History of LST - 296 - 310 - History

History of LST - 296 - 310  - History


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LST - 296 - 310

LST-296 through LST - 300

LST - 296 through LST-300 contracts were cancelled on 16 September 1942.

LST - 301

LST - 301 was laid down on 26 June 1942 at the Boston Navy Yard; launched on 15 September 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Margaret A. Caruso; and commissioned on I November 1942. LST-301 performed no active service with the United States Navy. She was transferred to the United Kingdom on 6 November 1942 and returned to United States Navy custody on 20 March 1946. LST-301 was transferred to the War Shipping Administration for disposition and struck from the Navy list in December 1947.

LST - 302

LST - 302 was laid down on 27 June 1942 at the Boston Navy Yard; launched on 15 September 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Elizabeth D. Walsh; and commissioned on 10 November 1942. LST-302 was transferred to the United Kingdom on 14 November 1942 and returned to United States Navy custody on 5 January 1946. On 20 March 1946, she was struck from the Navy list and sold to Northern Metals Co., Philadelphia, Pa., on 11 December 1947 for scrapping.

LST - 303

LST - 303 was laid down on 3 July 1942 at the Boston Navy Yard; launched on 21 September 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Myrtle R. Doucette; and commissioned on 20 November 1942. LST-303 was transferred to the United Kingdom on 21 November 1942 and returned to United States Navy custody on 1 June 1946. On 3 July 1946, she was struck from the Navy list and sold to Bosey, Philippines, on 5 December 1947.

LST - 304

LST - 304 was laid down on 3 July 1942 at the Boston Navy Yard; launched on 21 September 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Justine F. Dinn; and commissioned on 29 November 1942. LST-304 was transferred to the United Kingdom on 30 November 1942 and returned to United States Navy custody on 29 November 1946. On 1 August 1947, she was struck from the Navy list and sold to Tung Hwa Trading Co., Singapore, on 7 October 1947 for conversion for merchant service.

LST - 305

LST - 305 was laid down on 24 July 1942 at the Boston Navy Yard; launched on 10 October 1942; sponsored by Miss Lillian R. Earley; and commissioned on 6 December 1942. LST-305 was transferred to the United Kingdom on 7 December 1942. She was sunk by an Axis submarine off Anzio, Italy, on 20 February 1944 and struck from the Navy list on 16 May 1944.

LST - 306

LST - 306 was laid down on 24 July 1942 at the Boston Navy Yard; launched on 10 October 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Caroline De Simone; and commissioned on 11 December 1942, Lt. B. J. Bartram, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-306 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 13 June 1946. She was redesignated Bernalillo County (LST-306) after a county in New Mexico on 1 July 1955 and struck from the Navy list on I February 1959. On 22 October 1959, she was sold to Ships, Inc., of Miami, Fla. LST-306 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 307

LST - 307 was laid down on 15 September 1942 at the Boston Navy Yard; launched on 9 November 1942; sponsored by Miss Lauretta Watts; and commissioned on 23 December 1942, Lt. James B. Markham in command. During World War II, LST-307 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 Following the war, LST-307 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early March 1946. Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 13 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 31 July 1946. On 30 March 1948, she was sold to Kaiser Co., Inc., of Seattle, Wash., for scrapping. LST-307 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 308

LST - 308 was laid down on 15 September 1942 at the Boston Navy Yard; launched on 9 November 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Elizabeth A. Haggerty; and commissioned on 2 January 1943. During World War II, LST-308 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 Following the war, LST-308 performed occupation duty in the Far East until late September 1946 and service in China in July and August 1946. Upon her return to the United States, she was decommissioned on 17 October 1946. On 5 December 1947, the ship was transferred to the State Department for disposition. LST-308 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 309

LST - 309 was laid down on 22 September 1942 at the Boston Navy Yard; launched on 23 November 1942; sponsored by Miss Mildred M. Leydon; and commissioned on 11 January 1943, Lt. C. A. Lanborn, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-309 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the following operations: Sicilian occupation-July 1943 Salerno landings-September 1943 Invasion of Normandy-June 1944 Following the war, LST-309 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early November 1945. Upon her return to the United States, the ship was decommissioned on 19 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 23 June 1947. On 1 June 1948, she was sold to the Humble Oil & Refining Co., Houston, Tex., and converted for merchant service. LST-309 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST - 310

LST - 310 was laid down on 22 September 1942 at the Boston Navy Yard; launched on 23 November 1942; sponsored by Mrs. Inga M. Gustavson; and commissioned on 20 January 1943, Lt. W. P. Lawless, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-310 was assigned to the European theater of war and participated in the Sicilian occupation in July 1943 and the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. Upon her return to the United States, she was decommissioned on 16 May 1945 and struck from the Navy list on 12 March 1946. On 28 January 1947, she was sold to the Boston Metals Co., of Baltimore, Md., for conversion to merchant service. LST- 310 earned two battle stars for World War II service


USS LST-29

USS LST-29 was a LST-1-class tank landing ship built for the U.S. Navy during World War II. She was designed to carry troops and military equipment to the shores of the battle front and quickly deliver her cargo. She served in the Pacific Ocean and post-war returned home proudly with four battle stars to her credit.

She was laid down 8 January 1943 at Dravo Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania launched, 17 May 1943 and commissioned as USS LST-29, 10 July 1943.


Is Drexel Furniture Still in Business?

Sadly, Drexel Furniture is no longer in business. After many acquisitions and mergers by various parent groups, Drexel Furniture no longer manufacturers furniture. Additionally, as of 2020, no company has produced furniture under the Drexel name. In other words, it appears that no company currently licenses furniture using the Drexel Company identity.

Heritage Home Group, which was the most recent parent company to own Drexel, filed for bankruptcy in 2018. HHG owned other great American brands such as Henredon Furniture, Hickory Chair and Maitland Smith.

Perhaps in the future, other established manufacturers or large parent companies will find a reason to resuscitate the Drexel Brand. After all, Drexel Furniture has a long history, a devoted following, and a great reputation.

So, let’s look at the company’s history and what made them great!


Index: L - Z

This free content was digitised by double rekeying. All rights reserved.

Labour Church, 63, 249

Labour party, 46, 50, 120, 123, 217- 18, 226

Laing:
-, Eliz., 238
-, J. F., vicar of St. Michael's, Walsall, 238-9

Lambert's End, see Bromwich, West

Lambeth (Surr.), 117 and see Brixton

Lancashire, see Ashton-under-Lyne Liverpool Rochdale St. Helens Salford Warrington Wigan

Lancashire Insurance Co., 49

Lander, — (fl. c. 1825), 104

Lane:
-, Chas., 105, 107-8
-, Edw., minister of All Saints', West Bromwich, 52
-, Josiah, 37
-, Mary, see Birch
-, Thos., 271
-, Thos., his grds., 216, 271
-, fam., 105

Langley, N. T., vicar of St. John's, West Bromwich, 58

Langthorne (in Bedale, Yorks. N.R.), 270

Lapley, see Wheaton Aston

Latimer, Eliz. le, m. John de Neville, Lord Neville, 171

Latter-day Saints (Mormons), 63, 131, 244, 282

Lavender:
-, G. L., 192
-, H. E., architect, 223, 233, 267, 282

Lavender & Twentyman, architects, 239

Lawley:
-, Sir Fra., 216
-, Sir Rob. (d. 1793), 101
-, Sir Rob., later Baron Wenlock (d. 1832), 101

Leamore, see Bloxwich

leather trades, 30-1, 151, 153, 156, 199, 202-4, 220, 266

Leathercraft, Museum of, see London

Leckie, J. A., M.P., 218, 226, 275

Lees:
-, Fred., 109
-, Jos., 109

Legge:
-, Augustus, bp. of Lichfield, 3
-, Geo., earl of Dartmouth (d. 1810), 16, 20, 40
-, Gerald Humphry, earl of Dart- mouth, 18, 55
-, Humphry, earl of Dartmouth (d. 1962), 60
-, Wm., Baron Dartmouth, later earl of Dartmouth (d. 1750), 3, 18- 19, 29, 39-40, 43 n, 44, 51, 129
-, Wm., earl of Dartmouth (d. 1801), 3, 12, 19-20, 22 n, 35, 41, 52, 63-4, 106
-, Wm., earl of Dartmouth (d. 1853), 3, 5, 16, 18, 20-2, 31, 33, 40, 43, 45, 48, 52-6, 69, 75-6, 78, 82, 106
-, Wm., earl of Dartmouth (d. 1958), 18, 50, 60
-, as Vct. Lewisham, 5, 50
-, Wm. Heneage, earl of Dartmouth (d. 1936), 5, 30, 73, 93
-, Wm. Wal., earl of Dartmouth (d. 1891), 5, 20, 46, 53-4, 59, 75- 6, 78, 83, 105, 115, 126
-, as Vct. Lewisham, 20
-, fam., 3

Leicestershire, see Gopsall Lough- borough Wigston Parva

Leigh:
-, Sir Edw. (d. 1617), 176
-, Sir Edw. (d. 1671), 247, 250
-, Edw. (fl. 1718), 176
-, Esther, w. of Wm., 176
-, Hen., 176 n
-, Wm., 176
-, fam., 176-7

Leighswood mineral rly., 278

Leominster (Herefs.), 174

Lester:
-, W. M., 246
-, W. M., & Sons Ltd., 194

Lewisham, vcts., see Legge

Lewisham, see Sydenham

Liberal party, 46, 50, 72, 217, 226, 252 and see National Liberals

Lichfield, 11, 24 n, 47, 57, 125, 146, 178, 222
-, bps. of, 51, 55-60, 125, 127, 238-9 and see Legge Selwyn
-, cath., 229
-, canons, see Kynnardessey Reynold Ridell
-, chantries, 27, 177, 180, 279
-, chapter, 124-5, 226
-, dean, see Yotton
-, obits, 27
-, vicars choral, 26-7
-, the Close, 3
-, man., 98, 118
-, Midland Truant (later Beacon) Sch., 254-5
-, museum, 219 n
-, New College, 27
-, St. Mary's guild, 180
-, St. Michael's par., see Fisherwick Pipehill
-, synods at, 50

Lichfield and Coventry, bp. of, see Ryder

Lichfield and Tamworth parl. constituency, 225

Lichfield Diocesan Schools Society, 77

Lilleshall (Salop.), 190

limestone-working, 152, 161, 168, 190-2

Lincolnshire, see Barton-upon- Humber

Little Aston, see Aston, Little

Little Bloxwich, see Bloxwich

Little Bromwich, see Bromwich, Little

Littleton:
-, Charlotte, see Rowley
-, Edw. Geo. Percy, Baron Hatherton (d. 1930), 151-2, 163, 239
-, Edw. John (formerly Walhouse), Baron Hatherton (d. 1863), 20, 151, 153, 160-1, 177, 192-3, 236
-, Edw. Ric., Baron Hatherton (d. 1888), 151-3, 153 n, 161, 164, 190, 226, 239, 246 n
-, John, 16
-, fam., 23
-, and see Lyttelton

Llangollen (Denb.), 255
-, Bryntysilio Outdoor Education Centre, 255

lock-making, 164, 195-6, 198-200

London, 50, 109, 111, 195
-, as address, 16, 18, 128-9, 173-6, 196, 218, 222, 229, 232-6, 238-9, 252, 255, 257, 269-70, 272, 279
-, bp. of, see Foliot
-, Clement's Inn, 174
-, Exhibitions:
-, Great (1851), 111
-, International (1862), 202
-, Holborn, 69
-, Museum of Leathercraft, 252
-, plague, 220

London & Birmingham Railway, 110

Lones, Raybould & Vernon, 112

Lones, Vernon & Holden, 112, 113

Long, Alfred, architect, 131

Long Itchington, see Bascote

Longmore, Mary, w. of Dr. Tom, 175

Longthorpe (in St. John's, Peter- borough, Northants.), 179

Lord Hay's branch canal, 168

Lords Hay, see Essington

Loughborough (Leics.), 233

Lowe:
-, Alex., 21, 32
-, Alice, see Shelton
-, Eliz., 21, 23
-, Humph., 16
-, Jesson, 20-1, 32
-, John (d. 1702), 23, 35, 67
-, John (d. 1729), 23 n
-, John (d. 1740), 23, 32
-, Paul, 23 n
-, Sam. (d. 1741), 23 n
-, Sam. (d. 1783), 23
-, Sarah, 21
-, fam., 67

Loxton:
-, Bros. (S. and J.), architects, 65, 245-6, 251
-, S., architect, 282

Lyddiatt (Lyddyat):
-, Chas., 107
-, Hugh, 190
-, John, 202, 269

Lyle:
-, John, 214
-, Wm., 214, 266

Lynch, J. T., architect, 61, 241

Lyndene (Bloxwich) Co. Ltd., 202

Lyndon, see Bromwich, West

Lyttelton:
-, Sir Hen., 108
-, Sir John, 108
-, and see Littleton

Mackey, — (fl. c. 1882), 95

Maclean, John, & Sons Ltd., 175

Madin, John, Design Group, 5, 59

Manchester, see Salford

Manifold Printing Co., 71

March (Marche):
-, John, 177
-, Ric., 196

Marchall (Marchal), see Marshall

Marchis:
-, Emme le, 173
-, Thos. le, 173
-, Wal., 173

Markwick, W. F., architect, 242

Marlow:
-, Thos. (fl. c. 1870), 238
-, Thos. (fl. c. 1901, ? another), 239

Marnham, de:
-, Isabel, see Freeman
-, John (fl. 1327), 15
-, John (d. by c. 1420), 15
-, Marg., see Bromwich
-, Margery, 15
-, Ric (d. c. 1295), 15, 30
-, Ric. (d. by 1347), 15
-, Wm., 15
-, fam., 17

Marryatville (S. Australia), 275

Marshall (Marchal, Marchall):
-, Hen., 213 n
-, Ric., 194
-, Wm. (fl. 1404-5), 194
-, Wm. (fl. 1834-64), 99

Marson:
-, Hen., 60
-, Sarah Anne, 60

Martin & Chamberlain, architects, 48

Martyn, Fra., Rom. Cath. priest, 61, 240

Mason:
-, Jas. Rooker (fl. 1834), 208
-, Jas. Rooker (fl. 1871, ? another), 174
-, T., & Sons Ltd., 118
-, Titus, 118

Maw Green, see Walsall

Maxstoke (Warws.), Castle, 106

Mayer's Green, see Bromwich, West

Mears, Thos., bell-founder, 233, 236

Mears & Stainbank, bell-founders, 236

Mellish:
-, Frances, see Buchanan
-, Sir Geo., 152
-, fam., 152

Merchant Taylors' Company, 233, 234, 255, 270

Mercury Securities Ltd., 194

Merevale (Warws.), abbot of, 229

Merry Hill, see Smethwick

Messiah (oratorio), 103

metal-working, 30-9, 65, 107 n, 109- 15, 171, 185, 192-202, 280
-, and see bedstead ind. boiler- making brass ind. buckle- making chain-making engineering gun-making hollowware ind. horse-furniture ind. iron manufacture nailing plating steel manufacture tube-making

Methodist Episcopal Church of the United States of America, 4

Methodists, 4, 57, 63-7, 76-7, 79, 84-5, 131-4, 137, 139, 236, 241, 244-7, 259-60, 264, 282

Middlemore:
-, Ric., 179
-, fam., 22

Middlesex, see Hornsey Laleham

Middleton:
-, Jas., 112, 127
-, John, 33
-, Thos., 112

Midland Aeroquipment Ltd., 245

Midland Christian Union, 70

Midland District, vicars apostolic of (Rom. Cath.), 240

Midland Motor Cylinder Co. Ltd., 114

Midland Printing Co., 72

'Midland Red', see Birmingham and Midland Motor Omnibus Co.

Midland United Newspapers Ltd., 73

Midlands Electricity Board, 49, 122, 225

Miller, Jas., Wesleyan Methodist minister, 245 n

Mills:
-, Bridget, 273
-, Wm., Ltd., 114

Milton and Elsecar Ironworks, see Wath upon Dearn

Milward, F., & Son Ltd., 205

Miners' Welfare Committee, 163

Ministers, Trustees for Maintenance of, 51

Mitchell:
-, Arthur, 142
-, Harry, 126, 135-6
-, Hen., 117, 136, 142
-, Hen., & Co., 117, 122, 135
-, J. E., 142
-, Sir John, 124
-, Wm., (Pens) Ltd., 118
-, fam., 126, 142

Mitchells & Butlers Ltd., 22, 113, 117-18, 127, 142, 206

Mitton, E. S., architect, 130

moated sites, 18, 163, 171-3, 175, 179

Moilliet:
-, Amelia, see Keir
-, J. L., 103-5
-, Jas., 105, 137
-, —, w. of Jas., 137

Mollesley:
-, Margery, w. of Thos., 266
-, Rog. de, 177
-, Thos., 13, 214, 228, 266

Mollesley's Dole, 145, 147, 153-7, 159, 161, 163-4, 266-7, 277

Mond Nickel Co. Ltd., 117

Monmouthshire, see Cwmbran

Montagu, mchnss. of, see Ingaldesthorpe

Moore (More):
-, Phoebe, w. of Ralph, m. 2 Ric. Parker, 85
-, Ralph, 85
-, Rob., 210 n

Morgan, T. H., Baptist minister, 104

Mormons, see Latter-day Saints

Morris:
-, Jos., 117
-, Thos., 32
-, Wm., 32

Morteyn, de:
-, Emecina, see Rous
-, Eustace, 169 n
-, Sir Rog., 169, 171, 173, 184, 186, 192, 212
-, Wm., 169, 170 n, 180
-, Sir Wm., 169, 171, 184

Moseley (in Bushbury), 22

Mosley (Moseley):
-, O. E. (later Sir Oswald), 123
-, Rob., 273

Moss, A. W., architect, 132

Mothering Sunday, 131

motor ind., 38, 114, 198, 200

motorways:
-, M5, 1, 6, 10-13, 96, 98
-, M6, 6, 12-13, 96, 167-8, 172

Mountfort:
-, Sir Baldwin, 171
-, Edm., 171
-, Sir Edw. (d. 1632), 172, 239
-, Edw. (d. 1672), 172, 240
-, Eliz., w. of Edw., 172, 240
-, Eliz., m. 1 Thos. Harris (fl. 1684), 2 Jonas Slaney (d. by 1727), 172
-, Fra., 172
-, Joan, w. of Wm. (d. 1452), 171
-, Rob., 171
-, Sir Sim. (d. 1495), 15 n, 171
-, Sim. (d. by 1548), 172
-, Sim. (d. 1664), 172, 239-40
-, Sim. (d. c. 1672), 172
-, Thos., 171
-, Wm. (d. 1452), 171, 173
-, Wm. (d. 1610), 172
-, —, w. of Sir Edw., 239
-, —, w. of Wm., 239

