Canute Matson

Canute Matson

Canute Matson was born in Norway in 1843. He emigrated with his parents to America in 1848, and settled in Dane County, Wisconsin. Educated at Albion Academy he joined Company K, Thirteenth Wisconsin Infantry, on the outbreak of the Civil War. Promoted to the rank of sergeant in 1862 he was acting regimental quartermaster by the the time the war came to an end.

In 1868 Matson was elected clerk of the Police Court. This was followed by a series of official positions in Cook County including justice of the peace (1875), coroner (1879), deputy sheriff (1882) and in 1886 he was elected sheriff. Matson was responsible for investigating the Haymarket Bombing that resulted in the conviction of Albert Parsons, August Spies, Adolph Fisher, Louis Lingg, George Engel, Michael Schwab, Oscar Neebe and Samuel Fielden .


Ⓘ Canute Anderson. Anderson was born on April 14, 1830 in Lærdal, Norway. In 1851, he moved to Sterling, Polk County, Wisconsin. In 1854, he moved to Burnett Coun ..

Anderson was born on April 14, 1830 in Lærdal, Norway. In 1851, he moved to Sterling, Polk County, Wisconsin. In 1854, he moved to Burnett County, Wisconsin where for several years he was the lone resident in that area. He married Catherine Nelson, an immigrant from Sweden. They had twelve children. Known as the "Father of Burnett County," Anderson established Grantsburg, Wisconsin. He died on July 31, 1893 after being struck in the head by a hay pole while stacking hay.


Matson

Matson — is a surname, and may refer to: April Matson (born 1985), American actress Boyd Matson, American TV anchor Canute R. Matson, Norwegian born American politician Frank Matson (1905 – 1985), Welsh footballer Harold Matt Matson, founder of Mattel… … Wikipedia

Matson — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Aaron Matson (1770–1855), US amerikanischer Politiker April Matson (* 1985), US amerikanische Schauspielerin Courtland C. Matson (1841–1915), US amerikanischer Politiker Kristo Matson (* 1980), estnischer… … Deutsch Wikipedia

Matson Navigation Company — Inc. Type Subsidiary Industry Shipping Founded 1882 Headquarters … Wikipedia

Matson, Gloucester — Matson is a suburb in the City of Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England. History Unlike neighbouring villages, such as Brookthorpe and Upton St Leonards, Matson is not mentioned in the Domesday Book. It appears to have been a part of Kings Barton… … Wikipedia

Matson Films — Industry Film production and distribution Founded 2004 Headquarters Oakland, California, USA … Wikipedia

Matson Navigation Company — Das Verwalzungsgebäude in San Francisco Die Matson Navigation Company, kurz Matson ist eine 1882 gegründete US amerikanische Reederei aus San Francisco. Neben der Passagier und Frachtschiffahrt, hauptsächlich zwischen der US Westküste und Hawaii … Deutsch Wikipedia

Matson, Randy — ▪ American athlete byname of James Randel Matson born March 5, 1945, Kilgore, Texas, U.S. American shot putter who, in 1965, became the first man to put the shot more than 21 m, with a distance of 21.52 m (70.6 ft). Matson s weight… … Universalium

Matson, Missouri — Matson is an unincorporated community in southern St. Charles County, Missouri. It is located about three miles south of Defiance on Route 94 and near the Missouri River. Since its post office closed, its mail now comes from Defiance. It was… … Wikipedia

Gary Matson — (1949 July 1, 1999) and Winfield Mowder (1959 July 1, 1999 were a gay couple from Redding, California, who were murdered by white supremacist brothers Benjamin Matthew Williams and James Tyler Williams. The Williams brothers confessed killing the … Wikipedia

Murder of Gary Matson and Winfield Mowder — Gary Matson (1949 July 1, 1999) and Winfield Mowder (1959 July 1, 1999) were a gay couple from Redding, California, who were murdered by white supremacist brothers Benjamin Matthew Williams and James Tyler Williams. The Williams brothers… … Wikipedia


Canute Matson - History

This information on the the first millionaire lumber baron- Martin Ryerson and his family comes from the President of the Greater Muskegon Historic Association, Patricia Kay Montney. See links to other information on the Muskegon area from the Historic Assoc. at the bottom of this page. Thanks to Pat for sharing this information!


Martin Ryerson Mary A. Campau Ryerson

* These pictures are provided courtesy of Hackley Public Library. Many thanks to them for their generosity!

Here are 4 obits:
1. For Martin Ryerson the Lumber Baron.
2. Richard A. Ryerson his brother and early pioneer of Muskegon 1843,
3. Richard's son Martin Ryerson a Muskegon County Road Commissioner. 4. Richard Ryerson again son of Richard Ryerson.

Muskegon Weekly Chronicle
September 15, 1887-

Sketch of a Remarkable Career How
the Peddler of Notion Became a Millionaire Lumberman

The Chicago Tribune publishes the following biographical sketch of
Martin Ryerson:
"Martin Ryerson was born January 6, 1818, near Paterson, Passaic
county, N. J. His parents were of the pure, staunch Holland Blood, and
traced unbroken descent back to the mother country. At 16 years of age young Ryerson was an ambitious lad and made up his mind to seek his fortune in the Far West. He made his way to Detroit, and there took the position of clerk with an Indian fur trader named Trouttier. He worked for the trader two or three years and made the most of his opportunities to learn all the details of the trade with the Indians. He saw there a large profit in the business and saved his wages until he was able to start in for himself. Then with a stock of trinkets and gaudy notion such as the Indians most desired he began to tramp the State of Michigan from one end to the other. At first he sold his furs in Detroit and afterwards made his headquarters at Grand Rapids.
This extensive acquaintance with the geography of Michigan made him the best known among the Indians of any white man in the State, and fixed indelibly upon his mind the ultimate value of the pine lands. He next went to
Muskegon, and in 1839 entered the employ of Theodore Newell, who owned a small sawmill and kept a general store. After two years he purchased the
store of his employer and subsequently became owner of the sawmill. Newell
long since dead was at one time well known in Chicago, and his sons are now
residents of Kenosha, Wis. It was about 1843 that Mr. Ryerson began to
manufacture lumber on his own account. His mill was small and he did
business at first upon a very limited Scale. He steadily and rapidly extend
into partnership with Robert W. Morris, the firm name being Ryerson & Morris.
The firm prospered and in the course of a few years they owned two good size mills, one at the village of Muskegon and the other at the foot of Muskegon Lake. The partnership lasted until 1868, when Ryerson bought out Morris' interest, the latter being afflicted with an incurable disease supposed to be cancer of the stomach, and it being decided advisable to settle the partnership affairs before his death.
Meanwhile he established lumber yards at Kenosha, Wis, and Chicago.
The Chicago yard was started as early as 1846 or 1847. John M. Williams was taken into the firm at the Chicago end, and the title was Williams, Ryerson & Co. Williams retired about 1860. He is still alive, has large interests in Chicago and lives in Evanston. After his withdrawal Ryerson & Morris carried on the business here as at Muskegon. Ryerson became a permanent resident of Chicago about 1848, and has since resided here, except, during an absence of five or six years in Europe.
After his return from Europe in 1876 he began to make investments on
Chicago reality, and in the course of time became the owner of some of the
best located property in the business district. He first purchased from
James W. Scovel the southeast corner of Franklin and Madison streets, the
building occupied by H. W. King & Co., wholesale clothing. He next purchased the ground at the northeast corner of Adams street and Wabash avenue upon which he erected the large and handsome building occupied for some years by A. S. Gage & Co. He next purchase was on the east side of Wabash avenue just south of Madison street, upon which he built the splendid building occupied by S. A. Maxwell & Co. Next in order came the property upon the north side of Randolph street, east of State street, upon which he built some two years ago, the large building No 45 to 49. His last large purchase was 330 feet on Market street, extending to the river, unimproved, for which he paid $330,000. In addition to large interest in other Chicago property he has a large interest in estimated 20,000 acres of land back of Muskegon, and the value of his estate is estimated from $3,000,000 to $5,000,000. The present firm is Ryerson, Hills & Co., consisting of Martin A. Ryerson, his son, C. T. Hills of Muskegon, and H. H. Getty, the firm have no Chicago yards, and all their business is done in cargo lots from Muskegon, where they own two large mills, lumber-yards, etc.
Mr. Ryerson was twice married. His first wife, who died in 1855, was
Louisa M. Duverney, daughter of Pierre C. Duverney of Lower Canada. His
second wife was Mary A. Campau of Grand Rapids, Mich. By his first wife he had a daughter, Mrs. Charles Butts, who is now in Europe. By his second wife he had one son Martin A. Ryerson.
Some years ago Mr. Ryerson erected a monument, which stands in Lincoln Park, to his early friends, the Indians, which is one of the most conspicuous ornaments to that beautiful place."

