ Dương trước khi quay trở về nhà. [1]

Vào ngày 23 tháng 12 năm 1963, Robert A. Owens đi vào Xưởng hải quân Norfolk cho một đợt nâng cấp kéo dài 10 tháng trong khuôn khổ Chương trình Hồi sinh và Hiện đại hóa Hạm đội (FRAM: Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization), nơi nó được sửa chữa và nâng cấp để kéo dài vòng đời hoạt động. Nó cũng được bổ sung những vũ khí chống ngầm mới: tên lửa RUR-5 ASROC và máy bay trực thăng không người lái Gyrodyne QH-50 DASH, cùng hầm chứa máy bay trực thăng và sàn đáp để nâng cao năng lực chống ngầm của con tàu. [1]

Hoàn tất việc tái trang bị vào ngày 15 tháng 11 năm 1964, Robert A. Owens đã phục vụ như tàu huấn luyện cho Trường Sonar Hạm đội, và sau một lượt huấn luyện ôn tập tại vịnh Guantánamo, Cuba, nó lại tham gia vào Chương trình Gemini khi phục vụ vào việc thu hồi các tàu không gian Gemini-Titan 3 vào tháng 3 năm 1965 và Gemini-Titan 4 vào tháng 6. Đến ngày 27 tháng 11, nó lại khởi hành cho một lượt phục vụ khác cùng Đệ Lục hạm đội và Lực lượng Trung Đông, rồi quay trở lại hoạt động cùng Trường Sonar Hạm đội vào tháng 5 năm 1966. Sau đó nó hoạt động thường lệ tại vùng bờ Đông cho đến khi được phái sang Địa Trung Hải trong những tháng đầu năm 1967. Trong thời gian còn lại của năm đó, nó hoạt động như tàu huấn luyện cùng những hoạt động thường lệ, rồi trải qua một đợt đại tu vốn hoàn tất vào ngày 11 tháng 3 năm 1968. [1]

Sau đó từ ngày 28 tháng 5 đến ngày 13 tháng 6, Robert A. Owens tham gia hoạt động tìm kiếm chiếc tàu ngầm Scorpion (SSN-589) bị mất tích tại vùng biển Đại Tây Dương, rồi sau đó hoạt động thực tập chống tàu ngầm trước khi được điều động sang phục vụ cùng Đệ Lục hạm đội tại Địa Trung Hải từ ngày 5 tháng 9, 1968 đến ngày 27 tháng 1, 1969. Sau khi quay trở về Hoa Kỳ, nó tiếp tục hoạt động tại vùng bờ biển Đại Tây Dương và vùng biển Caribe cho đến hết năm 1969. [1]

1970 - 1981 Sửa đổi

Từ ngày 1 tháng 1, 1970 đến ngày 31 tháng 12, 1972, Robert A. Owens đã hai lần được phái sang phục vụ tại Địa Trung Hải, và xen kẻ giữa những thời gian đó là những hoạt động tại vùng bờ biển Đại Tây Dương và vùng biển Caribe, đặt cảng nhà tại Norfolk, Virginia. Đến năm 1976, con tàu chuyển cảng nhà đến Galveston, Texas. [1]

Từ năm 1978 đến năm 1981, Robert A. Owens được điều động sang thành phần Hải quân Dự bị Hoa Kỳ, đặt cảng nhà tại Pensacola, Florida và neo đậu cạnh tàu sân bay huấn luyện USS Lexington(AVT-16). Trong giai đoạn này con tàu được sử dụng vào vai trò huấn luyện nhân sự Hải quân và Thủy quân Lục chiến. Nó cũng từng thực hiện những chuyến đi sang vùng Ngũ đại hồ trong hai lượt, từ tháng 6 đến tháng 8, 1978 và từ tháng 6 đến tháng 8, 1980, trong khuôn khổ những chuyến đi hàng năm vào vùng nước ngọt nhằm quảng bá việc tuyển mộ nhân sự hải quân. [2] [3]

TCG Alcitepe (D-346) Sửa đổi

Robert A. Owens được cho ngừng hoạt động vào ngày 16 tháng 2, 1982 và được chuyển cho Thổ Nhĩ Kỳ cùng ngày hôm đó trong khuôn khổ Chương trình Hỗ trợ An ninh (SAP: Security Assistance Program). Nó tiếp tục phục vụ cùng Hải quân Thổ Nhĩ Kỳ như là chiếc TCG Alcitepe (D-346) cho đến đầu năm 1999, khi nó ngừng hoạt động và bị tháo dỡ. [1]


This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. The entries can be found here and here .



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