Mountrath:
-, ctss. of, see Newport
-, earl of, see Coote

Moxhull (in Wishaw, Warws.), 266

Moxley (in Wednesbury), 121

Much Wenlock, see Wenlock, Much

Muckley Corner, see Pipehill

Munns, —, Baptist minister, 106

Muntz:
-, Geo. Fred., 20, 88, 100-1, 111
-, G. F., his s., 111
-, G. F., & Co., 94, 111
-, P. H., 100

Muntz's Metal Co. Ltd., 111, 114

Murchison, R. I. (later Sir Roderick), 40

Murray:
-, David Christie, 3-4
-, Hen., 4

Naden, Thos., architect, 237

nailing, 34-5, 61, 107, 109, 113, 194-5, 199, 277, 280

Nantgwynant (Caernarvons.), Plas Gwynant Adventure School, 75

National Coal Board Mineworkers' Pension Fund, 5

National Liberals, 226

National Unionists, 50

Needle Industries Group, 199

Nether Haddon, see Haddon, Nether

Nettlefold & Chamberlain, 113, 140

Nettlefolds Ltd., 113, 135

Neville:
-, Anne, see Beauchamp
-, Eliz., see Latimer
-, Eliz., m. Thos. le Scrope, Lord Scrope of Upsall, 18
-, Isabel, see Ingaldesthorpe

New Church, see Swedenborgians

New Delaville Spelter Co. Ltd., 194

New Testament Church of God, 249

New Town, see Bromwich, West

Newcastle-under-Lyme, 219

Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 61

Newnes, Geo. (later Sir Geo.), 88

Newport:
-, Diana, m. Algernon Coote, earl of Mountrath, 170
-, Mary, see Wilbraham
-, Ric., earl of Bradford, 170, 185
-, Thos., earl of Bradford, 170

Newport, Vct., see Bridgeman

Newsham, J. H., vicar of Holy Trinity, Smethwick, 125

Newtown, see Essington

Nichols, G. B., architect, 5, 126, 131, 218

Nichols & Morgan, architects, 251

Nicholson:
-, Chas. Hen., organ-builder, 207
-, Maria, organ-builder, 207

Nicholson & Lord (later Nicholson & Lord (Walsall) Ltd.), organ- builders, 207

Nicholson & Son, organ-builders, 207

Nicklin, Jas. C., Ltd., 130

Nicoll, Frances Cath. Gunter, m. Wm. Legge, earl of Dartmouth (d. 1801), 20

Nightingale:
-, John, 231
-, Jos., 206

Nock:
-, John, 42, 116
-, fam., 67

Noell:
-, Edw., 179
-, Jas., 179

Norfolk, duke of, see Howard

North Harborne, see Smethwick

Northam, see Appledore

Northamptonshire, 39 and see Corby Longthorpe

Northfield (Worcs., later mainly Bir- mingham), 99
-, Weoley Castle, 14, 15 n

Northumberland, duke of, see Dudley

Northumberland, see Newcastle-upon- Tyne

Norton, King's (Worcs., later mainly Birmingham), 103, 146
-, Moseley Hall, 103
-, poor-law union, 119

Norton Canes, 228, 255 and see Brownhills

Norton-under-Cannock United Dis- trict school board, 283

Norwich Union Fire Office, 224

Oakley & Coulson, architects, 135

Ocker Hill (in Tipton), 14, 98

office equipment, manufacture of, 38

Offini, de:
-, Christine, w. of Guy, 50
-, Geva, w. of Ric. s. of Wm. s. of Guy, 15 n
-, Guy, 15, 26, 50
-, Ralph, s. of Guy, 50
-, Ric. s. of Guy, 15 n, 50
-, Ric. s. of Wm. s. of Guy, 15, 51
-, Ric. s. of Wm. s. of Ric., see Brom- wich
-, Wm. s. of Guy, 15, 18
-, Wm. s. of Wm. s. of Guy, 15

Ogley Hay, see Brownhills

Ogley Hay and Brownhills Gas Co. Ltd., 281

Old End, see Bromwich, West

Old Hall Tableware Ltd., 201

Old Swinford, see Swinford, Old

Oldbury (in Halesowen, Salop. and Worcs.), 21, 24, 45-6, 71, 87, 89, 92, 109, 119, 121, 129
-, Bromford, q.v.
-, Bromford Colliery, 25
-, burial board, 122
-, chap., 67
-, educ., 139, 141
-, ind., 30, 106, 117
-, man., 30
-, mill, 30, 109
-, newspapers, 72, 135
-, Prot. nonconf., 131
-, public health, 121
-, rly., 14
-, Rom. Cath., 61
-, Rood End, 141
-, Tat Bank, 98
-, trams, 49-50
-, Victoria Rd., 92
-, Wallexhall, 30

Oratory, Congregation of the, 129

organ-builders, see Avery Dresser Green Hawkins Holt Nicholson Smith Stanton

Osborne:
-, Geo., Presbyterian minister, 67, 72
-, Wm., 72

Oscott (in Handsworth), 240

Osney (Oxon.), abbot of, 182

Overend, see Bromwich, West

Owen, Josiah, Presbyterian minister, 145

Owen & Ward, architects, 71, 134

Oxford, 40
-, Cardinal Coll., 18, 26, 51
-, St. John's Coll., 234

Oxfordshire, 39 and see Holton Osney

packing-cases, manufacture of, 208

Packing Supplies (Walsall) Ltd., 208

Paget:
-, Thos., Baron Paget, 190
-, Wm., Baron Paget, 190
-, fam., 98

Pakistanis, 3, 71, 88, 135, 145, 249

Palmer:
-, Phil., 115
-, Thos., 115

Pankhurst, Christabel, 123

Parker:
-, Dorothy, w. of Nic., 172
-, Jeremiah, 31, 34
-, John, 229, 234, 236, 270
-, Mary, see Hawe
-, Nic. (d. 1627), 215, 271
-, Nic. (fl. early 1660s), 173
-, Nic. (fl. 1728), 172
-, Phoebe, see Moore
-, Ric., 85
-, Rob. (d. c. 1625), 233, 270
-, Rob. (d. 1806), 178
-, Thos., 178
-, Thos. Hawe, 178, 269
-, Wm. (d. 1616), 225, 234, 255, 269
-, Wm. (fl. 1813), 199

Parkes:
-, Dorothy, 89, 103, 123-4, 129, 137, 142
-, Sir Harry Smith, 145
-, Philemon, 83
-, Ric., 33
-, Thos. (d. 1602), 29, 32-3, 38-9, 190
-, Thos. (fl. 1618), 33, 184
-, Thos. (fl. later 17th cent.), 123
-, — (fl. c. 1860), 41

Parsons:
-, Rob., 175
-, Wal., 3

Partridge (Partriche, Partrydge):
-, Hen., 28
-, John, 35
-, fam., 240 n

Patent Nut and Bolt Co. Ltd., 37, 113, 130

Patent Urban Manure Co. Ltd., 207

Patshull, Patshull Hall, 20

Pattison, Dorothy Wyndlow (Sister Dora), 145, 149, 222-3, 225

Paynel:
-, Gervase, 15
-, John, 169
-, Margery, see Rous
-, Ric., 155

Peake:
-, E. C., 193
-, W. A., 193

Pearman Smith, W. J. (later Sir Wm.), 154

Pearsall:
-, John, 100
-, Thos. (d. 1714), 100, 107
-, Thos. (d. 1759), 100
-, and see Peshall

Pearson:
-, J. L., architect, 236
-, Mrs., 247

Pearte, Eliz., m. 1 Wm. Flaxall, 2 Wm. Walker, 177

Pelsall (in St. Peter's, Wolverhampton), 176, 212, 221, 270

Pelsall Tool and Engineering Co. Ltd., 280

Pen Moel, see Tidenham

Pendeford (in Tettenhall), Hall, 100

Penkridge, 225
-, stone, 239

Penny:
-, Jos., 142
-, Mary Ann, w. of Jos., 142

Perkins, E., & Co. Ltd., 208

Perrot, F. D., assistant curate of Holy Trinity, Smethwick, 135

Perry:
-, F. C., 193
-, John, Rom. Cath. priest, 240

Perry Barr, see Barr, Perry

Persehouse:
-, Eliz., m, Rob. Burgis, 177
-, Eliz., see Walker
-, Humph., 172 n, 233, 273
-, John (d. 1605), 177, 250
-, John (d. 1636), 155, 177, 182-4, 186, 190, 209, 214, 229, 267, 271
-, John (d. 1667 or 1668), 177, 182, 190, 269
-, John (d. 1713), 177, 216
-, John (d. by 1735), 177
-, Ric. (d. 1650), 177
-, Ric. (d. 1771), 177
-, Wm., 177, 216, 244
-, fam., 191, 250

Peshall (formerly Pearsall), Revd. John, 100

Peterborough (Northants.), see Long-thorpe

Phillips, J. A., & Co. Ltd., 114

Piddock (Piddocke), see Cowper

Piercy:
-, Grace, 25
-, J. H. W., 25
-, John Edwards, 25, 41

pig-keeping, 8, 28, 46-7, 120-1, 220

Pilkington, Alfred, architect, 129

Pincher, Edw., architect, 48, 65, 71, 132

Pipehill (in St. Michael's, Lichfield), Muckley Corner, 165

Pirton:
-, Dorothy, see Cockayne
-, Wm., 179

Plas Gwynant Adventure School, see Nantgwynant

Plastics Products Co., 208

Pleasant Sunday Afternoon movement 68

Plundered Ministers, Committee for, 227

Plymouth, 179-80
-, dockyard, 25

Pole, Wm. de la, marquess of Suffolk, 228

Pope:
-, John, & Sons, 108
-, Luke, 103, 107-8
-, fam., 92, 103

Port Sunlight (in Bebington, Ches.), 42

Potter:
-, Peter, 145, 147, 151, 154, 264
-, fam., 209

Powell:
-, Thos., 33
-, Miss, 69
-, fam., 100
-, and see Allen

Pratt:
-, Phil., jr., 227
-, Phil., sr., 227
-, fam., 186

Presbyterians, later United Reformed Church, 52 n, 63, 67-8, 72, 83, 133, 145, 215, 247-8, 257

Prescot (Lancs.), see St. Helens

Preston, — (fl. later 18th cent.), 227

Prestwode, de:
-, Hen., 186
-, John, 186

Prestwood (in Kingswinford), 67, 98 Ho., 83, 85

Pretty:
-, Thos., 176
-, Wm., 173
-, Winefrid (née Cowley), 176

Price:
-, Eliz., w. of Thos., m. 2 — Beckett, 176
-, John (fl. 1746), 186
-, John (fl. later 18th cent.), 176
-, Sam., 197
-, Thos. (d. by 1756), 176
-, Thos. (d. 1822), 31, 191
-, Thos. (d. 1826), 176
-, fam., 22, 31

Priestley:
-, J. B., writer, 10
-, Sam., 174

Primitive Christians, 249

Pritchard, H. L., and his w., 129

Protestant Evangelical Church, 133

Prot. nonconf., see Birmingham Bloxwich Bromwich, West Delves Great Bridge Handsworth Smethwick Walsall Walsall Wood

Providence Young Men's Bible Class, 133

Purcell:
-, Edw., and his w., 240
-, Thos., 240
-, fam., 240

Purefey:
-, Anne, see Ashton
-, Gamaliel, 175

Queen Anne's Bounty, 52, 56-7, 126, 234, 237

Queen Mary (liner), 202

Quinton, the (in Halesowen, Salop. and Worcs.), 128-9

Rabone:
-, Edw., 105
-, Ric., 105, 137 n

Randle, Fred., architect, 129

Ray Hall (formerly in Great Barr in Aldridge, later in West Bromwich), 47

Reignolds, see Reynolds

Reynold:
-, Thos., canon of Lichfield cath., 27
-, Wm., 177

Reynolds (Reignolds):
-, E. F., architect, 129
-, Geo., 206
-, Hannah, 206
-, John (fl. 1625), 32
-, John, Presbyterian minister (d. 1683), 247
-, John, Presbyterian minister (d. 1727), 145
-, John (d. 1820), 99-100, 104
-, John, his s., 99-100

Ribbesford (Worcs.), 137

Richard, unidentified prior, 27

Richards:
-, H. S., 117
-, H. S., Ltd., 117
-, John, 23
-, John, his s., 23
-, Sam., 23

Richmond:
-, ctss. of, see Beaufort
-, duke of, see fitz Roy

Rickerscote (in Castle Church), 273

Ridell, John, canon of Lichfield cath., 27

Rider:
-, Nic. (b. 1579), 21 n
-, Nic. (fl. 1650s and 1660s), 31
-, Nic. (d. 1703), 31
-, Rob. (d. 1561-2), 21, 31
-, Rob. (d. c. 1579), 21
-, Rob. (d. 1646), 21
-, Sim., 21, 60
-, fam., 31, 34, 60
-, and see Ryder

Ridgacre branch canal, 14, 29

Ridware, Wm., rector of Swynnerton, 268

Ridyard, Edna (née Whitehouse), 24

Riley, Fleet & Newey, 8

Rio-Tinto Zinc Corporation Ltd., 194

riots, 63, 67, 145-6, 182, 223, 244, 248, 267

Rivers, Lord, see Wydevill

Robert the schoolmaster, 254

Roberts:
-, Chas., 191
-, J. G., vicar of St. Mary's, Bear- wood, Smethwick, 128
-, Jas., 5, 36
-, Ric., 104

Robinson:
-, J. R., 251-2
-, Ric., 273
-, Sarah, probably w. of Thos., 117
-, Thos. (fl. 1841), 117
-, Thos. (fl. 1850s), 117

Robinson Bros. Ltd., 43

Robinson Chemicals Ltd., 207

Rochford:
-, Joan, see Hillary
-, Sir John, 171

Rogers, —, architect, 68

Romaine, Revd. Wm., 64 n

Roman Catholicism, see Aldridge Bloxwich Bromwich, West Delves Smethwick Walsall Walsall Wood

Rood End, see Oldbury

Roos:
-, Joan, 173
-, Rob., 173

Roper, Thos., vicar of Holy Trinity, Smethwick, 125

Ross:
-, Jos., 195
-, Matt., 195
-, Thos., 195

Rotton Park, see Birmingham

Rous, le (Ruffus):
-, Alice, m. Nic. l'Archer, 169-70
-, Emecina, m. 1 Geof. de Bakepuse, 2 Wm. de Morteyn, 169, 171, 184
-, Herb., 169, 180
-, Isabel, w. of Sir Wm., 184
-, Joan, w. of John, 279
-, John, 279
-, Margery (la Rousse), m. 1 Ric. de Alazun, 2 John Paynel, 169- 71, 173, 182, 184-5
-, Ric., 169
-, Sir Thos., 170, 172-3, 184-5, 187, 189, 212, 279
-, Wm. (d. by c. 1177), 169
-, Sir Wm., 169-71, 180, 182, 184, 186-7, 212, 226
-, fam., 169

Roway branch canal, see Union (Roway) branch canal

Roway (Row Hay) Brook, 1 n

Rowley, Charlotte, m. Edw. Geo. Percy Littleton, Baron Hatherton, 152

Rowley Regis, 46, 118 and see Brades Village

Ruabon (Denb.), brick from, 61

Rudhall, Thos., bell-founder, 233

Runcorn (Ches.), see Aston (in Runcorn)

Rupert, Prince, Count Palatine of the Rhine, 89

Rushall, 143, 169, 174, 176, 210, 212-14, 217, 228-9, 250, 269-71
-, the Butts, see Walsall
-, Calderfields Farm, 152
-, chars. for poor, 267, 270-1
-, ch., 226-7, 238
-, Daw End, q.v.
-, Hall, 146, 152, 174, 247
-, Holbrook field, 180
-, ind., 33, 190-1
-, man., lord of, 267
-, mill, 166
-, Moss Close, 152
-, parl. hist., 225
-, rds., 165 and n, 225
-, Ryecroft, see Walsall
-, vicar of, see Slaney

Russell:
-, A. C., 201
-, Edw., 193, 201
-, J. G., 201
-, John & Co. Ltd., 193, 201
-, T. A., 201

Russell Bros. (later Russell Bros. (Walsall) Ltd.), 201

Ruycroft, Thos. s. of Rob. de, 173

Ryder:
-, C. E., Rom. Cath. priest, 129
-, Hen., bp. of Lichfield and Coventry, 129, 234
-, and see Rider

Ryders Green, see Bromwich, West

Ryecroft, see Walsall

Sacheverell:
-, Anna Maria, see Brearley
-, Chas., 101

saddlery, see leather trades

St. Helens (in Prescot, Lancs.), 116

St. John:
-, Fra., 179
-, Mary, m. Sir John Bernard, 179
-, Mary, see Wakering

St. Paul, Sir Horace, 22, 57

St. Paul, Sisters of Charity of, 61, 76, 241, 258

St. Philip Neri, see Neri

St. Quentin Canal (France), 158

Salford (in Manchester), 88

Salter:
-, Geo. (d. 1849), 56
-, Geo. (d. 1917), 55, 85
-, Geo., & Co. Ltd., 10, 36-8, 74, 82, 85
-, John, 103
-, Thos. Bache, 10, 74
-, Thos. Hen., 83
-, Wm., 72
-, fam., 10, 35-6

Saltley (in Aston, Warws), 112

Salvation Army, 69-70, 130, 133, 248

sand-quarrying, 158, 161

Sanders, T. W., architect, 282

Sandwell, see Bromwich, West

Sandwell, metropolitan boro. of, 46, 120, 266

Sandwell Park Colliery Co., 41, 106, 115

Saxony, duke of, see Henry the Lion

Scott:
-, Sir Edw. Dolman, 191
-, Hannah, 103
-, John (fl. 1753-66), 175
-, John (fl. 1754, ? another), 207
-, Capt. Jonathan, 243
-, Mary, & Co., 207
-, Ric. (fl. 1719-22), 175
-, Ric. (fl. 1754), 207
-, Thos., 207
-, Wm. (fl. 1624), 175
-, Wm. (fl. 1661-72, ? another), 175

Scrope of Upsall, Eliz., Lady, see Neville

Seabridge (in Stoke-upon-Trent), 229

Sedgley, 31, 240 n
-, Coseley, q.v.
-, Gornal, Upper, q.v.
-, Willingsworth Hall, 33

Seighford, 190 and see Bridgeford

Selwyn:
-, Geo. Augustus, bp. of Lichfield, 53
-, Laetitia Frances, 83

Seventh-day Adventists, 70, 248

Shackerley (in Donington, Salop.), 193

Shakespeare:
-, Benj., 106
-, Wm., 102

Shannon:
-, Edm. John, 175, 179, 205
-, John, 175, 204-5
-, John, & Son Ltd., 205
-, John C., 205

Sharpe:
-, E. F., 198
-, John, architect, 60

Shavers End Brook, see Shelfield Brook

Sheepwash (in Tipton and West Bromwich), 8-9, 12, 31, 69, 76

Sheffield:
-, Edm., Baron Sheffield (d. 1549), 174
-, Edm., Baron Sheffield (d. 1646), 179
-, Ellen, w. of Sir Rob. (d. 1517), 173-4
-, John, Baron Sheffield, 173-4
-, Sir Rob. (d. 1517), 174
-, Sir Rob. (d. 1531), 174

Sheldon (Warws., later mainly Birmingham), 175

Shelfield:
-, Eleanor, m. Wm. Burgess, 179
-, Wm., 179

Shelfield, see Walsall Wood

Shelfield (or Shavers End) Brook, 275, 277 n, 278, 280

Shelton:
-, Alice, m. Humph. Lowe, 16
-, John (d. 1665), 16, 67
-, John (d. 1714), 16-17, 32-3
-, Jos., 16, 44
-, Sir Ric., 16, 32
-, fam., 40, 60 n

Shenstone, 21, 75, 176, 254
-, Aston, Little, q.v.
-, Shenstone Moss, 100
-, Stonnall, q.v.
-, Streetly, q.v.