Muskegon Weekly Chronicle
April 5, 1894-

Death of Richard Ryerson at Fremont
Sunday -- Came to Muskegon in 1843

Richard Ryerson, Sr., at 12:30 o'clock Sunday at Fremont, Newaygo
county, where he had lived many years. He was a nephew of Martin A. Ryerson and formerly lived in this city. Born at Patterson, New Jersey, February 9th 1812, he lived there until 21 years old, when he removed to western New York, thence in 1843 to Muskegon
H. H. Holt, speaking of him today said he ran logs here at first, and
also ran the Walton House, the first frame hotel erected in the then village
of Muskegon. Later his sons Martin and Richard removed to farms in Cedar
Creek township, and he went with them. Still later one of his sons settled
in Fremont, and the father went too, residing there since. He was not as
successful in accumulated wealth. The older settlers here remember him well,
and recall him as a worker during the years in which logs were delivered at
the mills for about $2 per thousand.
Other children in addition to those mentioned above are Charles
Ryerson, of Cedar Creek township Mrs. Jane R. Hepp, of this city Mrs. Marie Moths of Kenosha Wis. and Mrs. Libbie Dobs of Newark Valley,
N. Y. Mrs. E. W. Thayer of this city, is a grand-daughter.

Notes on Richard Ryerson from Pat Montney's research :
This Obituary mistakenly put Richard as the Nephew to Martin A. Ryerson. It
should have been Richard was the uncle to Martin A. Ryerson.

Richard's first wife was Sarah Ackerman. Children with Sarah: Jane Ryerson b. April 2, 1836, Maria Ryerson b February 7, 1838, Martin Ryerson b April 20, 1840, Richard Ryerson b September 30, 1846.

Richard's second wife was Marie Gadinierre. Children with Marie: Sarah Louis Ryerson b October 28, 1848, Charles D. Ryerson b November 19, 1850, Mary Ellen Ryerson b February 24, 1853, Ida J. Ryerson b September 15, 1855, Annie (no date) died as a baby, born sometime between Ida and Anna Anna Ryerson b. March 15, 1859.

Muskegon Times
August 10, 1911-

RICHARD RYERSON,
PIONEER, IS DEAD

Was Born Near Muskegon 65 Years
Ago -- Died at Home in
Fremont.

Richard Ryerson, one of the pioneers of the Muskegon Valley died at his
home in Fremont Friday, heart disease causing his death. The funeral was
Monday afternoon at Holton, interment being in the Ryerson family lot in the Holton Cemetery. Mr. Ryerson was the son of Richard Ryerson, who came to Muskegon in 1843, and he was born at the Ryerson farm at the "dam," just above Maple Island, September 30, 1846. His life was passed in this vicinity. He was the youngest of the five children by the first marriage of
Richard Ryerson, Sr. Two others of the five who survive, are Mrs. John Hepp of Muskegon and Martin Ryerson of Holton, formerly county road commissioner.
The deceased was a nephew of the late Martin Ryerson, founder of the
lumbering firm of Ryerson, Hills & Co. and whose son Martin A. Ryerson, is a prominent capitalist of Chicago.
Mrs. P. W. Thayer, who is a daughter of Mrs. Hepp attended the funeral
home by Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Jordan of Chicago, the latter a daughter of Mr.
Ryerson. They returned to Chicago Tuesday night.

Notes from Pat Montney's research :
The "dam" was an area of which the Ottawa Indians had a large settlement.
This property was owned by Martin Ryerson the Lumber Baron who married an Ottawa women as his first wife. It was 8 miles up the Muskegon River from Bridgeton Michigan.

Parents: Richard Ryerson and Sarah Ackerman

Muskegon Chronicle
June 5, 1912-

MARTIN RYERSON DIES
ON RETURN FROM TRIP

Holton Pioneer, Former Road
Commissioner, Succumbs
After Visit to Fremont.

Although in rather poor health for several months, yesterday morning
Martin Ryerson, pioneer settler and farmer of Holton and who for six years
held the position of county road commissioner attempted a trip to Fremont and on returning to Holton last night died.
Mr. Ryerson had had a severe attack of the grip lasting nearly all
winter and being a man past seventy years of age, he did not recuperate very
rapidly. Thinking that he was able to make the trip to Fremont without
exerting himself, he attempted it yesterday and on returning to Holton last
night rapidly became worse and died about 9 o'clock.
Few people are older settlers in the Holton vicinity than Mr. Ryerson
who went to that neighborhood about half a century ago. He has lived in the
village of Holton proper but a few years.
Born in Parma, N. Y., April 20, 1840. Mr. Ryerson was pas seventy-two
years of age at the time of his death. About sixty-eight years ago he came
to Michigan from New York state with his parents settling in Muskegon. After remaining here but a short time he left for Cedar Creek township where he purchased a farm on which he resided over forty years.
For six years pervious to last spring Mr. Ryerson has held the position
of county road commission and at one time was justice of peace in Cedar Creek township. He was succeeded on the board of road commissioners by John S. Walker.
Mr. Ryerson leaves, besides his widow, one son Louis M. Ryerson who
now resides on the farm and one daughter, Miss Minnie Ryerson at home. One sister, Mrs. John Hepp, also survives him.
The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at the Maccabee hall at
Holton.

