Juneau II CL-119 - History

Juneau II CL-119 - History


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Juneau II CL-119

Juneau II

( CL-119: dp. 6~000; 1. 541'6"; b. 63'2"; dr. 16'4", s. 32 k. cpl. 623; a. 12 5", 2 3-pdrs., 24 40mm., 4 20mm; cl. Juneau;

The second Juneau (CL-119) was laid down by Federal Shipbuilding Co., Kearny, N.J., 15 September 1944; launched 15 July 1945; sponsored by Mrs. E. L. Bartlett; and commissioned 15 February 1946, Captain Rufus E. Rose in command.

Juneau spent her flrst year of commissioned service in operations along the Atlantic seaboard and Caribbean. Prior to the Korean War, she deployed three times in the Mediterranean. The ship cleared New York 16 April 1947, and joined the 6th Fleet at Trieste 2 May where she aided in stabilizing the unresolved question of territorial ownership between Italy and Yugoslavia. During an extended tour of Greece, she provided ample warning to the communists that aggression would not go unchallenged. The ship returned to Norfolk 15 November for training, and was back on duty with the 6th Fleet from 14 June to 3 October 1948 and again from 3 May to 26 September 1949. As on her first cruise, she ranged the Mediterranean to assure Europeans and Africans of our intention to guard world peace and freedom.

Having been reclassifled CLS~119 on 18 March 1949, Juneau departed Norfolk 29 November for the Pacific. She arrived Bremerton, Wash., 15 January 1950 and took part in operations along the Pacific coast. On 22 April she became flagship for Rear Admiral J. M. Higgins, Commander CruDiv 5, and reported for duty in Yokosuka, Japan, 1 June where she began surveillance patrols in the Tsushima Straits. When the Korean War broke out on 25 June, Juneau was one of the few ships immediately available to Vice Admiral C. Turner Joy, Commander of Naval Forces, Far East. She patrolled south of the 38th parallel to prevent enemy landings, conducted the flrst shore bombardments 29 June at Bokoko Ko, destroyed enemy shore installations, engaged in the flrst naval action 2 July when she sank three enemy torpedo boats near Chumonehin Chan, and supported raiding parties along the coast. On 18 July Juneau'~ force, which included British units, laid down a deadly barrage on enemy troop concentrations near Yongdok which slowed down the North Korean advance southward.

The ship departed Sasebo Harbor 28 July and made a sweep through Formosa Straits before reporting for duty with the 7th Fleet at Buckner Bay, Okinawa, 2 August. She became flagship of the Formosa Patrol Force 4 August remaining until 29 October when she joined the Fast Carrier Task Force operating off the east coast of Korea. The ship conducted daily plane guard for the attack carriers, and returned to Long Beach, Calif., 1 May 1951 for overhaul and a period of operations off the Pacific coast and in Hawaii. She returned to Yokosuka 19 April 1952 and conducted strikes along the Korean coast in coordination with carrier planes until returning to Long Beach 5 November.


Mediterranean, 1946-1949 Edit

Juneau spent her first year of commissioned service in operations along the Atlantic seaboard and Caribbean. Prior to the Korean War, she deployed three times in the Mediterranean. The ship cleared New York on 16 April 1947, and joined the 6th Fleet at Trieste on 2 May where she aided in stabilizing the unresolved question of territorial ownership between Italy and Yugoslavia. During an extended tour of Greece, she provided ample warning to the communists that aggression would not go unchallenged. The ship returned to Norfolk on 15 November for training, and was back on duty with the 6th Fleet from 14 June-3 October 1948 and again from 3 May-26 September 1949. As on her first cruise, she ranged the Mediterranean to assure Europeans and Africans of our intention to guard world peace and freedom. [3]

Having been reclassified CLAA-119 on 18 March 1949, Juneau departed Norfolk on 29 November for the Pacific. [3]