Sheppard, Ric., Robson & Partners, architects, 266

Shipley (in Claverley, Salop.), 189

Shipley & Foster, architects, 233

Shire Oak, see Walsall Wood

Shireland Brook (also Bear Stream and Cape of Good Hope Stream), 87

Shirley (in Solihull, Warws.), 114

Showell:
-, Wal., 71
-, Wal., & Son Ltd., 71 n

Shrewsbury, earl of, see Talbot

Shrewsbury, 204
-, battle of, 228

Shropshire, 38-9, 96 and see Albrighton Broseley Dawley Halesowen Lilleshall Newport Shackerley Shipley Shrewsbury Spoonhill

Shropshire, Worcestershire and Staffordshire Electric Power Co., 122

Siemens:
-, Werner, 111
-, Wm. (later Sir Wm.), 88, 111

Sikhs, 88, 129, 134, 136, 249

Silvester:
-, Ethel, 56
-, Geo., 56, 77
-, John, 126

Simcox (Symcox):
-, John, 23 n
-, Josiah, 23
-, Thos., 64
-, Thos. Green, vicar of Holy Trinity, Smethwick, 125-6

Simon, bp. of Worcester, 50

Simpson, Astbury & Co., 111 n

Sinkinson & Lancaster, 193

Sisters of Charity of St. Paul, see St. Paul

Skeffington:
-, Alice, w. of John (d. 1604), 15
-, Sir John (d. 1525), 174, 279
-, John (d. 1604), 15, 24, 173-4, 279
-, Sir John (d. 1651), 173
-, Sir John (fl. 1652-61), 173
-, Sir Ric., 173
-, Wm. (d. 1551), 279
-, Sir Wm. (d. 1635), 15, 173-4, 176, 279
-, Sir Wm. (d. 1652), 173
-, fam., 15

Slaney:
-, Eliz., see Mountfort
-, John, 173
-, Jonas (fl. 1706), 180
-, Jonas (d. by 1727, ? another), 172, 233
-, Jonas (d. 1762-3), 172
-, Jonas (fl. 1764), 189
-, Jonas, vicar of Rushall by 1778, 172
-, Mary, w. of Revd. Jonas, 172

Slater, Jas., and his w. Eliz., 172

smallpox, 46, 48, 121, 221, 223

Smethwick, 87-142
-, agric., 107-8
-, Allen Everitt Works, 114
-, alms-hos., 142
-, Aspers Moor, 107 n
-, baths, 121, 136
-, beadle, 119
-, the Beakes, 99-100
-, Beakes Farm, 99-100
-, Bearwood:
-, baths, 121, 136
-, Bear inn, 96, 104, 128
-, bus garage, 122
-, ch., 128
-, cinema (later theatre), 134-5
-, educ., 139, 141
-, growth, 96
-, mill, 109
-, Prot. nonconf., 130, 132
-, rds., 97
-, Rom. Cath., 129
-, woodland, 108
-, Bearwood Hill, 88-9, 97, 110, 131, 134
-, Bell Ho., 96
-, Berwood Cottage (Blood Hall), 94
-, Berwoods Hill Farm, see Smethwick, Pool Farm
-, Birmingham Tile and Pottery Works, see Smethwick, Ruskin Pottery
-, Black Patch Pk., 94
-, Blakeley Hall farm, 92, 115
-, Blood Hall, see Smethwick, Berwood Cottage
-, Blossoms End, see Smethwick, Bosoms End
-, board of health, 119, 121-2
-, boro., 119-20
-, arms, 120
-, Bosoms (Blossoms) End, 89
-, bridges, see Smethwick, communications
-, Britannia Bedstead Works, 127
-, Broomfield Ho., 131
-, buses, see Smethwick, public transport
-, canals, see Smethwick, communications
-, Cape Hill:
-, Cape of Good Hope inn, 94
-, cinema, 135
-, fair, 134
-, growth, 94-5
-, ind., 113, 117-18
-, institute, 140
-, Prot. nonconf., 131, 133
-, sch., 138
-, woodland, 108
-, Cape Hill Brewery, 113, 117-18, 135
-, Capethorn, 89
-, cemeteries, 122
-, Chance Technical Coll., see Smethwick, Municipal Coll.
-, chars. for poor, 141-2
-, chs., frontispiece, 92, 123-9, 124, 142
-, clergy, see Addenbrooke Boyse Crump Edmonds-Smith Ferguson Gardner Newsham Perrot Roberts Roper Simcox
-, churchwardens, 118
-, cinemas, 134-5
-, City Tube and Conduit Mills, 114
-, commission of peace, 119
-, communications, 96-8
-, bridges, 96, 97-8
-, canals, 87, 96, 97-8, 105, 109, 113
-, rlys., 87-8, 91-4, 96, 98, 101, 103, 106, 111-12, 115, 133
-, rds., 12, 89, 91, 93-4, 96-7, 119, 122
-, constables, 118-19
-, the Coppice, 100
-, Cornwall Works, 112
-, Council Ho., 120
-, ct. ho., 120
-, Cranford farm, see Smethwick, Piddocks farm
-, Credenda Works, 114
-, Crown Brewery, 117
-, educ., 88, 136-41
-, Sunday schs., 127, 130-3, 136, 138
-, electricity, 122
-, the Elms, 94
-, fire services, 122
-, the French Walls, 100, 107
-, the French Walls Works, 100-1, 110-11, 114
-, Galton Bridge, 96, 97
-, Galton Ho., 93
-, gas, 122
-, geology, 87
-, Grove Lane Works, 114
-, growth of town, 88-96
-, Hadley Ho., 93
-, Halford Works, 115
-, Harborne, North, see Smethwick, North Harborne
-, Harry Mitchell Pk., 89, 136
-, Hawthorn Works, 115
-, Heath Street Works, 113
-, highway surveyors, 119
-, Holly Ho., 101
-, Holly Lodge, 101
-, Holt Hill farm, 92
-, hosps., 121-2
-, housing, 88-9, 91-6, 101, 110, 120-1
-, slum clearance, 121
-, immigrants, 88, 115, 120, 123, 134-6
-, Imperial Mills, 113
-, inc., 107
-, ind., 87-8, 91-6, 100-1, 107 and n, 109-18, 112-13, 131, 133
-, inns, 107
-, Bear, see Smethwick, Bearwood
-, Blue Gates, 97
-, Cape of Good Hope, see Smethwick, Cape Hill
-, Crown, see Smethwick, West Smethwick
-, Greyhound, 135
-, London Works Tavern, 117
-, Moilliet Arms, 134
-, Old Chapel, 89
-, Old House at Home, 93
-, Old Talbot, 117
-, Red Cow, 89
-, Sow and Pigs, 89
-, Star, 119
-, Stour Valley, 134
-, Swan, see Smethwick, West Smethwick
-, White Gates, see Smethwick, West Smethwick
-, Kingston Sq., 120
-, Kingston Works, 114
-, the Laurels, 93
-, Lewisham Pk., 93
-, libraries, 97, 102, 118, 123, 134-5
-, Lightwood, 108
-, Lightwoods Ho., 101-2, 102
-, Lightwoods Pk., 102
-, local govt., 118-20
-, London Works, 110-11, 113
-, Manchester Works, 111
-, man., 98-100, 108
-, cts., 107, 118
-, mkts., 95
-, mayors, 120, 129
-, medical officer of health, 121
-, Merry Hill, 94
-, ind., 110, 116
-, Prot. nonconf., 131-2
-, Middlemore Industrial Estate, 112
-, Midland Nut and Bolt Works, 112
-, mills, 100-2, 108-10, 113
-, Municipal Coll. (later Chance Technical Coll.), 141
-, New Village, 88, 91, 94
-, Newlands Green, 89
-, newspapers, 135
-, North Harborne par., 88, 125-8, 138
-, Oakfield farm, 95
-, Old Chapel farm, 89
-, Old Smethwick Brewery, 117
-, pks., see Smethwick, Black Patch Pk., Harry Mitchell Pk., Lewisham Pk., Lightwoods Pk., Smethwick Hall Pk., Victoria Pk., Warley Pk., and West Smethwick
-, parl. hist., 123
-, Pedigree Works, 118
-, Piddocks (Cranford) farm, 102-3
-, Pig Mill farm, 109
-, place-name, 87
-, playing-fields, 96, 136
-, police, 119, 122
-, Pool (formerly Berwoods Hill) Farm, 89
-, poor relief, 119
-, pop., 87-8
-, postal services, 122-3
-, pound, 119
-, Prot. nonconf., 33, 122, 129-34, 139
-, public buildings, 97, 119-20
-, public health, 120-2
-, public services, 120-3
-, public transport, 122 and see Smethwick, communications, rlys.
-, quarter sessions, 119
-, Queens Head farm, 96
-, Rabone Hall, see Smethwick, Smethwick Hall
-, rlys., see Smethwick, communications
-, reeve, 118
-, rds., see Smethwick, communications
-, Rom. Cath., 88, 129, 138-40
-, Ruck of Stones farm, 99, 103, 106, 111, 124
-, Ruskin Pottery (formerly Birmingham Tile and Pottery Works), 118
-, St. George's Works, 105, 111, 113
-, Sandwell Park Colliery, 115
-, Sandwell Works, 112, 113
-, Sch. Board, 136
-, Shireland Hall, 103-4
-, Shireland Hall Farm, 104
-, Sikhs, 88, 129, 134
-, Slowe Moor, 94
-, slum clearance, see Smethwick, housing
-, Smethwick Common, 107
-, Smethwick Cross, 89
-, Smethwick Foundry, 111 n, 113
-, Smethwick Grove, 104-5, 110, 128
-, Smethwick (later Rabone) Hall, 105
-, Smethwick Hall Pk., 106
-, Smethwick Ho. (later Smethwick Hall), 105-6
-, Smethwick Institute, 140-1
-, social life, 92-3, 134-6
-, Soho, 94, 98, 112, 122
-, Soho Foundry, 102, 110, 113-14
-, sport, 92-3, 135-6
-, Spout Ho., 89
-, streets:
-, Anderson Rd., see Warley Rd.
-, Arthur St., see Great Arthur St.
-, Auckland Rd., 106
-, Ballot St., 95
-, Bampton Rd., 95
-, Bearwood Rd. (formerly Lane), 97, 132
-, Bolham Rd., 95
-, Boulton Rd., 94
-, Bowling Alley Lane, 92
-, Brasshouse Lane, 92
-, Bridge St., 91, 93
-, Broomfield, 91
-, Cambridge Rd., 93
-, Capethorn Rd., 89
-, Cheshire Rd., 89
-, Church St., see Marriott St.
-, Church St. West, see Mallin St.
-, Claremont Rd., 89 n
-, Corbett St., 95
-, Cranford St., 94
-, Cross St., 91
-, Dartmouth Rd., 93
-, Downing St., 92
-, Edgbaston Rd., 89 n
-, Ethel St., 96
-, Exeter Rd., 95
-, Florence Rd., 95
-, George St., 92
-, Grantham Rd., 96 n
-, Great Arthur St. (formerly Arthur St.), 93
-, Halford's Lane, 92
-, High (Hyde) Park Rd., 95
-, High St., 88
-, Hume St., 95
-, James St., 91
-, Kimberley Rd., 93
-, Lewisham Rd., see Ruck of Stones Lane
-, London St., 94
-, Lower Cross St., 94
-, Mafeking Rd., 93
-, Mallin St. (formerly Church St. West), 92
-, Manor Rd., 89
-, Marriott (formerly Church) St., 92
-, Messenger Rd. (formerly High Park Rd.), 95
-, Middlemore Rd., 93
-, Milton St., see Rutland Rd.
-, Montague Rd., 95-6
-, Mornington Rd., 93
-, New Inn Lane, see Rabone Lane
-, New St., 91
-, Nine Leasowes (formerly Pleasant St.), 92
-, North Western Rd., 92
-, Oldbury Rd., 91-2
-, Oxford Rd., 93
-, Park Rd., see West Park Rd.
-, Perry (formerly St. George) St., 93
-, Piddock Rd., 91
-, Pleasant St., see Nine Leasowes
-, Pool Rd., 95
-, Pope St., 93
-, Poplar Rd., 96
-, Poplar St., 94
-, Price St., 95
-, Queen St., 91
-, Rabone (formerly New Inn) Lane, 93, 105
-, Raglan Rd., 94-5
-, Rawlings Rd., 96, 100
-, Regent St., 91
-, Reginald Rd., 96
-, Reynolds St., 94
-, Roebuck Lane, 10
-, Rolfe St., 91
-, Ruck of Stones Lane (later Lewisham Rd.), 93
-, Rutland Rd. (formerly Milton St.), 96
-, St. George St., see Perry St.
-, St. Paul's Rd., 92
-, Scotch Row, 92, 120
-, Shireland Lane, see Waterloo Rd.
-, Shireland Rd., 95
-, Slough (Sloe, Slowe) Lane, see Wellington St.
-, Soho St., 95
-, South St. (later Rd.), 91, 141
-, Spon Lane, 91-2
-, Stony Lane, 91
-, Street House Lane, 92
-, Suffrage St., 95
-, Summit Crescent, 92
-, Sycamore Rd., 96 n
-, Sydenham Rd., 93
-, Thimblemill Rd., 109
-, Three Shires Oak Rd., 96
-, Tiverton Rd., 95
-, Union St., 91
-, Upper Grove St., 94
-, Victoria Park Rd., 95
-, Vittoria St., 94
-, Warley (later Anderson) Rd., 96
-, Waterloo Rd. (formerly Shireland Lane), 89
-, Wellington Rd., 89
-, Wellington St. (formerly Slough Lane), 93-4, 120-1
-, West Park Rd. (formerly Park Rd.), 92
-, Wills St., 94
-, Windmill Lane, 94-5, 120
-, Sugar Well, 93
-, Sunday schs., see Smethwick, educ.
-, Surrey Works, 111
-, Temperance Hall, 130, 132
-, theatres, 134-5
-, Three Shires Oak, 96
-, town halls, see Smethwick, Council Ho. and public buildings
-, trams, see Smethwick, public transport
-, the Uplands (villa), 91
-, Victoria Iron Foundry, 112
-, Victoria Pk., 89
-, Victoria Works, 113
-, Votingham, 95 n
-, wake, 134
-, Warley Abbey, see Smethwick, Warley Woods
-, Warley Pk., 96
-, Warley Woods, 119
-, ch., 128-9
-, growth, 96, 121
-, Prot. nonconf., 130, 132
-, sch., 139
-, Warley Abbey, 96
-, water-supply, 121
-, West Smethwick:
-, baths, 121
-, cemetery, 122
-, ch., 125-6
-, Crown Inn, 117
-, growth, 91-2
-, ind., 115-18
-, Pk., 92, 107
-, Prot. nonconf., 131-3
-, sch., 140
-, Swan Inn, 92
-, White Gates, 97
-, woodland, 108
-, Windmill Brewery, 117-18
-, woodland, 107-8
-, the Woodlands, 106

Smethwick, West, see Smethwick, West Smethwick

Smethwick Brass Co., 109

Smethwick Drop Forgings Ltd., 113-14, 131

Smethwick Hall Estate Co. Ltd., 106

Smethwick Tube Co., 114

Smith:
-, A., 244
-, A. S., & Sons Ltd., 197
-, Bernard (Father), organ-builder, 233
-, Sir Edwin Thos., 275
-, F., 244
-, F. W., 176
-, Jacob, 256
-, Jas., 17, 32
-, John, Ltd., 65
-, Jos., bell-founder (fl. 1731), 233
-, Jos. (d. probably c. 1858), 174
-, Jos. Crowther, 174
-, Sam., 120
-, W., 264
-, W. J., & Son Ltd., 38
-, W. M., 244
-, Wm. (d. 1687), 109
-, Wm., architect (d. 1724), 19
-, Wm. (fl. 1729), 109
-, Wm. Wynne, 99
-, — (fl. 1868), 100
-, fam., 195

Smith Bros. (Walsall) Ltd., 186

Smyth:
-, Geo., 173
-, Ric., and his w., 16 n

Sneyd Brook, 143, 167, 181

soap-making, 42, 94, 116-17

Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 53

soft-drink manufacture, 43, 118

Soho, Handsworth & Perry Barr Junction Railway, 98

Solihull (Warws.), see Shirley

Solly, Wm., vicar of St. Philip's, West Bromwich, 59 n

Somerfield, Thos., & Sons Ltd., 199

Somerset, duke of, see Beaufort

Somery:
-, Joan, m. Thos. de Botetourt, 14
-, John, Lord Somery, 14, 169

South African War, 206

South Staffordshire and Birmingham District Steam Tramways Co. Ltd., 49, 225

South Staffordshire coalfield, 37, 39- 41, 115, 188

South Staffordshire Electric Lighting Co. Ltd., 49

South Staffordshire Joint Smallpox Hospital Board, 121

South Staffordshire Newspaper and Printing Co. Ltd., 73

South Staffordshire Plateau, 1, 87, 143

South Staffordshire Railway, 14, 168-9

South Staffordshire Water Works Co., 47-8, 121, 222

Spencer:
-, Geo., 61
-, Geo. John, Earl Spencer, 61
-, J. E., 37
-, John (fl. mid 19th cent.), 36-7
-, John (fl. later 19th cent.), 37
-, John (d. c. 1911), 85
-, Thos., 36

Spiritualists, 70, 134, 248-9

Spoonhill (in Much Wenlock, Salop.), 216

Sporior, see Spurrier

sports and pastimes, see bear-baiting bull-baiting cock-fighting cricket dog-fighting football 'heaving' horse-racing mystery plays

Spring Dart Co. Ltd., 65

springs, manufacture of, 36-7, 115

spur-making, see horse furniture

Spurrier (Sporior):
-, John, 194
-, Wm. (d. 1848), 94, 101
-, Wm. (fl. 1825-43, ? another), 172

Stafford:
-, Edw., duke of Buckingham, 178
-, Sir Hen., 170
-, Hen., Lord Stafford, 178
-, Humph., earl of Stafford (later duke of Buckingham), 178
-, Marg., see Beaufort
-, Thos. de, earl of Stafford, 178
-, fam., 232

Stafford, earls of, 178 and see Stafford (fam.)