Notes from Pat Montney's research :
Parents: Richard Ryerson and Sarah Ackerman. Martin was married to a Delia J. Wilson. They had two children Louise M. Ryerson b 1876 and Minnie M. Ryerson b Sept 23, 1878.

From Muskegon County Deeds Office
Liber 5 pages 489, 490, 491,492,493,494,495,496
Miscellaneous Record Will

Probate Court ) Received for record the 14th day of Dec AD
Estate of ) 1891 at 9:45 a.m.
Martin Ryerson ) Sanford H Watson Register
Deceased )

I Martin Ryerson of Chicago Illinois being of sound and disposing mind
and memory do make publish and declare this my last will and testament hereby
revoking all former wills and codicils by me at any time made.
Item First: I direct that all my just debts and funeral expenses be paid by
my executor.
Item Second: I give and bequeath to the Graceland Cemetery Company the sum of three thousand dollars but in trust however to keep the same perpetually as a
fund the income from which shall be used for the purpose of ornamenting and
keeping in good condition and repair all monuments and stones thereon.
Item Third: I give devise and bequeath to my wife Mary A Ryerson the
following real and personal property to be held and owned by her absolutely.
1st. All my pictures mosaic and other objects of art. 2nd. The sum of two
hundred thousand dollars in money or at her election in lieu thereof stocks
and bonds or other securities belonging to my estate amounting to the sum of
two hundred thousand dollars at their market value at the time of my decease.
3rd. The store property and buildings known as numbers 134 and 136 Wabash
Avenue in the City of Chicago otherwise described as follows: Lots one, two,
three and four in Carvers Subdivision of sub. Lots seven and eight in Wright &
Shermans Subdivision of Lots two and three in Block one fractional Section
fifteen addition to Chicago, Cook County Illinois together with the strip of
land ten fee in width lying between said lots one and two and appurtenances
unto said property appertaining and belonging. The bequests and devises in
this item contained to be accepted and received by my wife in lieu of dowery.
Item Fourth: I give and bequeath to my son Martin A Ryerson in trust and to
his successors in trust absolutely and in fee simple the store property and
building at the south east corner of Franklin and Madison Streets in the City
of Chicago described as the east fifty feet of Lot one in Block ninety four
School Section Addition to Chicago, Cook County Illinois, but upon the
following trusts, however. To pay the net income derived from said property
to my daughter Mary butts during her natural life for her sole and separate
use free from the control and disposition of her husband and said income
shall not be anticipated or encumbered. Upon the death of my daughter Mary
Butts, if her daughter Julia Butts shall survive her then said trustee shall
pay the net income derived from said property to said Julia Butts during her
natural life for her sole and separate use free from the control and
disposition of her husband and such income shall not be anticipated or
encumbered. Upon the death of said Julia Butts leaving children her
surviving said trustee shall convey said property absolutely to such children
living at the time of her death: the then living descendants of a deceased
child taking the parents share. If the said Julia shall predecease her
mother Mary leaving children her surviving, then said trustee shall upon the
death of my daughter convey said property absolutely to the children of said
Julia living at the death of my [page 490] said daughter Mary, the then
living descendants of a deceased child taking the parents share. But if the
said Julia leave no children or descendants of a deceased child surviving at
the time of her death to whom said property may be conveyed as herein
contemplated, the said property shall be conveyed absolutely to my person
acting for the time being as trustee in the execution of the trusts created
by this item to do any and all acts necessary for the preservation and
maintenance of the trust property with power to lease and release the same
for such times and upon such terms as they may deem best, also with power to
encumber such property by mortgage or otherwise if it shall happen to become
necessary so to do by reason of the partial or total destruction of the
building upon said premises from any cause or on account of changes which may
be necessary in said building on account of a difference in the use of the
same and generally I authorize the trustee acting in the execution of such
trust to do all acts necessary for the interest of the trust estate and to
continue the same in proper condition for the production of income. I
empower my son Martin A Ryerson to appoint by his last will a successor to
himself as trustee: and failing that such trustee shall be appointed by a
Judge of the Circuit Court of Cook County Illinois.
Item Fifth: I give and bequeath to my daughter Mary Butts the sum of fifty
thousand dollars in money.
Item Sixth: I give and bequeath to my grand child Julia Butts daughter of
Mary Butts the sum of ten thousand dollars in money.
Item Seventh: I give and bequeath to my sister Jane Gaspars an annuity of ten
thousand dollars for her sole and separate use to be paid to her by my
residuary legatee as hereinafter sated during her natural life in equal
quarterly installments.
Item Eighth: I give and bequeath to my brother George Ryerson an annuity of
one thousand dollars to be paid to him by my residuary legatee as hereinafter
sated during his natural life in equal quarterly installments.
Item Ninth: I give and bequeath to my niece Agnes Gaspar an annuity of one
thousand dollars to be paid to her by my residuary legatee as herein after
stated during each year of her natural life in equal quarterly installments
for her sole and separate use.
Item Tenth: I give and bequeath to my sister Mary Buell an annuity of five
hundred dollars for her sole and separate use to be paid to her by my
residuary legatee as hereinafter sated during each year of her natural life
in equal quarterly installments.
Item Eleventh: The annuities hereinfor provided for shall take effect from
the date of my decease and the first payment shall be made by my residuary
legatee, three months thereafter and thence forward each three months during
the lives of the annuitants.
Item: Twelfth: All the rest residue and remainder of my property of every
nature and description whatso ever, I give devise and bequeath to my son
Martin A Ryerson absolutely and in fee simple to himself and his heirs and
assigns forever subject only to payments to be made by him of the several
annuities therefor provided for but, I expressly direct [page 491] and
declare as my will that said several annuities shall not nor shall any of
them be held or construed nor are they intended to be liens or encumbrances
or charges upon the residuary estate or any portion thereof her devised and
bequeathed to my son, nor in cas of a sale or transfer of any of the property
covered by this item, shall the purchaser be required to look to the
application of the purchase money.
Item Thirteen: I nominated and appoint my wife Mary A Ryerson as executrix
and my son Martin A Ryerson as executor of this my will and direct that no
bond be required of them for the performance of their duties. My said
executors shall have full power to do any and all acts necessary for the
interest of my estate and for carrying into effect the objects of this
instrument, including the power of sale and transfer of leasing making
contracts investments, reinvestments, or exchanges and generally to do all
acts which I might do.
In witness where of, I the said Martin Ryerson have hereunto set my
hand and seal this first (1st) day of December in the year eighteen hundred
and eighty six. Martin Ryerson (SEAL)

Signed and declared by the said Martin Ryerson as and for his last will
and testament in the presence of us (both being present at the same time) who
at his request and in his presence and in the presence of each other have
hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses.
John J Herrick Residing in Chicago Illinois
Charles L Allen Residing in Chicago Illinois
Proved and admitted to record in open Court September 29th 1887.
J C Knickerbocker
Probate Judge.

Endorsed on Will
Will of Martin Ryerson Dec'd
Filed September 15th 1887.
Thos W Sennott, Clerk.