Korean War, 1950-1952 Edit

She arrived at Bremerton, Washington, on 15 January 1950 and took part in operations along the Pacific coast. On 22 April, she became flagship for Rear Admiral J. M. Higgins, Commander Cruiser Division 5 (CruDiv 5), and reported for duty in Yokosuka, Japan on 1 June, where she began surveillance patrols in the Tsushima Straits. When the Korean War broke out on 25 June, Juneau was one of the few ships immediately available to Vice Admiral C. Turner Joy, Commander of Naval Forces, Far East. She patrolled south of the 38th parallel to prevent enemy landings, conducted the first shore bombardments on 29 June at Bokuko Ko, destroyed enemy shore installations, engaged in the first naval action on 2 July when she sank three enemy torpedo boats near Chumonchin Chan, and supported raiding parties along the coast. On 18 July, Juneau ' s force, which included British units such as the Royal Navy light cruiser HMS Belfast, laid down a deadly barrage on enemy troop concentrations near Yongdok which slowed down the North Korean advance southward. [3] [4]

The ship departed Sasebo Harbor on 28 July and made a sweep through the Formosa Straits before reporting for duty with the 7th Fleet at Buckner Bay, Okinawa, on 2 August. She became flagship of the Formosa Patrol Force on 4 August, remaining until 29 October when she joined the Fast Carrier Task Force operating off the east coast of Korea. The ship conducted daily plane guard for the attack carriers, and returned to Long Beach, California, on 1 May 1951 for overhaul. [3] In nine months she was updated with improved Mk 37, 56 and 63 fire control and an improved armament of 14 3-inch/50cal (6x2 & 2x1) and 12 5-inch (6x2). [5] Underway on Jan 26 1952 and a period of operations off the Pacific coast and in Hawaii. She returned to Yokosuka on 19 April 1952 and conducted strikes along the Korean coast in coordination with carrier planes until returning to Long Beach on 5 November. [3] [4]

Atlantic, 1953-1955 Edit

Juneau engaged in training maneuvers and operations until 7 April 1953 when she arrived Norfolk to rejoin the Atlantic Fleet. On 13 May the cruiser departed for duty with the 6th Fleet once again, and returned home on 23 October. She operated in the Atlantic and Caribbean until 18 November 1954, then returned to the Mediterranean for her last tour of duty. [3]

After her return to the East Coast on 23 February 1955, she was placed in reserve at Philadelphia on 23 March 1955, and remained inactive until decommissioned on 23 July 1955. The ship was then attached to the Philadelphia Group of the Atlantic Reserve Fleet until 1 November 1959, when she was struck from the Naval Vessel Register. Juneau was sold for scrapping to the Union Minerals and Alloys Corporation, New York in 1962. [3]


Juneau's History in a Nutshell

The members of the Auke tribe of Tlingit Indians were the first settlers to the area that became Juneau. The land and the sea provided such an abundance of food and natural resources that these original settlers enjoyed a productive and creative lifestyle. The cultural heritage of all the Indian tribes of the Northwest Coastal areas is readily evident in Juneau and the surrounding area.

It was gold that spurred the birth of the town that was originally named Harrisburg, later renamed Juneau. The town was founded in 1880 by gold seekers Joe Juneau and Richard Harris. However, it was the Tlingit Chief Kowee that first pointed Harris and Juneau in the direction of Gold!

During the prime 60 years of gold mining in the area Juneau was home to three of the world's largest gold mines: The Alaska Juneau, and the Alaska Gastineau mine, on the Juneau side of the Channel and the Treadwell mine on the Douglas island side. The three produced $158 million worth of gold at a time when gold was priced between $20.00 and $35.00 an ounce. The Alaska Juneau mine closed during WWII as the cost of production became prohibitive. The Treadwell mine was flooded in 1917 and finally closed in 1922.

Joe Juneau continued his hunt for gold, heading for the Klondike in 1897. He died in Dawson in 1903 and his body was returned to Juneau to rest in the Evergreen Cemetery.

Richard Harris lost most of his holdings and went to work for various Juneau mining companies. He died in a sanitarium in Oregon in 1907. His body was also returned to Juneau and rests nearby that of Joe Juneau.

Chief Kowee received little or no credit for his part in the Juneau gold rush. He died in his home in Juneau's Indian Village in 1892. He was cremated, according to his wishes, at the entrance to Evergreen Cemetery. A bronze plaque marks that spot.

Credit to Juneau Convention and Visitors Bureau and historical contributors.