Stafford, 145, 152, 176, 188, 238-9
-, archdeacon of, 53
-, gaol, 219
-, infirmary, 212, 222

Staffordshire:
-, county council, 136, 265, 283
-, sheriff of, 18

Staffordshire Galvanizing & Corrugated Iron Co., 200

Stanley:
-, Cecily, see Frebody
-, Fra., 16
-, G. H., 176
-, Geo., 16
-, Sir Humph., 209, 213
-, John, 16
-, Marg., see Beaufort
-, Sir Thos., later earl of Derby, 170, 229
-, Wal., 16, 32, 51-2
-, Wm., 16, 32
-, Winifred, w. of Fra., 16
-, fam., 54

Stanley Bros (Walsall), 197

Stanton, A. H., organ-builder, 207

Stanton & Son, organ-builders, 207

Staple, John, chantry priest, 254

Starkey:
-, John, 176
-, Wm., 176

Staveley Coal & Iron Co. Ltd., 193

Staveley Industries Ltd., 193

Stavensby, Alex, bp. of Coventry and Lichfield, 51

steel manufacture, 39, 93, 101, 194

Stephenson:
-, John, & Co., 116 n
-, Rob., rly. engineer, 110

Sterry (Sterrer):
-, Ric., 8
-, Wm., 8 n

Stewarts & Lloyds, 201

Stillingfleet, Edw., minister of West Bromwich, 51-2, 63

stirrups, see horse furniture

Stockton-on-Tees (co. Dur.), 46

Stoke Edith (Herefs.), 191

Stoke-on-Trent, see Tunstall

Stoke-upon-Trent, see Seabridge

Stokes:
-, John, 280
-, John, Ltd., 194 n
-, Wm., Baptist minister, 62

Stone:
-, Anne, 180
-, Eliz., 180
-, Hen. (d. 1642), 179-80, 186, 229, 232, 271-2
-, Hen. (d. 1689), 145-6, 179-80, 215, 241, 269, 271, 273
-, Hen., grds. of last, 180
-, John (fl. 1539), 190
-, John (fl. later 1570s), 192
-, John (fl. 1590), 179
-, John, s. of Hen. (d. 1689), 180
-, Mary, 180
-, Ric. (d. probably c. 1550), 225
-, Ric. (of Walsall, d. c. 1639), 272
-, Ric. (of Caldmore), 272
-, Sam., 180
-, Sarah, 180
-, Wm., 184
-, fam., 164

Stone Cross, see Bromwich, West

Stonnall (in Shenstone), 182, 228

Stooke:
-, John, 233
-, Ric., 233

Stour Valley Coal and Iron Co., 39

Stourbridge (in Old Swinford, Worcs.), 32, 191

Stourbridge Extension Railway, 14, 98, 106, 115

Stratford-upon-Avon (Warws.), 235

Street, A. E., architect, 128

Streetly (in Shenstone), 255

Stretton on Fosse (Warws.), 173

Strongitharm:
-, Edw., 192
-, Geo., 191
-, John, 191
-, Jos. Bealey, 176

Stubbs:
-, Ann, 99
-, G. B., town clerk of Walsall, 145
-, Jos., town clerk of Walsall, 188
-, Mary, 99
-, Matt., town clerk of Walsall, 180, 216
-, fam., 99

Studd, Major-General E. M., 89

Stylband, John, curate of West Bromwich, 51

Suffolk, marquess of, see Pole

Sulman, John, architect, 69

Sunderland (co. Dur.), 114

Surrey, earl of, see Howard

Surrey, see Brixton Lambeth

Sutton:
-, Hannah, 50
-, Sir John, 184
-, Dr. Wm., 94
-, fam., 50
-, and see Dudley

Sutton Chase (in Staffs. and Warws.), 29

Sutton Coldfield (Warws.), 26, 105, 175, 189-90, 250, 275
-, Common, 165
-, Home of Rest for Women and Girls, 274
-, New Hall, 101
-, rector, see Hillary
-, rds., 12, 165
-, stone, 231
-, Sutton-in-Coldfield man., 170

Swan Village, see Bromwich, West

Swedenborgians (New Church), 134

Swetcocke, Thos., and his w. Sybil, 26

Swinford, Old (Worcs.):
-, Hospital Sch., 74, 136
-, Stourbridge, q.v.

Swynnerton, rector of, see Ridware

Sydenham (in Lewisham, Kent), 111

T. I., see Tube Investments Ltd.

Taillour, Wm., abbot of Halesowen, 176 and see Taylor

Talbot:
-, Fred., 138
-, John, earl of Shrewsbury, 240
-, W. J. (later Sir Wm.), 202

Talbot-Stead Tube Co. Ltd., 202

Talgarth (Brec.), Trevecca Coll., 68

Tame, river, 1, 12-13, 28, 30-4, 143, 192

Tame and Rea Drainage Board, 121

Tame Valley Canal, 14, 32, 168

Tamworth, 204 and see Fazeley

Tangye:
-, H. L., 106
-, Sir Ric., 95, 106

Tangyes Ltd. (formerly Tangye Bros. & Price and Tangye Bros.), 105, 112, 122, 133

tanning, see leather trades

Tanworth (Warws.), Umberslade Hall, 20

Tat Bank, see Oldbury

Tatenhill, see Wychnor

Taylor:
-, Edw. Ric., 118
-, John (fl. 1399), 147 n
-, John (fl. 18th cent.), 256
-, Wm., 30
-, Wm. Howson, 118
-, —, Rom. Cath. priest (fl. 1773), 240
-, and see Taillour

Taylor & Co., bell-founders, 233

teeth, false, see false teeth

Telephone Newspaper Co. Ltd., 135

Telford, Thos., 11, 13, 97

Temperance Society, 130

Territorial Army, 136

Tettenhall, 19, 60 and see Pendeford the Wergs

Thaxted (Essex), Horham Hall, 18

Theobald, abp. of Canterbury, 50

Theosophical Society, 70

Thimblemill Brook, 87, 97-8, 108-9

Thomas:
-, G. & R., Ltd., 193
-, Geo., 193
-, R., 192
-, Ric., 193

Thomason, Yeoville, architect, 119, 135

Thompson:
-, G., & Co., 39
-, John, 33
-, John A., 106
-, Laur., 31
-, Rob., vicar of Holy Trinity, West Bromwich, 56
-, Sam., 91
-, fam., 106

Thorley, Nicholl, 15-16

Three Shires Oak, see Smethwick

Tidenham (Glos.), Pen Moel, 103

tile-making, 22, 41, 192, 280

Tipton, 12, 42, 46, 172, 174, 228, 234, 255
-, canals, 13-14
-, chs., 57
-, Dudley Port, q.v.
-, educ., 81
-, Great Bridge, q.v.
-, ind., 116
-, Ocker Hill, q.v.
-, Prot. nonconf., 65 n, 66
-, public services, 49-50
-, Rom. Cath., 61
-, Sheepwash, q.v.
-, Toll End, q.v.

Titford branch canal, 98

Titford canal feeder, 98

Tixall, stone from, 55, 125

Toll End (in Tipton), 14

Tories, 226, 264 and n and see Conservative party

Townsend:
-, Chas., minister of All Saints', West Bromwich, 52
-, Eliza, 106
-, Hen., 207
-, Thos. (fl. 1834-5), 104
-, Thos. (fl. 1872), 106

Townsend & Co. Ltd., 207

Trafalgar, battle of, 4

Trent and Mersey Canal, 168

Trevecca Coll., see Talgarth

Triumphant Church of God, 70

Trustees for Maintenance of Ministers, see Ministers

Tube Investments Ltd., 114, 202

tube-making, 8, 111-12, 114, 158, 160, 193-4, 201-2

Tudor, Marg., see Beaufort

Tunstall (Stoke-on-Trent), 245

Turner:
-, John, 99, 100, 137 n
-, Wm., 100
-, Mrs. (fl. 1764-5), 99

Turton:
-, Eleanor, 24, 30, 84
-, J. W., 31 n
-, John (d. 1649), 25
-, John (d. 1673), 25
-, John (fl. 1685), 8
-, John (d. 1705), 25
-, John (d. 1768), 21, 25-6
-, Josiah, 24, 52 n, 67
-, Mary, m. Rob. Abney, 24, 30, 52 n
-, Phoebe, 24
-, Phoebe, see Freeth
-, Ric., 24
-, Thos., 25
-, Wm. (d. 1621), 30
-, Wm. (d. 1628), 24-5, 84
-, Wm. (d. 1656), 24
-, Wm. (d. 1663), 30
-, Wm. (d. 1681), 24
-, Wm. (d. 1682), 21, 25
-, Wm. (fl. 1693), 67
-, fam., 67

Tylney:
-, Eliz., m. 1 Sir Humph. Bourchier, 2 Thos. Howard, earl of Surrey and duke of Norfolk, 279
-, Fred. (d. by 1412), 173
-, Fred. (or Phil.), 279
-, Sir Fred., 279
-, Margery, w. of Fred., 173-4, 279

Umberslade Hall, see Tanworth

Underhill, Anne (née Baddeley), 99

Unett:
-, John Wilkes, 91, 94, 103, 106, 125-6
-, fam., 106

Union branch canal, 14

Union (Roway) branch canal, 13

Unionists, 120, 217, 252

Unitarians, 62, 67, 70, 248-9, 251, 266

United Reformed Church, see Congregationalists Presbyterians

United Spring Co. Ltd., 115

United States of America, see America

Upper Arley, see Arley, Upper

Upper Gornal, see Gornal, Upper

Upper Tame Main Drainage Authority, 47, 176, 221, 281

Urban Phospho-Manure Co. Ltd., 207

Valentine & Throsby, 251

Veall, J. R., architect, 238

Verichrome Plating Co., 198

Verney, Phil., and his w. Florence, 279

Vernon:
-, Sir Geo., 15
-, Sir Hen. (d. 1515), 15, 228
-, Hen. (fl. 1776), 179
-, Hen. (fl. c. 1800, ? another), 268
-, Sir John, 15
-, Jos., 123, 130
-, Marg., w. of Sir Wm., 15
-, Sir Wm., 15
-, fam., 123, 179

Victoria, Queen, jubilees of:
-, 1887, 163, 265
-, 1897, 89, 125

Vincent, Master, rector of Walsall, 226 n

Virgins End, see Bromwich, West

Wakering:
-, Dionysius, 179
-, Sir Gilb., 179, 234
-, John, 179
-, Mary, m. Fra. St. John, 179

Wales:
-, Princes of, see Edward V George IV
-, Princess of, see Alexandra

Walhouse:
-, Edw. John, see Littleton
-, John, 151, 177, 191, 267
-, Moreton, 177

Walker:
-, Alex., 103
-, Eliz., see Pearte
-, Eliz., m. John Persehouse (d. 1605), 177
-, Ric., 177
-, Thos., 248
-, Wm., 177