State of Illinois ) ss
County of Cook ) In the Probate Court of Cook County
Proved and admitted to record in open Court this 29th day
of September AD 1887.

Thos W Sennott, Clerk.
Recorded in Prob. Doc. Rec'd of Wills
Vol. 7 page 616.
Thos W Sennott, Clerk.
United States of America
State of Illinois ) ss
County of Cook ) Probate Court of Cook County
September term AD 1887. The 29th day of September AD 1887. Court being in
session.
Present, Hon. Joshua C Knickerbocker.
Judge of Probate Court Cook, County,
Canute R. Matson Sheriff of Cook County,
Attest Thomas W. Sennott, Clerk of the Probate Court of Cook County.
In the matter of the last Will and Testament of Martin Ryerson Deceased
[Page 492] proof of will and issue of Letters Testamentary. This day came Martin A Ryerson and Mary A Ryerson of the County of Cook in the State of Illinois and
produced in Court an instrument in writing purporting to be the last Will and
Testament of Martin Ryerson and presented and filed therewith their petition
duly verified praying that said will might be admitted to Probate and that
Letters Testamentary there on might be issued to them the executors named
therein.
And it appearing to the Court from said petition that Martin Ryerson of
Chicago in said County departed this life on the sixth day of September 1887
leaving said writing as and for his last will and testament and thereupon
John J Herrick and Charles L Allen the subscribing witnesses to said will
appeared and in open court on oath testified that they were present at the
execution of said will and saw the said Martin Ryerson sign said will in
their presence and heard him declare the same to be his last will and
testament That they subscribed their names thereto as witnesses in the
presence of and at the request of said testator and in the presence of each
other and that they believed the said testator was of sound mind and memory
and of lawful age at the time of signing said will: Which testimony was
reduced to writing by a short hand reporter and a transcript thereof filed
with said instrument the signatures of the said wiseness thereto being waived
by the Court, And it appearing to the Court from said testimony that said
will was duly executed and attested according to law, and that the said
testator was of sound disposing mind and memory and otherwise competent to
make his will at the time of signing the same: It is ordered that said will
be received and recorded as the last will and testament of the said Martin
Ryerson Deceased. And it is further ordered that Letters of Testamentary on
said will be issued to the said Martin A Ryerson and Mary A Ryerson Executors
named in said Will upon their filing their bond as such Executors in the
penal sum of Six million and four hundred thousand dollars conditioned as the
law directs.
Whereupon said Martin A Ryerson and Mary A Ryerson presented their said
bound dully executed without surety, surety being expressly waived by said
will and take and subscribe the oath of office as such executors, and the
Court having examined and approved said bond.
It is ordered that Letters Testamentary be issued accordingly and it is
further ordered that H B Galpin, F B Lane and E T Goold be appointed to
appraise the personal estate of said decedent subject to appraisement and
that a warrant be issued to them therefor.
J C Knickerbocker, Judge.
State of Illinois )ss
County of Cook ) I Thomas W Sennott, Clerk of the Probate Court of
Cook County in the state aforesaid do herby certify that the within and
foregoing is a true transcript of the proceedings had before said court in
the matter of the proof of will and grant of Letters Testamentary in the
estate of Martin Ryerson deceased.
In witness where of I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal
of the Probate Court of Cook County at Chicago in said County this 8th day of
September AD 1887.
State of Illinois Clerk.
County of Cook

[Page 493]
The People of the State of Illinois
To all to whom these presents shall come, Greeting.
Know Ye, that wearies Martin Ryerson late of County of Cook and state
of Illinois died on or about the 6th day of September AD 1887 as it is said
after having duly made and published his last will and testament a copy where
of is hereunto annexed leaving at the time of his death property in this
State which may be lost destroyed or diminished in value if speedy care be
not taken of the same and inas much as it appears that Martin A Ryerson and
Mary A Ryerson have been appointed Executors in and by the said last Will and
Testament to execute the same and to the end that the said property may be
preserved for those who shall appear to have a legal right or interest
therein and that said will may be executed according to the request of the
said testator wedo hereby authorize them the said Martin A Ryerson and Mary
A Ryerson as such executors to collect and secure all and singular the goods
and chattel rights and credits which were of the said Martin Ryerson at the
time of his deceased in whosesoever hands or possession the same may be found
in this state and well and truly to perform and fulfill all such duties as
may be enjoyed upon them by the said will so far as there shall be property
and the law charge them and in general to do and perform all other acts which
now are, or hereafter may be required of them by law.
Witness. Thomas W. Sennott, Clerk of the Probate Court of
said County of Cook and the seal of said Court this 29th day of Sept. AD 1887. (SEAL) Thos W Sennott Clerk

State of Illinois )ss
County of Cook ) I Thomas W Sennott Clerk of the Probate Court of
Cook County in the State aforesaid do herby certify that the within is a
true and correct copy of the last will and testament of Martin Ryerson
Deceased and of Letters Testamentary issued thereon on the 29th of Sept AD
1887 to Martin A Ryerson and Mary A Ryerson now in force as it appears from
the originals on file and from the records of the Probate Court in my office.
In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal of
the said probate Court at Chicago in said County this 8th day of October AD
1887. (SEAL) Thos W Sennott, Clerk United States of America
State of Illinois )ss
County of Cook ) I Thomas W Sennott Clerk of the Probate Court of
Cook County in the Sate of Illinois (said Court being a Court of record) do
hereby certify that the Hon, Joshua C Knickerbocker whose name is subscribed
to the annexed and foregoing certificate of attestation was at the time of
the signing thereof and now is the Probate Judge of said Cook County and sole
presiding Judge of said Probate Court, duly elected, commissioned and
qualified and that his said signature is genuine.
In witness whereof, I have signed my name and affixed the seal of said
Probate Court at my office in the City of Chicago in said Cook County this
eighth day of September 1887. (SEAL) Thomas W Sennott
Clerk [Page 494]
United States of America
State of Illinois )ss
County of Cook ) I Thomas W Sennott, Clerk of the Probate Court of
Cook County and the keeper of the records and files thereof in the State
aforesaid do hereby certify the annexed and foregoing to be a true and
correct copy of the last will and testament of Martin Ryerson deceased proved
and admitted to record in open court on the 29th day of September AD 1887.
Together with an order of Court probating said will also Letters
Testamentary, as they appear from the originals now on file and the records
of said Court now in my office. And I further certify that I have compared
the same with the originals now on file in my office and have caused the to
be exemplified under the act of congress in such case made and provided.
In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal of
said Probate Court at my office in the City of Chicago in said County this
8th day of September AD 1887.
Thomas W Sennoth
(SEAL) Clerk of the Probate Court