Category:USS Juneau (CL-119) - Wikimedia Common

On 2 July 1950, the USS Juneau, HMS Black Swan, and HMS Jamaica were sailing along the coast of the Sea of Japan (East Sea) when they encountered four North Korean torpedo and gunboats that had just finished escorting a flotilla of ten ammunition ships up the coast. The North Korean torpedo boats began an attack on the allied ships USS Juneau (CL-119) là chiếc dẫn đầu của lớp tàu tuần dương hạng nhẹ mang tên nó của Hải quân Hoa Kỳ.Là chiếc tàu chiến thứ hai của Hải quân Mỹ được đặt cái tên này tiếp nối theo chiếc tuần dương hạng nhẹ Juneau bị mất vào đầu Chiến tranh Thế giới thứ hai, nó được đặt lườn bởi hãng Federal. The USS Juneau CL-119 class cruisers were the 3rd group of USS ATLANTA (CL-51) class light cruisers. Due to war experiences with the Atlanta and Oakland groups the bridge structure was redesigned to improve overhead visibility and firing arc's for the light AA. The super firing 5 twin mounts were all lowered to improve stability and reduce weight

Survivors of the sinking of the USS Juneau, in interviews with the Courier over the years, recalled the cataclysmic explosion from the Japanese torpedo that took the ship, as wel USS JUNEAU was one of the OAKLAND - class light cruisers and the second ship in the Navy named after the city in Alaska. Redesignated CLAA 119 in March 1949, USS JUNEAU was decommissioned in July 1956 at Philadelphia, Penn., and remained there until sold for scrapping in 1962 Light cruiser USS Juneau (CL-119) fires first naval shore bombardment of Korean Conflict. June 30 1815 Sloop-of-War USS Peacock (22 guns) takes the 16-gun brig HMS Nautilus, in last action of the War of 1812. 1943 Third Fleet Amphibious Force lands troops on Rendova Island while naval gunfire silences Japanese artil lery Comments: On 29,June 1950, the USS Juneau CLAA-119 delivered the (first) U.S. Naval Gunfire Support of the Korean War. Captain Jesse D.Sowell shelled an enemy troop concentration at Bokuko Ko, on the Korean east coast, and engaged in the (first) Korean War Naval Action on 2,July 1950, when the USS Juneau sank 3 enemy torped

Naval Battle of Guadalcanaledit

CRUISERS (CA, CL, CLAA, CG, CGN, CB, CC, CLC) CL - 1 USS Chester CL - 2 USS Birmingham CL - 3 USS Salem CL - 4 USS Omaha CL - 5 USS Milwaukee CL - 6 USS Cincinnati CL - 7 USS Raleigh CL - 8 USS Detroit CL - 9 USS Richmond CL - 10 USS Concord CL - 11 USS Trenton CL - 12 USS Marblehead CL - 13 USS Memphis CL - 16 USS Denver CL - 17 USS Des Moine Worcester and Roanoke seemed to offer little more than the post- war group three Juneau-class light cruisers on 40% of the displacement, the USS Juneau (CL-119) as refitted in in 1951 with 6 twin Mk 38 5-inch (127 mm) guns and twelve (12) 50 3-inch (76 mm) guns on 6,000 ton displacement seeming a better answer. Moreover, the ships, had a. Email to friends Share on Facebook - opens in a new window or tab Share on Twitter - opens in a new window or tab Share on Pinterest - opens in a new window or tab.


JUNEAU CL 52

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Atlanta Class Light Cruiser
    Keel Laid May 27 1940 - Launched October 25 1941

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


JUNEAU CLAA 119

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Juneau Class Light Cruiser
    Keel Laid September 15 1944 - Launched July 15 1945

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


Specifications

The main gun battery of the Juneau-class was composed of six dual 5 inch/38 caliber (127 mm) gun mounts (12 5-inch guns). [2] The class was designed with a secondary anti-aircraft armament of thirty-two Bofors 40 mm anti-aircraft guns, and sixteen 20 mm rapid-fire anti-aircraft cannons with high-explosive shells. [3] After the war, the ships were planned to convert to a 3 inch/50 caliber (76 mm) secondary armament to replace the 40mm guns, but only the Juneau was converted. [4]