Walkers Sons & Co., 103

Wallace, Beatrice, 233

Wallexhall, see Oldbury

Walsall, 13, 143-284, 160
-, as address, 31, 56
-, agric., 170, 180-4
-, airfield, see Walsall, communications
-, Alma Tube Works, 201
-, alms-hos., 241, 267-8, 271
-, Alpha Tube Works, 201
-, Arboretum, 152, 160, 191, 219, 222
-, art galleries, 252
-, assembly-rooms, 218, 251
-, barracks, 268
-, baths, 222
-, Bayard's Box, 214
-, Bayard's Colts, 145, 188, 220
-, beadles, 212
-, Bentley Moor, 160, 189
-, Bentleyland, 178
-, Bescot, 1, 12, 143, 185
-, agric., 180
-, Bescot Farm, 158
-, bridge, 168
-, growth, 157-9
-, Hall, 31, 159, 172-3, 176, 191, 240
-, ind., 158, 192
-, man., 171-3
-, rly., 168
-, rds., 166-7
-, sewage works, 221 n
-, Birchills, 225
-, agric., 180-2
-, Brickmakers' Arms inn, 250
-, canal, 168
-, ch., 237-8, 259
-, growth, 159-60
-, Hall, 145, 159
-, ind., 189, 192-6, 198-200, 204, 206
-, mill, 186
-, Prot. nonconf., 244, 249
-, rly., 169
-, rds., 159, 166
-, schs. 259-60
-, woodland, 184
-, Birchills Limeworks, 192
-, Bloxwich, q.v.
-, boro. institutions, 186-8, 212-20, 224
-, mayors, 145, 149, 172, 179, 188, 191, 211-17, 219, 226, 229, 267-8, 271-2, 275 deputy, 215
-, recorders, 215-17, 220
-, town clerks, 188, 209, 215-17, 220 and see Galliardello Holmes Stubbs Wilkinson
-, boro. township, 179, 225, 253
-, chars. for poor, 267-73
-, growth, 146-9
-, ind., 194-9, 202-3
-, local govt., 209-12
-, police, 224
-, pop., 145, 183
-, tithes, 176
-, Bradford Place, 149
-, Bradford Tube Works, 201
-, the Bridge (formerly Bridge Sq.), 149, 224
-, bridges, see Walsall, communications
-, Broad Water, 146 n
-, Brockhurst, 190, 221
-, Brookhouse farm, 155
-, buses, see Walsall, public transport
-, the Butts, 151
-, ch., 238-9
-, educ., 261, 264
-, ind., 191, 208
-, local govt., 217
-, toll-gate, 165
-, Butts Limeworks, 191
-, Butts Mill, 208
-, cage, 219
-, Caldmore, 145-6, 179, 212, 269, 272
-, chars. for poor, 270, 274
-, ch., 238-9, 243
-, Dog and Partridge inn, 250
-, Doveridge, 156, 195, 198
-, fishery, 184
-, fulling-mill, 185
-, Green, 155
-, growth, 155-6
-, ind., 189-90, 195-9, 202-3
-, Little London, 155-6, 199
-, Prot. nonconf., 241-3, 246-7
-, rds., 166
-, schs., 238, 260
-, Shur Hall, 155
-, White Hart inn, 177, 178
-, Calewenhull, 184 n
-, canals, see Walsall, communications
-, Cannock Farm, 155
-, cemeteries, 149 n, 223
-, chars. for poor, 215-16, 266-75 apprenticing, 269, 272-3
-, the Chuckery, 153, 253, 261
-, church-ales, 218, 229
-, Church Hill, 147, 190-1, 194, 221 and see Walsall, streets
-, chs., 60, 223, 226-39, 241, 243, 258-9, 274
-, St. Matthew's (formerly All Saints'), 153 n, 190, 223, 224, 226-33, 231, 256, 270 chantries, 26, 179, 190, 227-9, 233, 254, 268 lights, 229 obits, 228-9 officials, 211-12 par., 234, 236-9, 274-5, 281 vicars, see Walsall, chs., clergy
-, clergy, 160, 228 and see Laing St. Matthew's, 217, 234, 237, 239, 258-60, 266-7, 269-71, 273-5, 281, 283 and see Allen Byrdall Dobson Fisk Hodgson Vincent Wilson
-, churchwardens, 210-11, 217, 235, 270-1, 273
-, cinemas, 250-1
-, Coll. of Art (formerly Municipal Sch. of Art), 265-6
-, collieries:
-, Birchills, 192-3
-, Green Lanes, 189, 193
-, James Bridge, 158, 189
-, Waterloo Colliery and Brickworks, 158
-, Collins Farm, see Walsall, Maw Green
-, commission of peace, 215
-, communications:
-, airfield, 169
-, bridges, 149, 151, 158, 167-8, 225
-, canals, 158, 165, 168, 186, 189, 191, 193, 201, 207, 240
-, rlys., 167-9
-, rds., 151-5, 157, 165-8, 212, 225
-, the Coningre, 178
-, constables, 210, 212-13, 270
-, Cormorant ironworks, 194
-, Council Ho., 97, 151, 218
-, county ct., 97, 217, 251
-, crown ct., 217
-, cucking-stool, 210, 219
-, Cyclops Ironworks, 193, 201
-, Cyclops Tube Works, 201-2
-, Daffodil Farm, see Walsall, Wood End
-, Daisy Bank farm, see Walsall, Wood End
-, Defiance Works, 206
-, the Delves, q.v.
-, educ., 154, 236-7, 241, 251, 254- 66, 269
-, grammar sch., 145, 149, 236, 254-6, 266 n estates, 179, 234, 279 governors, 216-17, 259, 283 masters, 227, 236
-, Sunday schs., 241-9, 254, 257, 259-60
-, electricity, 225
-, fairs, 187-8, 213, 224, 249-50
-, felons, association for prosecution of, 224
-, fields, common, 180-3, 186
-, fire services, 224
-, fisheries, 171, 184
-, Five Lane End (Sergeant's Coppice) farm, 154
-, Five Ways (formerly Five Lanes End), 154
-, Folly Ho. (later Rock's Cottage), 155
-, foreign, 179, 213-14, 253
-, chars. for poor, 267, 269-71, 273-4
-, ind., 189, 194-5
-, local govt., 209-12, 215-17, 219, 235, 281 bailiff, 171, 209-10
-, man., 170
-, pop., 145, 183
-, public services, 220, 224-5
-, Rom. Cath., 240
-, tithes, 177
-, Forest Works, 206
-, free warren, 184
-, Fullbrook, 155
-, bridge, 168
-, ch., 60, 239
-, rds., 166
-, sch., 255
-, gaol, 219
-, gas, 224-5
-, geology, 143, 189-90, 192
-, Gillity Greaves, see Walsall, Wood End
-, glebe, 156, 227
-, Glebeland Works, 197
-, Globe Ironworks, 194
-, Goodall Works, 205
-, Gorway Farm, 154
-, Gorway Ho., 154-5
-, Green Lanes Furnaces, 193, 222, 225
-, growth of town, 146-65
-, guildhall, 177, 188, 209, 218-20, 250-1
-, guilds, 26, 204, 214-15, 218, 228-9, 266
-, Hatherton Hill Ho. (later St. Patrick's Convent), 152
-, Hatherton Lake, 152
-, Hatherton Limeworks, 192
-, Hay Head, 168, 184, 190-1
-, farm, 174-5, 184
-, man., 174-5
-, High Cross, 187, 214, 219
-, high wardens, 215
-, Highgate Brewery, 206
-, Highgate Ho., 154
-, highway surveyors, 212
-, hosps., 222-3
-, ho. of correction, 219
-, housing, 147, 149, 151-61, 163-5, 175-6, 220-1
-, slum clearance, 149, 156, 161, 165, 221
-, Hurst's House, see Walsall, Wood End, Daffodil Farm
-, immigrants, 145, 156-7, 161, 241, 243, 249
-, improvement commrs., 151, 154, 161, 188, 217, 220-2, 224
-, inc., 182, 241
-, ind., 151, 153, 155-60, 165, 171, 183-5, 188-208, 220, 222, 225, 268
-, inns (town centre):
-, Angel, 167
-, Black Boy, 241-2
-, Castle, 167, 243-4, 251
-, Dragon (formerly Green Dragon), 167, 218, 240, 242, 244 n, 250-1
-, George, 167-8, 209, 251
-, Green Man, 242
-, 'my lord's inn', 147
-, New Inn, 167, 243, 250
-, Railway Commercial, 149
-, Royal Oak, 242
-, Three Cups, 167
-, Three Swans, 167
-, Wheatsheaf, 180, 250
-, James Bridge, 158, 159 n
-, bridge, 168, 184
-, ind., 189, 192, 194
-, rly., 169
-, rds., 166
-, Ladypool, 184
-, lammas lands, 182
-, Laundhill, 191
-, libraries, 251-2, 264
-, Lime Pit Bank, 191, 198, 230, 250
-, literary institutes, 253
-, Little London, see Walsall, Caldmore
-, local govt., 208-20, 283
-, magazines, 253
-, man., 169-71, 173-4, 178 n, 185, 279, 281
-, ct. and govt., 209-10, 213-14, 217-18, 267
-, man.-ho., 170-1, 184
-, Manor Works, 208
-, mkts., 187-8, 209-10, 213, 224, 256
-, Maw Green, 155, 199, 253
-, Collins Farm, 155
-, Maw Green Farm, 155
-, mayors, see Walsall, boro. institutions
-, meadows, common, 181-2, 185, 250
-, mechanics' institutes, 264
-, medical officer of health, 220-1
-, Memorial Gardens, 149
-, mills, 184-7, 192-3, 240
-, Moat Hill, 222
-, the Mount, 240
-, Municipal Sch. of Art, see Walsall, Coll. of Art
-, museums, 252, 264
-, musical societies, 251
-, New Birchills furnaces, 193
-, New Side ironworks, 194
-, newspapers, 249, 252-3
-, non-Christian religions, 249
-, North Walsall Brickworks, 161
-, Old Birchills furnaces, 193
-, Old Sq., 149
-, overseers of poor, 211-12, 217, 267, 269
-, the Paddock, 161
-, Palfrey, 272
-, ch., 239
-, field, common, 181
-, Green, 157, 190, 192
-, growth, 156-7
-, immigrants, 145
-, ind., 206
-, Palfrey Farm, 157
-, pk., 157
-, Prot. nonconf., 246
-, Redhouse Farm, 157
-, schs., 262
-, Stocking Green, 182
-, par. govt., 210-12
-, pk. (manorial), 158, 171, 178, 184-5, 189-90, 210, 214
-, pks. (public), see Walsall, Arboretum, Palfrey, the Pleck, and Reedswood
-, Park Hall, 154-5
-, Park Ho., 158
-, Park Lodge est., 154
-, the Parks, 192
-, Parks Farm, 158
-, parl. hist., 145, 224-6, 264-5
-, Peg's Piece, 156
-, pillory, 210, 219
-, place-name, 144
-, playing-fields, 152, 159
-, the Pleck, 157-9
-, ch., 237, 239 n
-, common, 182
-, gas-works, 224
-, ind., 190, 193-4, 197, 199-202, 204-5
-, pk., 159, 172
-, Prot. nonconf., 245, 247
-, rly., 14, 169
-, rds., 166
-, schs., 257-8, 260-2
-, police, 219, 223-4
-, poor-law union, 45, 212, 222-3
-, poor relief, 212, 215
-, pop., 145, 147, 149, 153-5, 157-60, 189
-, Portland Street Limeworks, 192
-, post offices, 225
-, Pouk Hill, 160
-, pound, 210, 219
-, Prospect Ho., 156
-, Prot. nonconf., 67, 145, 211, 215- 16, 223, 241-9, 254, 257, 259- 60, 264, 266, 282-3
-, public health, 220-3
-, public services, 220-5
-, public transport, 225 and see Walsall, communications, rlys.
-, quarter sessions, 215
-, race-courses, 250, 255
-, rlys., see Walsall, communications
-, rates, 211, 216-17, 224, 271
-, rectory, 176-7, 227
-, Redhouse Farm, see Walsall, Palfrey
-, Reedswood Pk., 160, 184, 189, 222, 254
-, Reliance Works, 204
-, Reynold's Hall, 151, 177, 191, 244
-, Reynold's Hall Farm, 151-2, 177
-, rds., see Walsall, communications
-, Rock's Cottage, see Walsall, Folly Ho.
-, Rom. Cath., 223, 227, 237-41, 241, 258-60, 266, 282
-, Ryecroft, 189
-, cemetery, 223
-, ch., 238
-, growth, 161
-, ind., 161, 203
-, local govt., 217
-, Prot. nonconf., 244, 247, 249
-, rly., 168
-, Ryecroft farm, 161
-, St. Matthew's Close, 149
-, St. Patrick's Convent, see Walsall, Hatherton Hill Ho.
-, Sargent's Hill, 154, 190
-, schs., see Walsall, educ.
-, scold's bridle, 219
-, Selborne Works, 208
-, Sergeant's Coppice farm, see Walsall, Five Lane End farm
-, serjeants, 210, 213, 215-16, 219
-, sewage farms, 221
-, Shaw's Leasowes, 168, 191, 236, 259
-, Shur Hall, see Walsall, Caldmore
-, slum clearance, see Walsall, housing
-, social life, 249-54
-, Speciality Works, 205
-, sport, 154, 250, 253
-, Spring Hill, 240
-, Spring Hill Ho., 154
-, Stocking Green, see Walsall, Palfrey
-, stocks, 219
-, streets:
-, Ablewell St., 147, 221
-, Albert (formerly Brook) St., 151
-, Alexandra Rd., 157
-, Alexandra St., 157
-, Algernon St., 161
-, Alumwell Rd., 159, 222
-, Arboretum Rd. (formerly Perse- house St.), 152
-, Arundel St., 156
-, Augustus St., 158
-, Bath Rd., 156
-, Bath St. (formerly Prospect Row), 155-6
-, Beacon St., 153
-, Belvidere Rd., 154
-, Bentley Lane, 159
-, Bernard St., 153
-, Bescot Crescent, 157
-, Bescot Rd., 159
-, Bescot St., 156 n
-, Birchills St., 159
-, Birmingham Rd., 154
-, Birmingham St., 147
-, Bloxwich Lane, see Stafford St.
-, Blue Lane, 160
-, Borneo St., 151 n
-, Bott Lane, 153
-, Box St., 153
-, Brace St., 156 n
-, Bradford St., 147, 161
-, Bridge St., 147
-, Bridgeman Place (later Terrace), 158
-, Bridgeman St., 158
-, Brineton St., 158
-, Broadway (formerly the Ring Rd.), 166-7
-, Broadway North, 152
-, Broadway West, 157
-, Brockhurst St., 158
-, Brook St. (Pleck), 158
-, Brook St., see Albert St.
-, Brygens Lane, 153
-, Buchanan Rd., 152
-, Bullock's Row (Rd.), 147
-, Burleigh St., 153
-, Burrowes St., 159
-, Butts Rd., 143 n
-, Calder Ave., 152
-, Caldmore Rd., 156
-, Caledon (formerly Regent) St., 158
-, Cambridge St., 156
-, Camden St., 156 n
-, Carless (formerly Oxford) St., 156
-, Castle Lane, see George St.
-, Cecil St., 151
-, Chapel St., see St. Quentin St.
-, Charles St., 158
-, Charlotte St., 152
-, Checketts St., 159
-, Church Hill, 149
-, Church St., 147
-, Cobden St., 157
-, Corporation St. West, 158
-, Countess St., 157
-, the Crescent, 153
-, Cross St., 149, 156
-, Dale St., 157
-, Dalkeith St., 160
-, Dark Lane, 153
-, Darwall St., 151
-, Deadman's Lane, see Hospital St.
-, Denmark Rd., 152
-, the Ditch, 147
-, Dovegrove St., see Ward St.
-, Earl St. (Palfrey), 157
-, Earl St. (Pleck), see Queen St.
-, Edward St., 160
-, Eldon St., 153
-, Emery St., 154
-, Essex St., 161 n
-, Farringdon St., 159-60
-, Fieldgate, 155-6
-, Florence St., 153
-, Foden Rd., 152, 166
-, Ford St., 159 n
-, Forrester St., 159
-, Forster St., Lower, 151 Upper, 151
-, Francis St., 160
-, Frederick St., 158
-, Freer St., 149
-, George St. (formerly Castle Lane, New Row, and St. George St.), 147
-, George St. (Pleck), see Long St.
-, Gladstone St., 161
-, Glebe St., 156
-, Goodall St., 149
-, Gorton's Yard, 147
-, Gorway Rd., 154
-, Green Lane, 159
-, Hall End, see Peal St.
-, Hall (Haw) Lane, 147
-, Hampton Lane, see Wolverhampton St.
-, Hatherton Lake Villas, see Victoria Terrace
-, Hatherton (formerly Littleton) Place, 151
-, Hatherton Rd., 151
-, Hatherton St., 151
-, Haw Lane, see Hall Lane
-, Henry St., 158
-, High St., 146, 224
-, Hill St., 147
-, Hillary St., 159 n
-, Hogfield Lane, see Skip Lane
-, Hole End, see Peal St.
-, Hollyhedge Lane, 159
-, Holtshill (formerly Holt) Lane, 151-2
-, Hope St., 156
-, Horseshoes Lane, see Wellington St.
-, Hospital St. (formerly Dead- man's Lane), 159, 223
-, Ida Rd., 159
-, Intown Row, 151
-, James St., see Leckie Rd.
-, Jessel Rd., 160
-, Jesson Rd., 154
-, King St., 154
-, King St. (Palfrey), 157
-, Kinnerley St., 153
-, Leckie Rd. (formerly James St.), 249
-, Leicester St., 151
-, Lewis St., 160
-, Lichfield St., 151, 160
-, Lime St., 153
-, Lincoln Rd., 153
-, Little Caldmore, 155
-, Little Hill, 149
-, Little London, 156
-, Little Newport St., 147
-, Littleton Place, 152 and see Hatherton Place
-, Littleton Rd., see Littleton St. West
-, Littleton St. West (formerly Littleton Rd.), 151
-, Lodge Rd., see Sandymount Rd.
-, Lodge St., see Sandymount Rd.
-, Long Ann St., 161
-, Long (formerly George) St., 158
-, Longwood Lane, 154
-, Lonsdale Rd., 154
-, Lord St., 157
-, Lumley Rd., 153
-, Lysways St., 154
-, Margaret St., 161
-, Marlow St., 161
-, Marsh St., 161
-, Meadow St., 158
-, Mellish Rd., 152
-, Midland Rd., 158
-, Milton St., 157
-, Moat Rd., 158-9
-, Moncrieffe St., 153
-, Mount St., 156 n
-, Mountrath St., 149
-, Narrow Lane, 158
-, Navigation St., 158
-, Neale St., 160
-, New Row, see George St.
-, New St., 147
-, Newgate St., see Peal St.
-, Newhall St., 156
-, Newland St., 160
-, Newport St., 147
-, Northcote St., 161
-, Old Birchills, 159
-, Orlando St., 156
-, Oxford St. (Caldmore), see Carless St.
-, Oxford St. (Pleck), 158-9
-, Paddock Lane, 153
-, Pain's Yard, 147
-, Pargeter St., 160
-, Park Hall Rd., 154
-, Park Lane, see Pleck Rd.
-, Park St., 146-7
-, Peakhouse Lane, 154
-, Peal St. (Hall End, Hole End, Newgate St.), 147
-, Persehouse St., 152
-, Pleck Rd. (formerly Park Lane), 157
-, Pool St., 153
-, Primley Ave., 159
-, Prince St., 159
-, Prince's Ave., 153
-, Proffitt (formerly Sandwell) St., 161
-, Prospect Row, see Bath St.
-, Queen Mary (formerly Queen) St., 157
-, Queen (formerly Earl) St., 158
-, Raleigh St., 160
-, Regent St. (Birchills), 159
-, Regent St. (Pleck), see Caledon St.
-, Richmond St., 153
-, the Ring Rd., see Broadway
-, Rollingmill St., 158
-, Rowley St., 152
-, Rushall St., 147, 151 Lower, 149, 240 Upper, 149
-, Rutter St., 156 n
-, St. George St., see George St.
-, St. Mary's Row, 156
-, St. Michael (formerly Stratford) St., 156
-, St. Paul's St., 147
-, St. Quentin (formerly Chapel) St., 158, 245
-, Sandwell St. (formerly Windmill), 155-6
-, Sandwell St., see Proffitt St.
-, Sandymount Rd. (formerly Lodge St. and Lodge Rd.), 154, 206
-, Scarborough Rd., 159
-, Selborne St., 153
-, Shaw St., 161
-, Short St., 158
-, Skip (formerly Hogfield) Lane, 153-4
-, Slaney Rd., 159
-, South St., 156 n
-, Springhill Rd., 147
-, Stafford St. (formerly Bloxwich Lane), 160
-, Stank Lane, 157
-, Station St., 149
-, Stratford St., see St. Michael St.
-, Sun St., 157
-, Sutton Crescent, 153
-, Sutton Rd., 153-4, 165
-, Tantarra St., 153
-, Tasker St. (formerly Tasker's Lane), 158
-, Teddesley St., 151
-, Temple St., 149
-, Tennyson St., 157
-, Thorpe Rd., 156
-, Tong St., 153
-, Tower St., 151
-, Union St., 153
-, Vicarage St., 156
-, Vicarage Walk, 156
-, Victor St., 156 n
-, Victoria Terrace (formerly Hatherton Lake Villas), 152
-, Villiers St., 157
-, Walhouse Rd. (formerly Wal-house St. and Upper and Lower Walhouse St.), 152
-, Walsingham St., 153
-, Ward (formerly Dovegrove) St., 151
-, Warewell St., 153
-, Warwick St., 151
-, Wednesbury Rd., 156
-, Wellington St. (formerly Horse- shoes Lane), 158
-, West Bromwich Rd., 166
-, Westbourne Rd., 151
-, Weston Rd. (later St.), 155
-, Weston St. (Pleck), 158
-, Wharf St., 158
-, Whitehall Rd., 157
-, William St., 151
-, Windmill, see Sandwell St.
-, Windmill St., 156
-, Windsor St., 156
-, Wisemore, 160-1
-, Wolverhampton St. (formerly Hampton Lane), 160
-, Wood End Lane, 153
-, 'Stubcross', 190
-, Sultan Works, 207
-, Sunday schs., see Walsall, educ.
-, Technical Coll., 265
-, Teddesley Ho., 151
-, Temperance Hall, 242-3, 248, 251, 253
-, the Terrace, 154, 176, 227, 257
-, theatres, 177, 250-1
-, tithes, 176-7, 227
-, Town Brewery, 206
-, town chest, 214
-, town clerks, see Walsall, boro. institutions
-, town feoffees, 13, 214, 216, 223
-, town halls, see Walsall, Council Ho. and guildhall
-, Townend Bank, 190, 225, 267, 272
-, cinema (formerly theatre), 251
-, growth, 160-1, 183
-, hosp., 222
-, housing, 221
-, ind., 196
-, pound, 219
-, rds., 147, 166 n, 212
-, sch., 246, 259, 260
-, Townend Sq., 149
-, trams, see Walsall, public transport
-, tramways (industrial), 168, 189, 191
-, vestries, 211-12, 224
-, Vicarage Moor, 221-2
-, Vicarage Terrace, 156
-, Victoria Ironworks, 200
-, wake, 249, 256
-, Walsall Factory Est., 207
-, Walsall Tube Works, 201
-, the Wastes, 177-8
-, water-supply, 220-2
-, Waterloo Brickworks, see Walsall, collieries
-, whipping-stock, 219
-, White Horse Brewery, 206
-, Whitehall, 157
-, ind., 195, 199
-, sch., 263
-, White Hall, 157
-, Windmill (hamlet), 253
-, ind., 195, 198
-, sch., 260
-, Wisemore Works, 201
-, Wood End, 175, 180, 212
-, agric., 184
-, char. for poor, 270
-, Daffodil Farm (formerly Hurst's Ho. and Wood End Ho.), 175, 191
-, Daisy Bank farm, 183
-, Gillity Greaves, 175-6
-, growth, 153-4, 183
-, Hurst's Ho., see Walsall, Wood End, Daffodil Farm
-, ind., 192, 195
-, Red Ho. inn, 230
-, rds., 165
-, Wood End Farm, 179, 184, 191
-, Wood End Ho., see Walsa Wood End, Daffodil Farm
-, woodland, 184
-, workhos., 212
-, 'Yolebruge', 168

Walsall and Staffordshire Technical Coll., see Walsall Coll. of Technology

Walsall and West Bromwich District Schools, see Bromwich, West

Walsall Arboretum and Lake Co. Ltd., 152

Walsall Brook, 143, 144 n, 146, 149, 167, 180, 182, 185, 190, 220, 222

Walsall Civic Guild of Help, see Walsall Guild of Social Service

Walsall Coll. of Technology (formerly Walsall and Staffordshire Technical Coll.), 265