State of Illinois )ss
County of Cook ) I Joshua C Knickerbocker Probate Judge of Cook
County and sole presiding Judge of the Probate Court of Cook County in the
State of Illinois do herby certify that Thomas W Sennott Esq. whose name is
subscribed to the foregoing certificate of attestation now is and was at the
time of signing and sealing the same the Clerk of the probate Court of Cook
County aforesaid and keeper of the records files and seal thereof duly
elected and qualified to office and that full faith and credit are and of
right ought to be given to all his official acts as such in all courts of
record and elsewhere and that his said attestation is in due form of law and
by the proper office.
Given under my hand and seal at Chicago in said Cook County this eighth
day of September AD 1887.
Joshua C Knickerbocker (seal),
Probate Judge of Cook County Illinois
State of Michigan )ss
County of Muskegon ) At a session of the Probate Court for the County
of Muskegon holden at the Probate Office in the City of Muskegon on Monday
the twenty first day of November in the year on thousand eight hundred and
eighty seven.
Present Orrin Whitney Judge of Probate.
In the matter of the estate of Martin Ryerson deceased,
This day having been appointed by the Court for hearing the petition of
Martin A Ryerson praying amongst other things for reasons therein set forth
that a certain instrument purporting to be a copy of the last Will and
testament of said deceased and the Probate thereof duly authenticated and
heretofore presented to this Court with said petition be allowed filed and
recorded. Now comes into Court the said petitioner and presents proofs. And
it satisfactorily appearing by due proof on file that a copy of the order of
this Court touching the hearing of said petition and made on the twenty
eighth day of October last past has bee duly published as there in directed
whereby all parties interested in the premises were duly notified of
[Page 495]
said hearing. An it further satisfactorily to the Court after a full hearing
upon said petition and on examination of the proofs and allegations of the
petitioner that said deceased was at the time of his death a resident of the
County of Cook in the Sate of Illinois and died leaving his last will and
testament which was duly proved and allowed in the City of Chicago County of
Cook in the State of Illinois according to the laws thereof and that he was
possessed of estate situate in said County of Muskegon on which said Will
operates and the evidence touching the premises being maturely considered it
satisfactorily appears that said copy of said Will ought to be allowed in
this State as the last Will and Testament of said deceased
I N is therefore ordered, adjudged and decreed by this Court that said
copy of said last Will and Testament of said deceased be allowed, filed and
recorded in this Court and that the same shall have full force and effect in
this State as such Will, agreeably to the Statue in such case made and
provided. And it is further ordered that the execution of said last Will and
Testament be committed and the administration of the estate of said deceased
by granted to said Martin A Ryerson one of the executors in said Will named
who is ordered to give bond in the penal sum of three hundred thousand
dollars with sufficient sureties as required by the statue in such case made
and provided: and upon the same being duly approved and filed, the Letters
Testamentary do issue in the premises.
Orrin Whitney Judge of
Probate.
State of Michigan )ss Probate Court for said County
County of Muskegon ) Be it remembered that the annexed and foregoing
instrument being a duly authenticated copy of the last will and testament of
Martin Ryerson late of the County of Cook in the State of Illinois deceased
which was duly allowed, filed and recorded in said Court in pursuance of the
decree thereof, of which the foregoing is a true, full and correct copy.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal
of said Court at the City of Muskegon in said County this 21st day of
November in the year one thousand eight hundred and eight seven.
(SEAL) Orrin Whitney
Judge of Probate
State of Michigan )ss Probate Court for said County
County of Muskegon ) I Nellie Conklin do hereby certify that I am
Register of the Probate Court of said County, that I have compared the
forgoing copy of a complete transcript, duly authenticated of the last will
and testament of Martin Ryerson deceased with certificates showing said will
was duly allowed & admitted to Probate in Cook County Illinois. Also a
certificate issued out of the Probate Court for Muskegon County, allowing and
admitting said copy of said will to probate in said County with the original
and record thereof, now remaining in this office, and have found and hereby
certify the same to be a correct transcript therefrom and of the whole of
such original and record.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal
of the Probate Court at Muskegon, the 30th day of November in the year of our
Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty seven.
(SEAL) Nellie Conklin Probate Register
State of Michigan )ss Probate Court for said County.
County of Muskegon ) I Orrin Whitney, do hereby certify that I am

[Page 496]
Presiding Judge of the Probate Court aforesaid which is a Court of Record and
that the foregoing exemplification of record is authenticated in due form.
In testimony where of I have hereunto set my hand and affixed to seal
oof the Probate Court at Muskegon the 30" day of November in the year oour
Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty seven. (SEAL) Orrin Whitney Judge of Probate


Submitted by Patricia Kay Montney- Thanks Pat!

Another "Thank You" to the Greater Muskegon Historic Association for sharing their information! You can find information on the Association and their efforts to preserve the history of Muskegon on the Library/Resources page. Also see the other contributions to the Muskegon MIGenWeb by the Association below-
The Last Livery- Information on the last livery stable in Michigan.
Old Indian Cemetery- Deeded to the City of Muskegon by Martin Ryerson


Chicago, Evanston & Southern Railroad Company

The Chicago, Evanston & Southern Railroad Company was a phantom railroad. It never existed--except on paper.

The Evanston Index, Volume XX, Number 14, Saturday, August 22, 1891, page 3:

The Chicago, Evanston & Southern Railroad Company filed articles of incorporation at Springfield, Thursday, August 20, 1891. They propose to run a street railway from a point in Evanston, south between the west shore of Lake Michigan and the east line of the Chicago & North Western Railway to Edgewood Avenue in Chicago, thence east on or near Edgewood Avenue to Franklin Street, south on or near Franklin Street to Kinzie Street, west across the North Branch of the Chicago River to Clinton Street, south on or near Clinton Street to 64th Street to Jackson Park, then southeast to Blue Island. The principal office is located at Chicago and the capital stock is estimated at $22 million. The elevated road is designed to pick up through travel across the city from Evanston to Jackson Park. There will be but one fare and that a low one between these places. The locomotive power will be probably electricity. The railroad will be well under way in two or three weeks. The incorporators and first board of directors are all Chicagoans Messrs. George W. Cole, Canute R. Matson, J. Warren Pease, John M. Getman, and Pleasant Amick.

Then, a week later, a retraction?

The Evanston Index, Volume XX, Number 15, Saturday, August 29, 1891, page 1:

It is not under the management of George W. Cole, Canute R. Matson, John M. Getman, J. Warren Pease, and Pleasant Amick. Those gentlemen organized the phantom line several years ago which was to have run alongside the present "alley" elevated line on the South Side of Chicago. The following year, these same capitalists incorporated a company whose intention it was to construct an underground railway from the foot of Cass Street to 90th Street on the South Side, at an expense variously estimated at $10 million and $12 million, which road is not yet completed. THE INDEX has not yet been informed whether it was ever begun. Last week it was announced that these gentlemen had another scheme, and that they were incorporated with a capital stock of $20 million and that they propose to build a line constructed on the Davy patent, the cars to be run suspended from above in the flanges of T-shaped girders, supported by arms from a single pillar 30 feet in height, which stands on a solid concrete foundation in the center of the Street. This is not the company which THE INDEX wishes to introduce to the attention of the people of Evanston.