The class was powered by the same equipment as the Atlanta-class: four 665 psi boilers, connected to 2 geared steam turbines producing 75,000 hp (56 MW), and the ships could maintain a top speed of 33.6 knots (62 km/h). On trial the Juneau made 32.48 knots (60 km/h) at 78,985 SHP. The ships of the Juneau-class had the same armor as the Atlanta-class: a maximum of 3.5 in (88.9 mm) on their sides, with the captain's bridge and the 5-inch gun mounts being protected by a mere 1.25 in (31.75 mm). [3] The ships were originally designed for 47 officers and 695 men. [5]


This is why DARPA wants to build reusable drone swarms

Posted On November 01, 2018 21:45:39

For decades, U.S. military air operations have relied on increasingly capable multi-function manned aircraft to execute critical combat and non-combat missions. Adversaries’ abilities to detect and engage those aircraft from longer ranges have improved over time as well, however, driving up the costs for vehicle design, operation and replacement. An ability to send large numbers of small unmanned air systems with coordinated, distributed capabilities could provide U.S. forces with improved operational flexibility at much lower cost than is possible with today’s expensive, all-in-one platforms—especially if those unmanned systems could be retrieved for reuse while airborne. So far, however, the technology to project volleys of low-cost, reusable systems over great distances and retrieve them in mid-air has remained out of reach.

To help make that technology a reality, DARPA has launched the Gremlins program. Named for the imaginary, mischievous imps that became the good luck charms of many British pilots during World War II, the program envisions launching groups of UASs from existing large aircraft such as bombers or transport aircraft—as well as from fighters and other small, fixed-wing platforms—while those planes are out of range of adversary defenses. When the gremlins complete their mission, a C-130 transport aircraft would retrieve them in the air and carry them home, where ground crews would prepare them for their next use within 24 hours.

A Navy artistic depiction of a drone swarm launched from a cargo aircraft. (U.S. Navy)

The gremlins’ expected lifetime of about 20 uses could provide significant cost advantages over expendable systems by reducing payload and airframe costs and by having lower mission and maintenance costs than conventional platforms, which are designed to operate for decades.

The Gremlins program plans to explore numerous technical areas, including:

  • Launch and recovery techniques, equipment and aircraft integration concepts
  • Low-cost, limited-life airframe designs
  • High-fidelity analysis, precision digital flight control, relative navigation and station keeping

The program aims to conduct a compelling proof-of-concept flight demonstration that could employ intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance and other modular, non-kinetic payloads in a robust, responsive, and affordable manner.

This article originally appeared on the United States Department of Defense. Follow @DeptofDefense on Twitter.

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MIGHTY TRENDING

Service history [ edit | edit source ]

Mediterranean, 1946-1949 [ edit | edit source ]

Juneau spent her first year of commissioned service in operations along the Atlantic seaboard and Caribbean. Prior to the Korean War, she deployed three times in the Mediterranean. The ship cleared New York on 16 April 1947, and joined the 6th Fleet at Trieste on 2 May where she aided in stabilizing the unresolved question of territorial ownership between Italy and Yugoslavia. During an extended tour of Greece, she provided ample warning to the communists that aggression would not go unchallenged. The ship returned to Norfolk on 15 November for training, and was back on duty with the 6th Fleet from 14 June-3 October 1948 and again from 3 May-26 September 1949. Having been reclassified CLAA-119 on 18 March 1949, Juneau departed Norfolk on 29 November for the Pacific.

Korean War, 1950-1952 [ edit | edit source ]

She arrived at Bremerton, Washington on 15 January 1950 and took part in operations along the Pacific coast. On 22 April, she became flagship for Rear Admiral J. M. Higgins, Commander Cruiser Division 5 (CruDiv 5), and reported for duty in Yokosuka, Japan on 1 June, where she began surveillance patrols in the Tsushima Straits. When the Korean War broke out on 25 June, Juneau was one of the few ships immediately available to Vice Admiral C. Turner Joy, Commander of Naval Forces, Far East. She patrolled south of the 38th parallel to prevent enemy landings, conducted the first shore bombardments on 29 June at Bokuko Ko, destroyed enemy shore installations, engaged in the first naval action on 2 July when she sank three enemy torpedo boats near Chumonchin Chan, and supported raiding parties along the coast. On 18 July, Juneau ' s force, which included British units such as the Royal Navy light cruiser HMS Belfast, Ώ] laid down a deadly barrage on enemy troop concentrations near Yongdok which slowed down the North Korean advance southward.