Walsall District Iron Co. Ltd., 194

Walsall Electrical Co. Ltd., 207-8

Walsall Football Club, 253

Walsall Freehold Land Society, 156-7

Walsall Guild of Social Service and Citizens' Advice Bureau (formerly Walsall Civic Guild of Help), 274

Walsall Health Society, 221

Walsall Hospital Management Committee, 223

Walsall Iron Co., 193, 222

Walsall Locks and Cart Gear Ltd., 160

Walsall North parl. constituency, 225-6

Walsall Packing Case Co., 208

Walsall Polish Manufacturing Co., 207

Walsall Political Union, 264

Walsall School Children's Holiday Camp Trust, 255

Walsall South parl. constituency, 225-6

Walsall Temperance Association, 251

Walsall Tuberculosis After Care Committee, 274

Walsall Varnish Manufacturing Co., 207

Walsall Victoria Nursing Institution, 275

Walsall Wesleyan Mutual Improvement Society, 264

Walsall Women's Unionist Association, 217

Walsall Wood, 275-84
-, agric., 279-80
-, canals, see Walsall Wood, communications
-, Catshill, 168, 278, 281
-, ch., 81, 281-3
-, cinema, 279
-, Clayhanger, 178, 278-80
-, ch., 282
-, Clayhanger Brickworks, 280-1
-, growth, 278
-, sch., 279
-, Coalheath, 277, 279-80
-, commons, 278-81
-, communications:
-, canals, 168, 278, 281
-, rlys., 278
-, rds., 277-8
-, Dairy farm, 280
-, educ., 283-4
-, Sunday schs., 282-3
-, Four Crosses inn, 282
-, gas, 281
-, geol., 277
-, Goblins Pit, 278-9
-, Grange farm, 280
-, High Heath, 277, 279-80
-, ch., 282
-, schs., 283
-, highway dist., 212
-, Horse and Jockey inn, 282
-, inc., 278-81
-, ind., 277-8, 280-2
-, Irondish, 277, 280
-, local govt., 281
-, Oak Park recreation centre, 279
-, parl. hist., 225
-, Paul's Coppice, 278-81
-, police, 281
-, poor relief, 281
-, pop., 277
-, post office, 281
-, pounds, 210, 281
-, Prot. nonconf., 282
-, public services, 281
-, public transport, 278, 281
-, rlys., see Walsall Wood, communications
-, rds., see Walsall Wood, communications
-, Rom. Cath., 282-3
-, schs., see Walsall Wood, educ.
-, sewage works, 281
-, Shaver's End, 277
-, Shelfield, 172, 225, 228, 268, 280
-, bridge, 278
-, char., 270
-, ch., 282
-, fields, common, 279
-, growth, 277
-, ind., 280-1
-, man., 279, 281 cts., 281
-, mills, 280-1
-, pound, 210, 281
-, Prot. nonconf., 282
-, Rom. Cath., 282
-, School Farm, 279
-, schs., 283-4
-, Shelfield Farm, 277
-, Shelfield House farm, 277, 280
-, Shelfield Lodge, 277, 282
-, wakes, 278
-, Shire Oak, 277-8, 280
-, Sunday schs., see Walsall Wood, educ.
-, Vigo, 278, 280
-, village, 277-8, 283
-, wakes, 278
-, woodland, 279

Walsall Wood Colliery Co., 280-1

Walters, Cornelius, 42

Walton:
-, Thos., 26
-, Warin de, 192

Ward:
-, Peter, 42
-, T. W., 193
-, W. & A., 42
-, Wm., 42
-, Alderman Wm., 151

Waring, Elijah, 174, 202

Warley county boro. (Worcs.), 9-11, 94, 96, 120, 122, 135
-, Coll. of Technology, 141

Warley Salop (in Halesowen in Salop. and Worcs.), 45

Warley Wigorn (in Halesowen in Salop. and Worcs.), 45

Warley Woods, see Smethwick

Warnock, J. M., architect, 246

Warrington (Lancs.), 14, 206

Warwick:
-, ctss. of, see Beauchamp
-, duke of, see Beauchamp
-, earls of, 178, 209 and see Beauchamp Dudley

Warwickshire, 51, 188, 273 and see Aston Bascote Bickenhill Birmingham Bromwich, Castle Chesterton Coleshill Coventry Edgbaston Itchington, Bishop's Maxstoke Merevale Middleton Milverton Moxhull Sheldon Shirley Shustoke Stratford-upon-Avon Stretton on Fosse Sutton Chase Sutton Coldfield Tanworth 'Wincott' Wolvershill

Warwickshire Monthly Meeting (Quaker), 244

Wath upon Dearn (Yorks. W. R.), Milton and Elsecar Ironworks, 106

Watt:
-, Jas. (d. 1819), 36, 110, 120
-, Jas. (d. 1848), 101, 110
-, Jas., & Co., 110, 113

Watts, Isaac, hymn-writer, 243

Webb:
-, Capt. Matt., 152
-, Thos., 31
-, Wm., 31
-, and see Webbe

Webb & Gray, architects, 132

Webbe:
-, Thos. (fl. 1548), 175
-, Thos. (fl. 1576, ? another), 175
-, Thos. (fl. 1602, ? another), 268
-, Wm., 272
-, and see Webb

Webster, Martha (née Baddeley), 99

Wednesbury, 1, 6, 45-6, 51, 62, 143, 217, 244
-, as address, 26, 32, 37, 65, 85, 184, 190, 201, 245-6, 251, 274
-, board of health, 70
-, bridges, 13, 168
-, Broadwaters, 14, 168
-, canals, 14, 168
-, chs., 226-7
-, guild, 27
-, Coll. of Commerce, 83
-, Coll. of Technology, 83
-, the Delves, q.v.
-, educ., 81, 83
-, High Bullen, 63
-, ind., 11, 13, 32, 35, 208
-, man., 7, 32
-, mill, 6
-, Moxley, q.v.
-, newspapers, 72-3
-, parl. constituency, 46, 50
-, Prot. nonconf., 63-5, 68, 172
-, public services, 47 n, 49-50, 221 n, 225
-, public transport, 49-50
-, rds., 11
-, town clerk, 21
-, Wednesbury Recreation Society, 74
-, Wood Green, q.v.

Wednesfield (in St. Peter's, Wolverhampton), 53 n, 194, 217, 227

weighing-machines, manufacture of, 36-7, 113-14

Weldless Tubes Ltd., 114

Weller & Proud, architects, 34, 72

Wellington (Salop.), see Dawley

Wenlock, Much (Salop.), see Spoon- hill

Wennington:
-, Hen., 202
-, W. V., 202

Weoley Castle, see Northfield

Wergs, the (in Tettenhall), 103, 193

Wesley:
-, Chas., 63, 244
-, John, 63-4, 244

Wesleyan Methodist Conference, 4

West Bromwich, see Bromwich, West

West Bromwich Albion Football Club, 10, 74, 98

West Bromwich Colliery Co., 41

West Bromwich District Nursing Association, 86

West Indians, 3, 5, 59
-, Jamaicans, 3, 88, 145

West Midlands College of Education, 154-5, 266

West Midlands Family Planning Association, 48

West Midlands Gas Board, 49, 122, 225

West Midlands Joint Electricity Authority, 49, 225

West Midlands Passenger Transport Executive, 50, 225

West Midlands Police Authority, 224

West Midlands Press Ltd., 73, 135, 253

West Smethwick, see Smethwick, West Smethwick

Weston, — (fl. mid 19th cent.), 37

Weston & Grice, 37, 113

Weston-under-Lizard, 247

Whateley (Whately):
-, G. W., 208
-, Hen. (fl. 1775), 189
-, Hen. (fl. 1799, ? the same), 274
-, Hen. Pyddocke, 100
-, John, 100

Wheaton Aston (in Lapley), 229

whip-thongs, manufacture of, 204

Whitall:
-, Geo., 189
-, fam., 186

Whitehouse:
-, Edna, see Ridyard
-, Elisha, 42
-, Geo., 42
-, Jos., 24
-, P. (née Yates), 179
-, Sam., architect, 235
-, Wm. (fl. 1812), 35
-, Wm. (fl. 1841), 68

Whitgreave:
-, Geo., 22
-, John, 191
-, Thos., 22

Whittingham, Revd. John, 256

Whittington (in Kinver), Hall, 176

Whittlebury, Rob., and his w. Anne, 173

Whorwood:
-, Ann, w. of Sir Wm., 54, 60
-, Brome, 18, 29, 33, 44, 102
-, Field, 54
-, John, 18
-, Rob., 18
-, Sir Thos., 18
-, Thos., 60
-, Thos. Brome, 18, 60
-, Sir Wm., 18, 22, 26, 29, 43, 60, 84
-, fam., 29, 32, 43, 51, 54

Whyley:
-, Ann, 25
-, Jane, see Edwards
-, Wm. (d. 1800), 25-6, 68
-, Wm. (d. 1806), 25

Wiggin:
-, Hen., & Co. Ltd., 117
-, J. & J., Ltd., 201, 248
-, Job, 83
-, Job, his s., 83
-, Sam, 249 n

Wigginton, W., architect, 122

Wigmore, see Bromwich, West

Wigston Parva (in Claybrooke, Leics.), 101

Wilbraham:
-, Eliz., w. of Sir Thos. (d. 1692), 170, 185
-, Mary, m. Ric. Newport, earl of Bradford, 170, 185
-, Ric. (d. 1558), 170, 226
-, Sir Ric., 170, 187, 214-15, 279
-, Sir Rog., 209
-, Thos. (d. 1558), 170, 226
-, Thos. (d. 1610), 170, 185, 214
-, Sir Thos. (d. 1660), 170
-, Sir Thos. (d. 1692), 170, 186, 247

Wilkes (Wylkes):
-, John (d. probably 1533), 34
-, John (fl. c. 1904), 165
-, Ric., 172
-, Wm., 184
-, and see Flaxall Wilks

Wilkinson:
-, John, 191
-, Sam., town clerk of Walsall, 154

Wilks, Sam., 195, 211 and see Wilkes

Willenhall (in St. Peter's, Wolverhampton), 53 n, 67, 217, 225, 254, 261

Willes:
-, Revd. John, 102
-, John, his s., 102, 108

Willett:
-, Eliza, w. of Hen. Goodrich, 101-2
-, Frederic, vicar of All Saints', West Bromwich, 52-4
-, Capt. H. J., 102
-, Hen. Goodrich, 101-2
-, Mary, see Bagnall

William fitz Ansculf, 14

William, monk of Sandwell priory, 51

William the reeve, 155

Williams:
-, Hugh, Independent minister, 68
-, Revd. John, 123
-, Phil., 193
-, Phil., & Co. (later Philip Williams & Sons and Williams Bros.), 8, 39, 193

Willoughby:
-, Sir Fra., 190
-, Percival, 190

Wilson, Rob., vicar of Walsall, 227

Wiltshire, see Calstone Wellington

Windle:
-, Chas., 200
-, Mary Jesson, 275

Winson Green (in Birmingham), 102

Withers:
-, Clarice (née Hammond), 86
-, Jas., architect, 68
-, Jos., & Sons Ltd., 201

Withers (Walsall) Ltd., 201

Witton, Ric., Presbyterian minister, 63, 67-8, 83

Wollaston:
-, John (d. 1634), 185 and n, 186 n, 267, 271
-, John (d. c. 1670), 272
-, Thos. (d. 1580), 174
-, Thos. (d. 1657), 272

Wolsey, Thos., Cardinal, 15, 18, 51

Wolverhampton, 217, 272
-, as address, 32, 34, 127-8, 172, 174, 237-40
-, Bentley, q.v.
-, Bilston, q.v.
-, ch., 239
-, clergy, 247
-, corp., 266
-, educ., 264
-, Featherstone, q.v.
-, Hatherton, q.v.
-, Hilton, q.v.
-, Hosp. for Women, 274
-, Pelsall, q.v.
-, rds., 96, 165
-, Rom. Cath., 240
-, trade, 187
-, Wednesfield, q.v.
-, Willenhall, q.v.

Wolverhampton & Walsall Railway, 169

Wolverhampton Metal Co. Ltd., 194

Wolverhampton, Walsall & Midland Junction Railway, 169

Wolvershill (in Bulkington, Warws.), 175

Wombourn, chantry of St. Mary, 180

Wood:
-, John, 176
-, Rob. Myers, 174
-, Sam. (fl. 1813), 192
-, Sam. (fl. 1840s), 176
-, T. Spencer, architect, 83

Wood & Kendrick, architects, 25, 46, 55, 58-9, 82

Wood End, see Walsall

Wood Green (in Wednesbury), 59, 239

Woodhey (in Faddiley, Ches.), 170

Woodman (Wodemon):
-, Hugh, 32
-, John s. of Nic., 173

Woodsome Hall, see Almondbury

Woodward:
-, Ric., 196
-, Sim., 173

Woolwich (Kent), Arsenal, 149

Worcester, 67, 183, 233, 240
-, bps. of, see Alcock Simon
-, priory, 26, 50-1

Worcestershire, 31 and n, 96, 136, 188 and see Arley, Upper Bromsgrove Dudley Grafton Manor Hagley Halesowen Kidderminster Northfield Norton, King's Offenham Oldbury Ribbesford Stourbridge Swinford, Old Warley Yardley

World Wars:
-, First, 5, 38, 50, 62, 76, 80, 118, 156, 158-9, 197, 202, 221
-, Second, 6, 136, 154
-, and see air raids

Worthington:
-, John, 190
-, Ric., 192

Wright:
-, D. P., 134
-, E. T., 202
-, G., architect, 249
-, H. B., 202
-, John, 33, 38, 184
-, Ric., 38 n

Wright Bros. & Co. Ltd., 202

Wyatt:
-, Benj., architect, 250
-, Benj. (? the same), 235

Wychnor (in Tatenhill), 14, 168

Wydevill, Ant., Earl Rivers, 229

Wykes (or Wilkes), Agnes, see Flaxall

Wyrley and Essington Canal, 168, 186, 189, 193, 201, 207, 278, 281

Y.M.C.A., see Bromwich, West

Yardley (formerly Worcs., later Birmingham), 179, 271, 273 and see Greet

Yates:
-, Geof., 179
-, Mrs. M. E., 179
-, P., see Whitehouse
-, Wal., 179

Yorkshire, 204
-, East Riding, see Filey
-, North Riding, see Coatham Langthorne
-, West Riding, 195 and see Almondbury Leeds Sheffield Wath upon Dearn


The Top Ten Most Influential Speakers of the Last 50 Years

This will not be a purely factual article, based only on historical sales figures or specific inventions/patents issued, or the number of 5-star reviews or Product of the Year awards received or my personal favorites as far as sound is concerned. It is purely subjective, based on my having been intimately involved in the speaker market—both as a fanatical enthusiast and as a speaker industry professional—since the early 1960s. To my way of thinking, 50+ years entitles me to toss out some opinions and at least have them considered semi-seriously. Not necessarily agreed with, but at least considered.

One other thing up front: This is an American-centric article. This is an article that deals with the 10 most influential speakers to have appeared on the scene in the last half-century in the American hi-fi market. Foreign speakers have been evaluated and included with an eye to how they influenced the direction of the U.S. speaker industry. So for example, if you’re looking for the Rogers LS3/5a on this list, save yourself some time and stop reading now. A great little speaker? Yes. An influence? Yes. A Top 10 Influence All-Time in the American speaker market? Move along nothing to see here.

With that as a backdrop, here are my top 10 picks for the most influential speakers in the Consumer American hi-fi market over the last 50 years.

No. 1: The Original Acoustic Research models, AR-1 through AR-7, 1954-1973

OK, this is kind of a fudge right off the bat because it encompasses at least 6 major product “platforms” and many, many individual models:

  • AR-1, AR-1w, AR-1x
  • AR-2, 2a, 2x, 2ax, “New” 2ax, 5
  • AR-3
  • AR-3a (separate from 3 because both achieved such huge individual sales/acclaim notoriety)
  • AR-4, 4x, 4xa, 6, 7
  • AR-LST, AR-LST/2

All the AR models over this 19-year span could really be considered as embodying the same design philosophy, the same manufacturing approach, the same marketing approach and the same cutting-edge engineering breakthroughs and industry firsts.

The Acoustic Research AR-3a

AR introduced the sealed “acoustic suspension” bass-alignment system to the high-fidelity world, making possible deep, clean, distortion-free bass an order of magnitude better than anything else that existed at the time, in an enclosure 1/8 the size or smaller of the then-best Klipschs and Bozaks of that era.

With AR’s acoustic suspension design, the bookshelf-sized speaker as we still know it today became a reality, paving the way for the commercial success and popularity of two-channel stereo (which was invented in 1958). Two Bozak Concert Grands could hardly have fit in the normal living room of a typical 1962-era suburban home. Two AR-3s? No sweat. And they went deeper in the bass and did it more cleanly than the Bozaks did.

In 1958, AR did something else that all modern speaker manufacturers still owe them for: They introduced the AR-3, a major revamping of the original AR-1 sealed system. Using the same woofer in the same-sized compact enclosure (well under 1.8 cu. ft.), the AR-3 brought forward yet another AR “first”: the industry’s first dome tweeter and dome midrange drivers. How many speakers today use a dome tweeter? The AR-3 was the first.

In terms of smooth, level frequency response, deep bass extension (-3dB @ 35Hz, passive—on its own, not an equalized powered subwoofer), low bass THD (under 1% at a 1-watt drive level, a reasonably loud listening level in the home, all the way down under 30Hz), wide dispersion and unobtrusive size, the AR-3 enjoyed a margin of ascendancy over its competitors that is not only unrivaled in the annals of hi-fi, but may be unequaled in any technical consumer field, ever. Did any camera or ski or television or car ever outperform its competitors by that wide a margin for so long a period of time? The AR-3 was introduced in 1958 it was finally replaced by the even-better AR-3a a decade later, having been widely acclaimed as the best speaker in the industry for all that time. Ten years—a feat absolutely unequalled.

However, the basic AR theme of great bass in compact enclosures probably reached its zenith with the 1964 introduction of the small AR-4, an 8” version of the AR-1 and AR-3’s twelve-inch system, but in an enclosure barely 1/3 the size of the AR-1 and AR-3. 1965 saw the debut of the famous AR-4x with its vastly improved new 2 ½-inch tweeter, resulting in a system that spanned from 55-15kHz at ± 3dB on axis! These smaller AR speakers brought true hi-fidelity sound to hundreds of thousands of people, yet they sounded very similar to their bigger brethren. Like the AR-3 at the high end of the scale, the budget-priced 4x had no real, true competition for years.