In a couple of days Mr. Alexander Clark, of South Evanston, John Lewis Cochran of Edgewater, and DeLancey Horton Louderbach of Chicago, the incorporators of the Chicago & Evanston Electric Street Railway will make application for the incorporation of a new company, with a capital stock of $1 million, which will build an elevated road three miles in length through the North Side River District, and connecting with the Chicago & Evanston Electric Street Railway line. It will land the Evanston passengers within one block of Marshall Field’s store and without the necessity of a transfer, for the same cars will run the entire length of both lines. Three-quarters of an hour will be the time in which passengers from Evanston can be transferred to the business center of the city by the new line.

The engineers of the plan are going to push their surface road to the North Branch of the Chicago River, and from this point propose to elevate along the river on some one of the diagonal streets running parallel with Clybourn Avenue as far as Michigan Avenue or Kinzie Street. From these streets it will cross the river by the top story of one of the bridges, in the same manner as the Lake Street Elevated Railroad, and will have its terminus in the business center.

The absurdity of the Chicago, Evanston & Southern Railroad scheme is shown by the fact that instead of putting its passengers down conveniently in that part of the city to which they wish to go it steers directly past this portion and proposes to cross the river to the west side, from Kinzie to Canal Streets. It would offer no better facilities, as far as the terminus is concerned for Evanston people, than are now given by the Chicago & North Western Railway Company or Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Company. Further, it is doubtful whether dividends could be earned by such a railroad. The Lake Street Elevated Railroad line with franchises already granted on an 80 foot street, five miles in length, and running through a densely populated district, cannot sell a dollar of its bonds. The new line, besides carrying the traffic of the Chicago & Evanston Street Railway Company to the center of the city, will perform the same service for the Elston Avenue electric line. The entire wikipedia:Jefferson Park, Chicago:township of Jefferson will be laid tribute to this elevated line.

The origin of the plan for an elevated terminus to the Chicago & Evanston Electric Railroad Company is given by Mr. Alexander Clark as follows: “Meetings have been held for the last three weeks each Saturday night in Junges Hall, Gross Park. Speeches were made by Cook County Commissioner George W. Brandt, Chicago Alderman P.F. Haynes ( Democrat, 26th Ward), Ex-Mayor of Lake View, William Boldenweck, and himself. The people there are suffering from the poor facilities for transportation offered by horsecar lines. Chicago Alderman P.F. Haynes expressed the situation exactly in his emphatic way when he said, ‘We are dumped in the mud at the end of the Lincoln Avenue cable, coming out from the city we are carried one and one-half miles further and dumped in the mud again one mile further upon horsecar transfers, are the present facilities for reaching Graceland Avenue. The people will welcome any company who will penetrate this territory and give them a through ride to the center of the city. Those present at the meetings pledged themselves to assist such a company in securing franchises. The Chicago & Evanston Electric Railroad Company were strongly urged to make the attempt.

Encouraged by the strong interest at the meetings and opinions which came from other quality of the promoters of the enterprise have decided to make the attempt. Pushing down as far as possible on the surface, we will elevate the rest of the way through the river district. A route has been outlined and preparations are being made to secure the consent of the owners of abutting property. The ownership of property along the route proposed has been looked up and it is found that to secure the necessary frontage down to Kinzie Street it will not be necessary to deal with more than a dozen persons, the property all being held in strong hands. An elevated company will be organized at once and efforts for a franchise vigorously pushed. The plan will be to build down to the cable first, so as to give some speedy relief, and then push on with the rest of the railroad as rapidly as possible. A separate incorporation for the elevated portion is necessary because an elevated line cannot be built under a surface charter. Separate articles of incorporation will be held, although both railroads are to be under one management.

“Securing a franchise from the Chicago City Council is not so hopeless a task as one might at first suppose. Within the next six months a strong pressure will be brought to bear by the outlying districts to secure better transit facilities than horsecars. Besides, the South and West Side railroads which have been spoken of before, the Calumet company is now before the Chicago City Council, asking for an ordinance covering the township of Calumet and Hyde Park. It is to connect South Chicago, Pullman, Harvey, and other South Side suburbs with the electric road at 67th Street and the cable line at Grand Crossing. One company is pushing in from Riverside Avenue and Lawndale Avenue, another from Cragin on Grand Avenue and Fulton Street, and a third from Montrose Avenue on Elston Avenue. These companies are all backed by the sentiment of the people residing in those districts they propose to serve, and when this sentiment is aroused such feeling on the part of their constituency will compel the Aldermen to help secure the ordinances in order to avoid political suicide. These Aldermen represent a majority of the Chicago City Council, and all that is necessary to do is to form a combination between these outlying districts and the ordinances will be forthcoming.

“Persons who travel to other cities come back with the positive belief that outside the 4-mile limit Chicago is more poorly served with transportation facilities than any large city in the United States. Even St. Louis, at which we are so prone to jibe, has better facilities than Chicago and its suburbs. One may start in the center of St. Louis and run out eight or nine miles on electric roads. Minneapolis and St. Paul are connected by a railroad ten miles in length, and I am told that three-quarters of an hour is the time necessary to go that distance. The steam cars in these two carry but one-fourth the number of passengers which was the average for this traffic before the electric lines were introduced. One reason why Chicago is so poorly served is because of the opposition of the Chicago City Council to overhead wires. One of two things will happen very soon, for the Chicago City Council will have to demonstrate to its satisfaction that some other system is feasible, or else allow overhead wires to be used within two miles, at least, of the center of the city. When wires are run from the centers of Boston, Cincinnati, and St. Louis the proposition appears reasonable, and it looks a trifle absurd for the Chicago City Council to refuse to permit wires when they are tolerated on Euclid Avenue, Cleveland.”

Lawyer Frank Crosby, of Chicago, has written to Mr. J.B. Lane, a prominent merchant of Elgin, to ascertain the popular feeling in regard to introducing the electric Street railway on the finest resident Streets of that city. The reply may be of interest to the Evanston public at a time when they are considering whether the electric railway shall be permitted to pass their residences. It is as follows:

Elgin, Ill., Aug. 22, 1891—On my return from New York I found your inquiry and in reply will say that at the start, as you are aware, we had some opposition but at present I do not know of any one but that is more than pleased. The only difficulty is that they want that we should put one on their Street if one is not run there at present. I would suggest the names of the following representative gentlemen to whom any one can refer to substantiate what I have said: On Highland Avenue, B.M. Chapman, George M. Peck, and F.L. McClare on State Street, D.E. Wood, J. McNeil, and M.C. Tovic. on Chicago Avenue, P.S. Bartlett, M.R. Thompson and W.F. Hester on Douglas Avenue, Captala Wilson, D.J. Chamberliza and Leek Joslyn.


This was the last mention of this railroad in the Evanston Index.


On October 7, 1861, he enlisted as a soldier in the 13th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Company K, at Janesville, Wisconsin. During the Civil War, he was promoted to sergeant and at the close of the war he was honorably discharged as a first lieutenant at San Antonio, Texas. [4] [5]

Starting during 1869, Matson took a leading part in the councils of the Illinois Republican Party. As a member of the state governor&aposs staff and the Grand Army of the Republic, he was promoted first to major and later to colonel. He served as clerk of the Harrison Street Police Department and subsequently as a Justice of the Peace. He was elected Cook County Coroner in 1880. [6] [7]

During May 1886, while Matson was Deputy Sheriff of Cook County, the Haymarket Riot resulted in the death of several policemen. A number of arrests were made and charges were brought against eight men who were incarcerated in the Cook County Jail supervised by Matson. [8] Later in 1886, he succeeded Seth Hanchett as Sheriff of Cook County.