The ship departed Sasebo Harbor on 28 July and made a sweep through the Formosa Straits before reporting for duty with the 7th Fleet at Buckner Bay, Okinawa on 2 August. She became flagship of the Formosa Patrol Force on 4 August, remaining until 29 October when she joined the Fast Carrier Task Force operating off the east coast of Korea. The ship conducted daily plane guard for the attack carriers, and returned to Long Beach, California on 1 May 1951 for overhaul. In nine months she was updated with improved Mk 37, 56 and 63 fire control and an improved armament of 12 3inch/50cal and the 12 5 inch. Underway on Jan 26 1952 and a period of operations off the Pacific coast and in Hawaii. She returned to Yokosuka on 19 April 1952 and conducted strikes along the Korean coast in coordination with carrier planes until returning to Long Beach on 5 November.

Atlantic, 1953-1955 [ edit | edit source ]

Juneau engaged in training maneuvers and operations until 7 April 1953 when she arrived Norfolk to rejoin the Atlantic Fleet. On 13 May the cruiser departed for duty with the 6th Fleet once again, and returned home on 23 October. She operated in the Atlantic and Caribbean until 18 November 1954, then returned to the Mediterranean for her last tour of duty.


USS Juneau (CL-119)

USS Juneau (CL-119) was an Atlanta class light cruiser that entered service too late for the Second World War, but saw action during the Korean War. She received five battle stars for Korean War service.

The Juneau was launched on 15 July 1945 and commissioned on 15 February 1946. After spending a year operating off the Atlantic coast, she was posted to the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean. Her first tour lasted from 2 May-15 November 1947 and saw her take part in operations at Trieste, then disputed between Italy and Yugoslavia, and in Greece, where the Americans provided support against the Communist guerrillas. A second tour with the 6th Fleet lasted from 14 June-3 October 1948 and a third from 3 May to 26 September 1949.

On 18 March 1949 the Juneau was reclassified as CLAA-119. In November of the same year she was posted to the Pacific, although she was delayed on the US West Coast and didn't reach Japan until 1 June 1950. Her first task was to patrol the Tsushima Straits, and she was thus immediately available when the Korean War began on 25 June 1950.

Her immediate role was to patrol the coast south of the 38th parallel to guard against possible North Korean amphibious attacks. During this period she also conducted the first US Navy shore bombardment of the war, hitting targets at Bokuki Ko (29 June) and the first US naval engagement, when she sank three torpedo boats near Chumonchin Chan (2 July). On 18 July she was part of an Allied flotilla that bombarded North Korean troops near Yongdok.

Her first Korean tour ended soon after this, and on 2 August she joined the 7th Fleet at Okinawa. She was flagship of the Formosa Force from 4 August to 29 October.

This was followed by her second tour of duty off Korea, this time acting as part of the carrier screen for the Fast Carrier Task Force operating off the Korean east coast. This tour lasted well into 1951, before she was sent back to the US for a refit, arriving at Long Beach on 1 May 1951.

After a spell operating on the US West Coast the Juneau returned to the Far East for a third Korean tour. She reached Yokosuka on 19 April 1952, and supported the carriers off the Korean coast from then until October. She then returned to the US once again, reaching Long Beach on 5 November.

This ended her Korean War service. She was used for training and operations off the West Coast until April 1953. She then joined the Atlantic Fleet for a short spell, before on 13 May leaving to join the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean once again. This lasted until October 1953 and was followed by a short spell off the US East Coast. One final tour with the 6th Fleet followed, but on her return she was placed in reserve (23 March 1956), then decommissioned (23 July 1956). She didn't remain in the reserve for long, and was struck off in 1959. She was sold for scrap in 1962.


Watch the video: Frank Stefanelli 2017 on World War II


Comments:

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  5. Phuc

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  6. Etan

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