AR’s market share in the mid-1960s was an almost unbelievable 32%! One company—AR—had one-third of the entire American speaker market.

In 1971 AR introduced the AR-LST (“Laboratory Standard Transducer”), a 9-driver multi-paneled speaker whose mission was to deliver the widest, flattest frequency response over the broadest possible forward-facing area. Marketed as a professional monitor speaker with precisely-known, extremely-high performance attributes (thus qualifying it, in AR’s view, as a reliable scientific instrument for research and studio applications), the LST nonetheless found its greatest success among well-heeled audiophiles of the day. It is included in this group because it utilized the exact same drive units and crossover componentry as the AR-3a, so it can be considered a logical extension of the basic technology and design approach with which AR dominated the market for those 19 years.

No. 2: The Advents

Henry Kloss was quite the figure in the American speaker business in the 1950s–1960s. After he left KLH, he went on to found Advent Corporation because he wanted to manufacture and market large-screen two-piece television projection systems. In order to produce the cash flow needed for that undertaking, however, he decided to make and sell speakers under the Advent name. This virtual “afterthought” went on to become perhaps the most successful speaker brand of the early-mid 1970s, during the very height of the huge Baby Boom generation college population explosion.

The Large Advent

With typical Kloss directness of purpose, he came out with just two models, simply called the Advent Loudspeaker and the Smaller Advent Loudspeaker. Both were 10” 2-way sealed speakers, using in-house designed and built drivers. They differed mainly in size (the “Large” Advent was a full-sized bookshelf speaker, like the AR-3 or KLH Five) the Smaller Advent was a bit larger and more expensive than the AR-4x, but still much trimmer than the larger Advent. Kloss took the “dealer-as-partner” marketing strategy that he initiated when he was at KLH (he was the “K”) to new heights with Advent. Advent dealers presented and sold their speakers with an almost fanatical, religious zeal. The Advents themselves were certainly worthy of their success, great-sounding speakers that had extraordinary bass response—especially considering their modest price—and represented terrific performance-to-price values. The Advents could be said to have spearheaded the explosion of stereo’s popular jump from the hobbyist-only market of the middle-aged “GE engineer living in Suburbia” during the mid-1960s to the 10-fold market increase of the Baby Boomer college kid/dorm room experience of the 1970s.

As a bonus to the amazing role Advent played in transforming stereo from a 1960s Dad-only hobby to its 1970s mainstream popularity, somehow the idea of two speakers per channel “stacked Large Advents” as a tower, driven as if they were one speaker—achieved legendary audiophile status in the 1970s as well. All the high-end magazines accorded Stacked Advents some kind of mythical quality that couldn’t be explained by “the numbers” or even by Advent’s design personnel. This only added to the Advent lore of the 1970s, a brand reputation and story exceeded by few, if any, products in any field.

No. 3: The Bose Acoustimass AM-5

We’re talking about influence here, not personal sound preference or whether you like a company’s advertising. Please hold all those comments about, “They don’t produce real bass below 60Hz,” or “There’s an acoustic hole between 120-200Hz so big you could drive a Mack Truck through it, because the sats and the sub never meet up,” or, “The sats aren’t a real tweeter and they give up the ghost by 13kHz.”

All of that may be true, but one thing is for sure: It’s all irrelevant.

The Bose Acoustimass AM5

As far as influence is concerned, the Bose AM-5 is tough to top. Recognizing the way people wanted (and didn’t want!) speakers to look in their homes in the 1980s and building upon well-known and well-understood acoustic principles of frequency-dependent directionality, localizability and masking behavior, Bose correctly identified and predicted a fundamental change in the way people wanted to use and interact with speakers in their homes. The dorm room Baby Boomers were all grown up now. They were buying homes. They were starting families. Large Advents on cinder-block stands in a dorm wouldn’t suffice any longer. Now, all of a sudden, appearance mattered as much as, if not more than, great sound. The sub-sat system solved this dilemma and introduced an element of “cool” to the equation: All the sound, including the bass, seemed to come from those diminutive twisty little sat cubes. That became the new “Look at this” factor.

AM-5 sales took off, and the old wooden coffin boxes of yesteryear were left standing in the dust. The age of dominance for the traditional box speaker was over for good. That’s influence for you.

The AM-5 did something else of extraordinary importance: It showed the speaker industry the way to do subwoofer-satellite systems. So-called “good” manufacturers introduced many really excellent-sounding systems, like the Boston Acoustics Sub Sat 6 and 7, and the Cambridge SoundWorks Ensemble systems (Kloss, again!) But even more important than this, the AM-5 showed the industry how a subwoofer-satellite system could make a home theater system feasible and workable in a normal living room. When Dolby Pro Logic multi-channel receivers became available in 1990, home theater would not have been anywhere near as successful and widely accepted by the mainstream buyer if the consumer had to somehow convince his wife to allow five big wooden boxes to be strewn around the living room in a visually-objectionable manner. But a hideaway subwoofer and five small, easy-to-place, barely-visible sats? No problem. The AM-5—for all its acoustic shortcomings—showed the industry how to do it.

At one point in the early 1990s an audio industry research firm reported that the AM-5 held some 30% of the US speaker market. Not Bose as a company. Just the AM-5. That’s the dictionary definition of “influence.”

No. 4: The Bose 901

Again, this article has far less to do with personal taste and audiophile quality and far more to do with influence—speakers that paved new directions, pointed out new possibilities, broke old conventions and made the industry sit up and take notice, knowing that things had changed a bit forever from this point forward.

The Bose 901s.

Considered in that light, the 901 qualifies on all counts. Agree or disagree as you will with Dr. Bose’s premise of so-called “direct vs. reflected sound,” or his use of nine full-range drivers (equalized to reach the low and high frequency extremes) instead of conventional band-limited woofers and tweeters, or even his debatable math that eight rear-facing drivers out of nine meant that exactly 89% of the sound reaching the listeners’ ears was therefore reflected energy (none from the front was?). Did Dr. Bose mean to imply that speakers with all forward-facing drivers delivered 100% direct and therefore no reflected energy? Even extremely wide-dispersion forward-facing speakers like the AR-3a with its domed midrange and tweeter?

No matter. That’s exactly the kind of overly detailed analysis of the 901 that misses the forest for the trees. The 901 was totally unlike anything that preceded it. It was the result of fresh thinking, an entirely new way of conceptualizing the home speaker’s role in delivering a credible illusion of the performance venue into the living room. Prior to the 901, all efforts at improving a speaker’s performance involved technical driver improvements or new bass alignment techniques. The Bose 901 made an attempt to involve the speaker’s actual radiation pattern and its resultant interaction with the domestic listening room into the final equation of lifelike sound in the home. It may or may not have been a valid approach. Some people love the 901 most audiophiles will recite a litany of reasons why they do not like it.

But love it or hate it, the 901 deserves substantial respect for being bold and different, and as a result of Bose’s impressive marketing, for being a commercial success as well. Its success emboldened other companies to try new designs and approaches because the 901 proved that success could come from an unconventional—even controversial—design. Pick your favorite unusual or off-the-beaten-track speaker from the last 30 or 40 years or so. That speaker owes at least part of its start in life to the vision and flat-out nerve that Dr. Bose demonstrated when he produced the 901.

No. 5: The KLH Six, Seventeen, and Five

When Henry Kloss parted ways with AR founder Edgar Villchur in 1957, he founded KLH Corporation, becoming the “K” of the famous tri-lettered name. KLH also utilized the new acoustic suspension bass system in its models, but Henry was a more astute businessperson than was AR’s Villchur and Kloss soon learned how to turn his dealers into true advocates for the company. Kloss arguably pioneered the “dealer-as-partner” business approach in the hi-fi industry and his strategy of controlled/limited distribution among only high quality dealers was a winning approach, as it cemented his dealers’ profitability (and thus their loyalty to KLH) by restricting the cannibalistic “dealer on every corner” technique followed by AR.

The KLH Five

The KLH Six was one of the industry’s all-time best sellers: a mid-sized 10-inch 2-way with an excellent 1 5/8” cone tweeter, both designed and built by KLH in-house. Pleasingly adaptable to all kinds of music, it was neither too forward and mid-rangy, nor too laid back and polite. It was the rough direct competitor to the AR-2 series. The Seventeen was a 10-inch 2-way in a smaller cabinet, the approximate competitor to AR’s 4 series, although the Seventeen was somewhat larger and more expensive. The Five was a 12-inch 3-way with dual cone midrange drivers, a very solid speaker that served as KLH’s answer to the AR-3 and AR-3a. Together, these three speakers were the heart and backbone of KLH’s very successful 1960s decade and KLH was clearly a major speaker force to be reckoned with because of these models.

See also:

About the author:

Steve Feinstein is a long-time consumer electronics professional, with extended tenures at Panasonic, Boston Acoustics and Atlantic Technology. He has authored historical and educational articles for us as well as occasional loudspeaker reviews.

Confused about what AV Gear to buy or how to set it up? Join our Exclusive Audioholics E-Book Membership Program!

Recent Forum Posts:

Kingnoob, post: 1452503, member: 89775
Must been in bad shape or worn out Bose speakers to just give them away . I’m sure you could had sold them for a decent amount to someone..
Way better then there cube speakers .
Still cool story never thought anyone built those speakers themselves..

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Glad you enjoyed my little story of my diy 901s. Our project happened over 50 years ago and I still remember it with great pleasure. It was huge fun. Not to mention all the money it saved me.

I gave one pair to my boyfriend at the time, around 1990 maybe. . I gave the other pair to my husband’s son and family, probably around 2003. When I gave them away they were perfect. No sign of wear and tear but still plain clad in the plain old particle board, though it was MDF particle board which is quite nice looking. I’ve no idea what’s become of either of the pairs. But I don’t really care anymore. I love my Quads.

Echolane, post: 1451995, member: 85437
I was both surprised and pleased to see Bose 901s on your list. They were the first speakers of any kind that I owned and I thought they sounded great! No wonder, as I had them paired with a Pioneer SX-1050 at 120 wpc. The SX-1050 was my first stereo system purchase and I will add that I still own that Pioneer and recently dragged it out of the closet where it had been stored for about 30 years and it sounded so good I had it refurbished and it is now the star player in my TV system stereo.

But there’s a story to my Bose speakers and I hope you will enjoy reading it. It was 1977 and I had just purchased my first stereo gear, the already mentioned Pioneer SX-1050 Stereo Receiver and I needed some speakers. Luckily for me I happened to learn of a group of about 10 people at my company who wanted to make their own Bose 901s. They had engineering blueprints of the speakers and equalizer. One of the ME engineers at the company had taken apart the speakers and the equalizer, drawn up exact specs for both, including a parts list which included names of the companies that Bose used to acquire parts for manufacturing the speakers. I leapt at the chance and my brother and I joined the group. I was the only female.

We borrowed some machinery in the company fab shop where I worked and programmed it to cut the particle board to the exact sizes needed and then to make the many double stepped circular cuts to fit the speakers properly. There were 10 of us making 13 pairs of speakers. That meant we cut 234 holes for speakers! We were chided about the particle board dust that had settled everywhere in spite of our best efforts to clean up after ourselves!

We spent the next weekend gluing our speaker cabinets together and setting the speakers in and wiring them. The following weekend we put the equalizers together. I took two pairs of speakers home with the intention of fitting them with beautiful hardware veneer and selling the second pair, but it never happened. The plain particle speakers graced my living room for more than ten years. I thought they sounded terrific. After all, they were paired with the powerful 120 wpc Pioneer and could handle all the power with ease.

The speakers were finally displaced by my purchase of Quad ESL-63 electrostatic speakers and Quad amp and preamp. The speakers hung out in my garage until about 2000 when I gave them away. The Pioneer went in my closet for about 30 years until I took it out several years ago to use in my TV system. I liked it so much I had it refurbished and it is now running the audio side of my TV system. I wouldn’t dream of giving house room to those Bose speakers again but they did serve me well and I had a terrific time making them.

. If your speaker list weren’t limited to just American made speakers, the Quad speakers would surely make the list of most impactful speakers.

Must been in bad shape or worn out Bose speakers to just give them away . I’m sure you could had sold them for a decent amount to someone..
Way better then there cube speakers .
Still cool story never thought anyone built those speakers themselves..

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I was both surprised and pleased to see Bose 901s on your list. They were the first speakers of any kind that I owned and I thought they sounded great! No wonder, as I had them paired with a Pioneer SX-1050 at 120 wpc. The SX-1050 was my first stereo system purchase and I will add that I still own that Pioneer and recently dragged it out of the closet where it had been stored for about 30 years and it sounded so good I had it refurbished and it is now the star player in my TV system stereo.

But there’s a story to my Bose speakers because they were DIY and I hope you will enjoy reading about how it was done. It was 1977 and I had just purchased my first stereo gear, the already mentioned Pioneer SX-1050 Stereo Receiver and I needed some speakers. Luckily for me I happened to learn of a group of about 10 people at my company who wanted to make their own Bose 901s. They had engineering blueprints of the speakers and equalizer. One of the ME engineers at the company had taken apart the speakers and the equalizer, drawn up exact specs for both, including a parts list which included names of the companies that Bose used to acquire parts for manufacturing the speakers. I leapt at the chance and my brother and I joined the group. I was the only female.

We borrowed some machinery in the company fab shop where I worked and programmed it to cut the MDF particle board to the exact sizes needed and then to make the many double stepped circular cuts to fit the speakers properly. There were 10 of us making 13 pairs of speakers. That meant we cut 234 holes for speakers! We were chided about the particle board dust that had settled everywhere in spite of our best efforts to clean up after ourselves!

We spent the next weekend gluing our speaker cabinets together and setting the speakers in and wiring them. The following weekend we put the equalizers together. I took two pairs of speakers home with the intention of fitting them with beautiful hardwood veneer and selling the second pair, but it never happened. The plain particle speakers, thankfully MDF and not regular particle board, graced my living room for more than ten years. I thought they sounded terrific. After all, they were paired with the powerful 120 wpc Pioneer and could handle all the power with ease.

The speakers were finally displaced by my purchase of Quad ESL-63 electrostatic speakers and Quad amp and preamp. The speakers hung out in my garage until about 2000 when I gave them away. The Pioneer went in my closet for about 30 years until I took it out several years ago to use in my TV system. I liked it so much I had it refurbished and it is now running the audio side of my TV system. I wouldn’t dream of giving house room to those Bose speakers again but they did serve me well and I had a terrific time making them.

. If your speaker list weren’t limited to just American made speakers, the Quad speakers would surely make the list of most impactful speakers.

AcuDefTechGuy, post: 1065568, member: 26997
I would agree with the B&W 800D & 802D because their street prices (especially used) is &ldquoaffordable&rdquo and they look amazing and sound pretty good.

The other group of speakers I find to be most influential are the towers with built-in LFE subs like Def Tech, Golden-Ear, RBH, etc.


Each DiedInHouse.com Report Includes:


8 July 1908

8 July 1908: Thérèse Peltier (1873–1926) was the first woman to fly as a passenger aboard an airplane when she accompanied her friend, Ferdinand Léon Delagrange, aboard his Voisin biplane on a 200 meter (218 yards) flight at Milan, Italy.

She was taught to fly by Delagrange and in September 1908 made a solo flight at Turin.

Thérèse Peltier at Issy-les-Moulineaux, 17 September 1908. (Bibliothèque nationale de France)

The airplane was the first Voisin airplane, known as the Voisin-Delagrange I. It was built by Apparelles d’Aviation Les Frères Voisin, at Billancourt, France. It was a biplane with its elevator forward in a canard configuration and a “box-kite”-style rear stabilizer. The wings each had a span of 10 meters (32.8 feet) and a chord of 2 meters (6.56 feet). Its gross weight was 1,540 pounds (699 kilograms).

The airplane was powered by a steam-cooled, direct-injected, 493.41 cubic-inch (8.086 liter) Société Antoinette 8V 90° V-8 engine producing 49.2 horsepower at 1,100 r.p.m. The direct-drive engine turned a two-bladed, fixed-pitch propeller with a diameter of 7 feet, 6 inches (2.286 meters) in a pusher configuration. The Antoinette V-8 weighed 265 pounds (120 kilograms).

The Voisin-Delagrange I had a maximum speed of 45 miles per hour (72 kilometers per hour).

After her friend, Léon Delagrange, was killed 4 January 1910 when the wing of his Blériot XI failed near Croix d’Hins, Peltier never flew again.

Léon Delagrange’s Voisin biplane in flight, 6 September 1908. (J. Theodoresco, Paris)


Records of United States Regular Army Mobile Units, 1821-1942

Finding Aids: Sarah Powell and Randall Roots, comps., "Preliminary Inventory of the Records of United States Regular Army Mobile Units, 1821-1942," NM 93 (1970) supplement in National Archives microfiche edition of preliminary inventories.

Related Records: Records of U.S. Army Commands, 1784-1821, RG 98.
Records of the Chiefs of Arms, RG 177.
Records of U.S. Army Coast Artillery Districts and Defenses, 1901-1942, RG 392. Records of U.S. Army Continental Commands, 1821-1920, RG 393.

391.2 RECORDS OF THE ARTILLERY
1821-1943
1,607 lin. ft.

391.2.1 Records of the 1st-7th Artillery Regiments

History: Four artillery regiments were formed out of the existing Corps of Artillery and Regiment of Light Artillery, June 1821, in accordance with the act reducing the size of the army (3 Stat. 615), March 2, 1821. Fifth regiment organized, May 4, 1861, and confirmed by an act of July 29, 1861 (12 Stat. 279). Two additional regiments of artillery (6th and 7th) organized under an act of March 8, 1898 (30 Stat. 261). Artillery Corps, consisting of field and coast artillery branches, established by General Order 9, War Department, February 6, 1901, pursuant to the Army Reorganization Act (31 Stat. 748), February 2, 1901, which provided an authorized strength of 30 field artillery batteries and 130 coast artillery companies. The existing regiments were divided into 82 coast artillery companies and 16 field artillery batteries by General Order 15, War Department, February 13, 1901.

Textual Records: Regimental and battery records, including letters sent and received, issuances, muster rolls, returns, and descriptive books, of the 1st-4th Artillery Regiments, 1821-1901 5th Artillery Regiment, 1830-1901 6th Artillery Regiment, 1898- 1901 and 7th Artillery Regiment, 1898-1901. Letters received and orders issued by the Astor Battery, 1898.