He was a delegate from Illinois to 1888 Republican National Convention. In 1899, Matson was appointed superintendent of the Lincoln Park postal station, succeeding Hermann Lieb. At the time of his death, Matson was the senior member of the law firm of Matson & Edwards in Chicago. [9]


Q329 Summary

To read the Tape Transcript, click here. Listen to MP3 (Pt. 1, Pt. 2).
To return to the Tape Index, click here.

FBI Catalogue Jones Speaking

FBI preliminary tape identification note: Labeled in part “7/4/78 News”

Date cues on tape: Contents of tape consistent with label

People named:

Charles Garry, lawyer for Peoples Temple
Pat Richartz, paralegal for Charles Garry
Huey Newton, leader of Black Panther Party
Angela Davis, member of Communist Party, black activist

David Wallechinsky, author of The Haymarket Affair
Cyrus McCormick, industrialist, target of strike during Haymarket
Martin Ambrose Foran, U.S. Rep. from Ohio, supporter of labor unions
John Bonfield, police captain in Haymarket affair
William Ward, police captain in Haymarket affair
Michael J. Schaack, police captain in Haymarket affair
Frederick Ebersold, Chief of Police in Haymarket affair
Mathias J. Degan, policeman killed in Haymarket affair
Joseph Eaton Gary, judge in Haymarket trial
Henry L. Ryce, bailiff in Haymarket trial
Julius Grinnell, prosecutor in Haymarket trial
Richard James Oglesby, governor of Illinois who oversaw executions
Canute R. Matson, sheriff of Cook County
John A. Roche, mayor of Chicago
John Peter Altgeld, governor of Illinois who pardoned several Haymarket convicts

August Spies, labor organizer arrested in Haymarket incident
Albert Parsons, labor organizer arrested in Haymarket incident
Samuel Fielden, labor organizer arrested in Haymarket incident
Michael Schwab, labor organizer arrested in Haymarket incident
Adolph Fischer, labor organizer arrested in Haymarket incident
George Engel, labor organizer arrested in Haymarket incident
Oscar Neebe, labor organizer arrested in Haymarket incident
Louis Lingg, labor organizer arrested in Haymarket incident
Rudolf Schnaubelt, labor organizer arrested in Haymarket incident
Lucy Gonzalez, wife of Albert Parsons
William Holmes, friend of Albert Parsons

William Morris, socialist who supported Haymarket organizers
Peter Kropotkin, anarchist philosopher who supported Haymarket organizers
George Bernard Shaw, playwright who supported Haymarket organizers
Annie Besant, theosophist who supported Haymarket organizers
Samuel Gompers, president, American Federation of Labor

Socrates, Greek philosopher
Giordano Bruno, executed for heresy in 1600
John Huss, Christian martyr, executed for heresy in 1451
Galileo, Italian physicist, mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher

Bible verses cited: None

(Note: This tape was transcribed by Nicole Bissett. The editors gratefully acknowledge her invaluable assistance.)

While this tape begins as a news tape, with several items of national and international news – most of which put US foreign policy and economics in a negative light – the bulk of the reading is of an account of the Haymarket Affair, a notorious incident in the history of the U.S. labor struggle for an eight-hour workday and other benefits of unionization.

Jim Jones reads from the work The Haymarket Affair by David Wallechinsky, continuing through several segments. As he does in most similar readings, Jones adds periodic editorial commentary, ranging from single words or phrases like “monopoly capitalist,” to lengthier asides. After noting that the number of union leaders, socialists and anarchists who went on trial for the incident was lower than the number originally arrested because of plea-bargaining and deals for immunity, for example, Jones adds that most of the ones who escaped punishment were dead or arrested on other charges within a few years. “That is the history of finks, always,” he concludes. “You may get your immunity for the moment, for lying, then to have to live with a guilty conscience all of your life.” After reading the description of the jury which tried the remaining men – and which was stacked against the defendants – Jones says, “The US’s farce that you have a right to a jury trial by your peers was, as always, denied, and still is today.”

As he does with other readings, whether they be of individual news items or longer analytical pieces such as this one, Jones points out the object lessons for the people of Jonestown or otherwise tries to make it relevant to them. After being sentenced to death by hanging, the defendants in the Haymarket affair were given the opportunity to speak, and several spoke of the nobility of being martyrs for the cause. “’I say, if death is the penalty for proclaiming the truth, then I will proudly and defiantly pay the costly price,’” he quotes one as saying. “’Call your hangmen. … [O]thers whose numbers are legion have preceded us on this path. We are ready to follow, we are ready to die.’” Jones cries out the defiance of others sentenced that day – “’Hang me, too! For I think it is more honorable to die suddenly than to be killed by inches.’” – and includes his own judgment that, “He’ll be glad to die as a socialist.”

There are more specific references to the Temple’s own past. After reading about the path to socialism of the some of the Haymarket defendants as an act of defiance, Jones recalls, “that’s how some came to our movement when [Temple antagonist Lester] Kinsolving was attacking us on the flimsiest reasons, not naming that it was really for the fact that we were socialist and had given several thousands of dollars to free Angela Davis.”

The news items from the opening minutes of the tape include:

As with the featured reading, Jones adds periodic commentary to individual news stories. Following the item about the Memphis firefighters, for example, Jones says, “It’s interesting to see that these, who maintain law and order … [are] so quick to condemn blacks who seek bread when they’re hungry. But here they’ve set 300 fires in the city of Memphis, Tennessee to protest their unjust working conditions.”

FBI Summary:

Date of transcription: 6/20/79

In connection with the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s investigation into the assassination of U.S. Congressman LEO J. RYAN at Port Kaituma, Guyana, South America, on November 18, 1978, a tape recording was obtained. This tape recording was located in Jonestown, Guyana, South America, and was turned over to U.S. Officials in Guyana and subsequently transported to the United States.

On June 2, 1979, Special Agent (name deleted) reviewed the tape numbered 1B93-69. This tape was found to contain the following:


Canute Matson - History

Substance News - May 04, 2021

"Prepare for the Stormy Times Before Us"

Chicago's Haymarket affair

May 4, 1886 https://publish.illinois.edu

On Tuesday, May 4, 1886, at 7:30 PM, around 1,500 workers gathered on Desplaines Street in Chicago between Lake and Randolph in an area known as Haymarket Square. They gathered together to protest actions the police had taken the previous day against a strike at the McCormick Harvesting Machine Company that left one man dead and many others injured. Strikes were becoming more common throughout the U.S. during the 1880s as workers began protesting long hours and low wages. Born out of conflict between labor and management, strikes often resulted in hostility as well, since police and activists typically clashed at these events.

The May 4 rally began as a peaceful event, which was confirmed by Chicago Mayor Carter Harrison, who attended the rally as an observer. As the rally began to wind down, the mayor left and the majority of the crowd began to dissipate. At that moment, the police arrived to disperse the remaining attendees. It was then that someone threw a bomb. Chaos ensued, and police and possibly some attendees opened fire. Seven police officers and at least one civilian died as a result of the violence at the rally, and at least sixty others were wounded.

Street diagram of Haymarket Square indicating where the bomb was thrown and where it exploded.

Interested in learning more? Peruse a full electronic copy of A concise history of the great trial of the Chicago anarchists in 1886 by Dyer D. Lum. Due to the chaos that ensued after the bomb exploded, it was difficult to determine where the bomb was thrown from. Maps depicting the event illustrate inconsistent details and the differences in opinion about where the location of the unknown assailant and the explosion were in relation to the wagon holding the speakers. Some maps place them north of the wagon, others depict them to the south. One fact seems to remain consistent throughout many of the sketches: the bomb exploded close to the wagon and the speakers.

Zepf’s Hall, highlighted in item 2, was a tavern that had become a frequent spot for Chicago’s socialists to gather together. Some sources suggest that this was the agreed upon meeting place for attendees after the rally.

Illustrations of the Haymarket Rally

Illustration of the scene in Haymarket Square as the bomb exploded.

Illustration of the rally, and approaching police, in Haymarket Square the evening of May 4, 1886.

Explore this electronic copy of Schaack’s book the discover more images and information about Anarchy and Anarchists.

The details of what happened on the night of May 4 vary depending on which source you consult. Sketches, much like maps of the rally, often contain conflicting renderings of what happened that night, usually influenced by opinions of the police force or the laborers. As an example, the sketches listed above appear in a work written by Michael J. Schaack, who was captain of a Chicago police force division at the time of the Haymarket Affair.

As item 3 depicts, officers arrived at the rally as the last of the speakers were delivering their messages from the bed of the wagon. They marched from the police station down the street to the rally in rows. They ordered the crowd to disperse, even though most of the 1,500 attendees had already left, partially due to the rain that was beginning to fall down on the gathering. In the sketch, it appears that there are still a large number of laborers at the rally, and many in the crowd seem to be hostile towards the officers before them.

Item 4 is a sketch of the moment when the bomb exploded. It depicts both sides opening fire on one another, contradicting other sources that report police officers opening fire only after the bomb had exploded. While multiple sources report police shooting in response to the bomb, it is unclear whether the attendees began shooting at police. This sketch, however, shows the laborers firing upon police as the bomb is exploding, suggesting that this was a premeditated attack on police.

Sketch of seven of the eight men arrested in response to the bombing. Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper. V. 65-66. November 12, 1887.

Item 5: Sketch of seven of the eight men arrested in response to the bombing. Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper. V. 65-66. November 12, 1887. Rare Book and Manuscript Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library.

Eight men were arrested in the days following the rally on charges of murder in connection with the unknown bomber. Several of the men were not even at the rally that evening and had witnesses to prove they were nowhere near Haymarket Square when the bomb was thrown. The arrests sent shockwaves throughout the country and led to a controversial trial.

What became known as the Haymarket Affair set off a wave of xenophobia and anti-labor sentiments not only in Chicago, but also throughout the rest of the country. Labor organizers, immigrants, and radicals were arrested by police around the U.S. In August of 1886, eight men, known as the “Chicago Eight,” were charged with murder in connection with the bombing. They had become primary suspects due to their political beliefs and pro-labor activities, even though some of those charged had not attended the rally that evening.

The ensuing indictments and trial were controversial. Many believed both the jury and judge were biased, and there was little evidence presented in court that linked the eight men to the bombing. Regardless, on August 20, 1886, the jury found the defendants guilty and Judge Joseph E. Gary sentenced seven of the eight to death. News of the Haymarket Affair and the subsequent court case extended far beyond the city of Chicago. Its impact was felt throughout the world, sparking both positive and negative changes for working classes everywhere.

The “Chicago Eight,” the trial, and its aftermath became international news. August Spies, a German immigrant and one of the organizers of the rally, became well-known as he was subsequently indicted, charged, and sentenced to death. This copy of his autobiography, printed in Dutch and published in Rotterdam, is one example of the reach and the impact the Haymarket Affair had not only in the United States, but around the world as well.

The Haymarket Affair and the ensuing two-month-long trial was followed by newspapers both in Chicago and across the country. Portrayal of both the police and the eight men who were charged varied greatly. The men on trial were held up as martyrs by laborers and activists, while at the same time many in the press painted them as blood-thirsty murderers. Newspaper articles covering the trial, such as the ones in this collage, document not only the details of the case, but also the different opinions and reactions to the Affair and its aftermath.

On November 10, 1887, the day before the execution of seven of the “Chicago Eight,” Governor Oglesby sent a telegraph to Cook County Sheriff Canute R. Matson informing him of his decision to commute the sentences of Samuel Fielden and Michael Schwab. He changed their sentences from death by hanging to life imprisonment. In the telegraph, Oglesby also confirmed that the court’s sentences for the other convicted men would remain the same. That same day, Louis Lingg, who was one of the remaining five men to be executed, committed suicide in his prison cell.

The next day, on November 11, Adolph Fischer, George Engel, Albert Parsons, and August Spies were hanged. The remaining three men were later pardoned by Governor John P. Altgeld in 1893, a decision which received mixed feelings from the public.

Green, James. Death in the Haymarket: A story of Chicago, the first labor movement and the bombing that divided Gilded Age America. New York: Pantheon Books, 2006.

Roediger, Dave, and Franklin Rosement, eds. Haymarket Scrapbook, Anniversary Edition. Chicago: Charles H. Kerr Publishing Company, 2012.

You can find both primary and secondary sources related to the Haymarket Affair here at the Illinois History and Lincoln Collections. In resources like the two listed above, secondary sources can provide a better understanding of the political climate at the time of the rally, the details of what happened the night of May 4, the arrests and subsequent trial, and the impact the Haymarket Affair had on the world.


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On October 7, 1861, he enlisted as a soldier in the 13th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Company K, at Janesville, Wisconsin. During the Civil War, he was promoted to sergeant and at the close of the war he was honorably discharged as a first lieutenant at San Antonio, Texas. [ 2 ] [ 3 ]

Starting during 1869, Matson took a leading part in the councils of the Illinois Republican Party. As a member of the state governor's staff and the Grand Army of the Republic, he was promoted first to major and later to colonel. In 1886, he succeeded Seth Hanchett as Sheriff of Cook County. During May 1886, the Haymarket Riot resulted in the death of several policemen. A number of arrests were made and charges were brought against eight men who were incarcerated in the Cook County Jail supervised by Matson. [ 4 ]

In 1899 Matson was appointed superintendent of the Lincoln Park postal station, succeeding Hermann Lieb. At the time of his death, Matson was the senior member of the law firm of Matson & Edwards. [ 5 ]


Watch the video: Suspension Trauma