391.2.2 Records of field artillery units

History: Fourteen field artillery batteries created from 1st-7th Artillery Regiments by General Order 15, War Department, February 13, 1901. A total of 16 additional batteries were organized by General Orders 78 and 116, War Department, June 6 and September 3, 1901. Batteries organized into 13 battalions by General Order 152, War Department, September 15, 1904. Reorganized into six regiments, effective July 1, 1908, by General Order 24, War Department, February 2, 1907, implementing the act of January 25, 1907 (34 Stat. 861), establishing a separate Coast Artillery Corps (CAC).

Textual Records: Records, including letters sent, registers of letters received, general correspondence, issuances, muster rolls, returns, rosters, descriptive books, and histories, of the 6th, 7th, 9th, and 10th Field Artillery Battalions, 1901-7 the Provisional Battalion, Fort Leavenworth, KS, 1904-5 the 3d, 4th, 8th, 13th, 26th, and 28th Field Artillery Batteries, 1901-7 and the 1st, 2d, 3d, and 5th Field Artillery Regiments, 1907-16. Muster rolls of the 4th Field Artillery Regiment, 1911.

391.2.3 Records of coast artillery companies

History: Eighty-two coast artillery companies created from 1st- 7th Artillery Regiments by General Order 15, War Department, February 13, 1901. A total of 44 additional companies were organized by General Orders 25, 78, 101, 108, and 131, War Department, February 28, June 6, August 2, August 14, and October 7, 1901. CAC, consisting of 1st-170th Coast Artillery Companies, established as a separate combat arm, effective July 1, 1908, by General Order 24, War Department, February 2, 1907, implementing an act of January 25, 1907 (34 Stat. 861). Companies were redesignated in separate numerical sequences for each coast artillery fort by General Order 31, War Department, July 24, 1916.

Textual Records: Correspondence, issuances, returns, muster rolls, and descriptive lists of the 6th, 10th, 13th, 15th, 19th, 20th, 23d, 25th, 26th, 30th-35th, 37th, 42d, 44th, 47th, 55th- 57th, 61st, 62d, 69th, 70th, 74th, 76th, 78th, 79th, 81st, 88th, 90th, 93d, 96th, 100th, 104th, 106th, 111th, 112th, 114th, 115th, 127th, 137th, 149th, 152d, 154th, 160th, 161st, and 166th Coast Artillery Companies, 1901-16. Correspondence and issuances of the 1st Provisional Regiment, composed of coast artillery companies in the Department of the East, March-June 1911.

391.2.4 Records of field artillery regiments (1916-43)

Textual Records: Records of the 1st-351st Field Artillery Regiments, 1916-21 (886 ft.). Records of the 1st, 5th-14th, 17th- 19th, 21st, 25th, 36th, 68th, 70th, 71st, 76th, 77th, 79th, 80th, 83d, 306th, 331st, and 349th Field Artillery Regiments, 1921-43. Returns and rosters of the 1st-83d Field Artillery Regiments, 1917-21.

391.2.5 Records of coast artillery units (1916-39)

History: Coast artillery companies renumbered separately for each Coast Defense Command by General Order 98, War Department, July 26, 1917. Additional coast artillery companies organized, by General Order 21, War Department, May 18, 1922, from the residual elements of composite artillery regiments (cavalry, infantry, and coast artillery) that had been established by General Order 115, War Department, August 29, 1917, and substantially demobilized by 1919. By General Order 8, War Department, February 27, 1924, companies redesignated batteries and organized into 1st-16th and 65th CAC Regiments, to which were added the 41st, 60th, and 61st- 63d CAC Regiments, formed by redesignation of artillery battalions bearing the same numbers.

Textual Records: Records of Coast Defense Command coast artillery companies, 1916-21 (105 ft.). Records of the 1st-75th Coast Artillery Corps Regiments, 1916-34 (237 ft.). Records of the 1st, 5th, 6th, 8th-11th, 13th, 15th, 16th, 51st, 53d, 61st-65th, 68th, 69th, 206th, and 895th Coast Artillery Regiments, 1922-39. Records of Coast Artillery Corps regimental bands, 1907-21. Records of the 1st and 18th Sound Ranging Batteries, 1924-31.

391.2.6 Records of U.S. Army mine planters

History: Army Mine Planter Service established in Coast Artillery Corps by War Department Bulletin 43, July 22, 1918, from mine companies and mine planters, which had been part of the Coast Artillery Corps since 1908.

Textual Records: General correspondence and logbooks of U.S. Army Mine Planters Colonel Albert Todd, 1920-21 Cyrus W. Field, 1908- 20 Brig. Gen. Edmund Kirby, 1920-21 Colonel Garland N. Whistler, 1920-21 General Samuel M. Mills, 1914-22 Major Samuel Ringgold, 1919-22 John P. Story, 1920-21 and General Wallace F. Randolph, 1920-21.

391.3 RECORDS OF THE CAVALRY
1833-1941
259 lin. ft.

391.3.1 Records of the 1st Cavalry Division

Textual Records: Correspondence and other records, 1921-39.

391.3.2 Records of 1st-6th Cavalry Regiments

History: Regiment of dragoons organized, March 1833 designated 1st Regiment of Dragoons, 1836, when the 2d Dragoons (designated the Regiment of Riflemen, March 1843-April 1844) was raised. Regiment of Mounted Riflemen organized, May 1846. Two additional regiments, designated 1st and 2d Cavalry, organized, March 1855. Sixth regiment, designated 3d Cavalry, raised, May 1861, and confirmed by an act of July 29, 1861 (12 Stat. 279). By an act of August 3, 1861 (12 Stat. 289), the 1st and 2d Dragoons, the Mounted Riflemen, and the 1st and 2d Cavalry were redesignated 1st-5th Cavalry Regiments, respectively and the old 3d Cavalry became the new 6th Cavalry.

Textual Records: Regimental, battalion, squadron, troop (company), and detachment records, including letters sent and received, correspondence, issuances, rosters, descriptive books and lists, muster rolls and returns, morning reports, and histories, of the 1st Cavalry Regiment (and 1st Dragoons), 1833- 1916 2d Cavalry Regiment (and 2d Dragoons and Riflemen), 1837, 1907 3d Cavalry Regiment (and Mounted Riflemen), 1846-1918 4th Cavalry Regiment (and 1st Cavalry), 1855-1919 5th Cavalry Regiment (and 2d Cavalry), 1855-1920 and 6th Cavalry Regiment (and 3d Cavalry), 1861-1915. Records of the 4th Cavalry include records of the Powder River Expedition, 1876. Records of the 6th Cavalry include reports and correspondence relating to operations in Tientsin, China, during the Boxer Rebellion, 1900.

391.3.3 Records of the 3d Regiment of Dragoons

History: Raised for service in the Mexican War, February 1847. Disbanded, July 1848.

Textual Records: Letters sent, April 1847-June 1848. Regimental descriptive book, 1847-48. Company descriptive books, 1847.

391.3.4 Records of the 7th-10th Cavalry Regiments

History: Organized under an act of July 28, 1866 (14 Stat. 332), with 10th Cavalry reserved for black enlisted men.

Textual Records: Regimental, battalion, troop (company), and detachment records, including letters sent and received, issuances, muster rolls, descriptive books, and histories, of the 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1866-1917 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1866-1918 9th Cavalry Regiment, 1867-1919 and 10th Cavalry Regiment, 1866- 1918. Records of the 7th Cavalry include records of a detachment on the Yellowstone Expedition, 1873. Records of the 10th Cavalry include a unit diary documenting participation in the Punitive Expedition to Mexico, 1916.

391.3.5 Records of the 11th-15th Cavalry Regiments

History: Organized pursuant to the Army Reorganization Act (31 Stat. 748), February 2, 1901.

Textual Records: Regimental, squadron, and troop (company) records, including letters sent, registers of letters received, issuances, descriptive books, muster rolls and returns, and scrapbooks, of the 11th Cavalry Regiment, 1901-15 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1901-11 13th Cavalry Regiment, 1901-18 14th Cavalry Regiment, 1901-18 and 15th Cavalry Regiment, 1901-12.

391.3.6 Records of cavalry regiments (1916-41)

Textual Records: Records of the 1st-17th, 301st, and 306th Cavalry Regiments, 1916-21 (60 ft.). Records of the 3d-8th, 10th- 12th, 14th, and 121st Cavalry Regiments, 1920-41.

391.4 RECORDS OF THE ENGINEERS
1846-1939
1,076 lin. ft.

History: Company of sappers, miners, and pontoniers authorized under an act of May 15, 1846 (9 Stat. 12), as part of the Corps of Engineers, to which were added three additional companies by an act of August 3, 1861 (12 Stat. 287), and a fifth company, by an act of July 28, 1866 (14 Stat. 332). Organized into Battalion of Engineers by General Order 56, War Department, August 1, 1866. Transferred to line of the army by General Order 36, War Department, March 4, 1899. Increased to three battalions by General Order 22, War Department, February 26, 1901, pursuant to the Army Reorganization Act (31 Stat. 748), February 2, 1901, and organized into three regiments and one company of a mounted battalion by General Order 22, War Department, June 30, 1916.

Textual Records: Battalion and company records, including letters sent and received, correspondence, issuances, descriptive lists, histories, muster rolls, and monthly and field returns, of the 1st Battalion, 1846-1918 2d Battalion, 1901-17 and 3d Battalion, 1901-19. Records of engineer regiments and battalions, 1912-21 (1,000 ft.). Records of the 1st, 3d-7th, 9th-11th, 21st, 27th, 29th, and 70th Engineer Regiments, 1919-39.

391.5 RECORDS OF THE INFANTRY
1815-1942
2,286 lin. ft.

History: Army organized into seven infantry regiments, 1815, with 8th Infantry Regiment added, 1838. Mexican War expansion added eight regiments (designated 9th-16th Infantry), 1847, but these were discontinued, 1848. Two new regiments (9th and 10th) were added, 1855, and nine additional regiments were constituted, May 1861 (11th-19th), and confirmed by an act of July 29, 1861 (14 Stat. 279). In a major expansion under General Order 92, War Department, November 23, 1866, pursuant to an act of July 28, 1866 (14 Stat. 332), 2d and 3d battalions of the existing 11th- 19th Infantry Regiments were designated 20th-37th Infantry Regiments, with four new regiments (38th-41st) to be composed of black enlisted men, and new 42d-45th Infantry Regiments for wounded veterans of the Civil War. Reduced by consolidation to 25 regiments, under General Order 17, War Department, March 15, 1869, with the 24th and 25th constituting the black enlisted force. Expanded to 30 regiments by the Army Reorganization Act (31 Stat. 748), February 2, 1901.

391.5.1 Records of infantry divisions and brigades

Textual Records: General correspondence, record cards, and court- martial records of the 2d Provisional Infantry Division, 1917. General and field orders issued by the 12th Provisional Infantry Division, 1916-17. Records of the 1st-3d, 5th, 7th, 88th, and 103d Infantry Divisions, 1923-40. Records of the 1st, 5th, 6th, 16th, and 21st Infantry Brigades, 1923-39.

391.5.2 Records of infantry regiments raised prior to the Civil
War, except regiments raised exclusively for Mexican War service

Textual Records: Regimental, battalion, company, and detachment records, including letters sent and received, correspondence, general and special orders, descriptive books, returns, and histories, of the 1st Infantry Regiment, 1827-1918 2d Infantry Regiment, 1815-1920 3d Infantry Regiment, 1822-1919 4th Infantry Regiment, 1821-1917 5th Infantry Regiment, 1821-1917 6th Infantry Regiment, 1817-1909 7th Infantry Regiment, 1842- 1914 8th Infantry Regiment, 1838-1917 9th Infantry Regiment, 1862-1904 and 10th Infantry Regiment, 1855-1916.

391.5.3 Records of infantry regiments raised for the Mexican War

Textual Records: Records of the 9th-16th Infantry Regiments, 1847-48, including letters sent, and regimental and company descriptive books.

391.5.4 Records of infantry regiments raised in May 1861

Textual Records: Regimental, battalion, company, and detachment records, including letters sent and received, correspondence, issuances, rosters, casualty and descriptive lists, descriptive books, and histories, of the 11th Infantry Regiment, 1861-69 12th Infantry Regiment, 1861-1912 13th Infantry Regiment, 1861- 1915 14th Infantry Regiment, 1861-1913 15th Infantry Regiment, 1861-1910 16th Infantry Regiment, 1861-69 17th Infantry Regiment, 1861-1913 18th Infantry Regiment, 1861-1917 and 19th Infantry Regiment, 1861-1919.

391.5.5 Records of infantry regiments organized in the army
expansion of 1866

Textual Records: Regimental, battalion, company, and detachment records, including letters sent and received, correspondence, issuances, muster rolls and returns, descriptive books and lists, histories, and morning reports, of the 20th Infantry Regiment, 1866-1915 21st Infantry Regiment, 1861-1915 22d Infantry Regiment, 1865-1915 23d Infantry Regiment, 1861-1918 24th Infantry Regiment, 1861-69 25th Infantry Regiment, 1862-69 26th Infantry Regiment, 1862-69 27th Infantry Regiment, 1861-69 28th Infantry Regiment, 1864-69 29th Infantry Regiment, 1861-69 30th and 31st Infantry Regiments, 1865-69 32d Infantry Regiment, 1865-67 33d Infantry Regiment, 1862-69 34th Infantry Regiment, 1864-69 35th and 36th Infantry Regiments, 1865-69 37th Infantry Regiment, 1862-69 and 38th-45th Infantry Regiments, 1866-69.

391.5.6 Records of infantry regiments organized by consolidation
of existing regiments in 1869

Textual Records: Regimental, battalion, and company records, including letters sent and received, correspondence, issuances, histories, muster rolls and returns, and descriptive books, of the 11th Infantry Regiment, 1869-1910 16th Infantry Regiment, 1869-1919 24th Infantry Regiment, 1869-1916 and 25th Infantry Regiment, 1869-1917.

391.5.7 Records of infantry regiments organized in 1901

Textual Records: Regimental, battalion, and company records, including letters sent, correspondence registers, issuances, and descriptive books and lists, of the 26th Infantry Regiment, 1901- 2, 1914 27th Infantry Regiment, 1901-18 28th Infantry Regiment, 1901-11 29th Infantry Regiment, 1901-14 and 30th Infantry Regiment, 1901-7.

391.5.8 Records of infantry regiments (1916-42)

Textual Records: Records of the 1st-3d Provisional Regiments, 1918-19. Records of the 1st-338th and 559th Infantry Regiments, 1916-21 (1,800 ft.). Records of the 1st, 2d, 5th-8th, 10th-22d, 24th-30th, 33d-35th, 38th, 47th, 65th, 67th, and 341st Infantry Regiments, 1921-42.

391.6 RECORDS OF OTHER UNITS
1847-48, 1867-1941
607 lin. ft.

391.6.1 Records of units organized before World War I

Textual Records: Company descriptive books of the Regiment of U.S. Voltigeurs and Foot Riflemen, 1847-48. Records, including letters sent and received, issuances, and descriptive lists, of Signal Corps companies and detachments, 1867-75, 1902-10. Records, including letters sent and received, muster rolls, descriptive books and lists, and morning reports, of companies and detachments of Indian Scouts, 1872-99. Records, including letters sent and received, general correspondence, issuances, muster rolls, and returns, of the 1st-7th and 12th Philippine Scout Battalions, 1901-14 and 4th, 7th, 9th, 11th, 13th, 32d, 42d, and 51st Philippine Scout Companies, 1901-17. Records of the 1st-5th, 7th-12th, 44th, 101st, 102d, 112th, 301st-379th, 381st- 410th, 412th-417th, 420th, 421st, and 423d Bakery Companies, 1913-22.

391.6.2 Records of units (World War I)

Textual Records: Records of the 301st, 302d, 307th, 308th, 310th, 312th, 313th, 315th-323d, 325th, 326th, 329th-331st, 336th, 340th-342d, and 344th-347th Fire Truck and Hose Companies, 1917- 19. Records of the 301st-343d Guard and Fire Companies, 1918-19. Records of the 1st-3d, 6th, 301st, 303d, 305th-307th, 309th- 315th, 317th-323d, 325th-334th, 349th-354th, 356th, 504th, 510th, 512th, 514th, 529th, and 530th Mobile Laundry Companies, 1918-24. Records of Medical Supply Unit No. 2 and miscellaneous medical and field medical supply depot companies, 1917-18. Records of the 1st, 6th-10th, 12th, 13th, 15th-17th, 19th-25th, 28th-31st, 33d, 34th, 40th, 41st, 43d, 44th, 56th, and 58th-61st Motor Commands, 1918-21. Records of the 301st-313th, 320th-322d, and 327th-329th Motor Repair Units, 1918-20. Records of motor transport companies, 1917-23. Records of the 1st-3d, 6th, 7th, 11th, 18th, 36th, 51st, 55th, 56th, 60th, 63d, 87th, 102d, 103d, 105th, 110th, 118th, 119th, 201st, 398th, 399th, 402d, 411th, 413th- 416th, 418th-421st, 431st-433d, 435th, 442d, 445th-448th, 451st- 456th, 458th, 462d-474th, 495th-497th, 499th-506th, 509th-512th, 533d-548th, 550th, and 571st-576th Motor Truck Companies, 1916- 22. Records of the 13th-145th Ordnance Depot Companies, 1918-19. Records of the 108th Ordnance Depot Company, Camp Sherman, OH, 1918-22. Records of 8th-43d Provisional Ordnance Depot Companies, 1918-19. Records of the 1st-59th Ordnance Guard Companies, 1918- 19. Miscellaneous records of the 1st-4th Ordnance Reinforcement Detachment Companies, 1918. Records of the 301st-304th, 306th, 308th-313th, 315th-318th, 320th, 324th, 325th, 327th, 328th, 330th, 331st, and 333d Auxiliary Remount Depots, 1917-21. Records of the 401st-435th, 437th-439th, 441st-449th, and 551st Reserve Service (Labor) Battalions, 1918-39. Records of the 1st-7th, 10th-14th, 16th, and 21st Salvage Companies, 1918-24. Records of the 1st-21st, 25th, 27th-30th, 32d-37th, 39th-44th, 46th-48th, and 54th-57th (Signal) Service Companies, 1917-33. Records of the 1st-43d and 45th-48th U.S. Guard Battalions, 1917-19.

391.6.3 Records of units (post-World War I)

Textual Records: Records of the 1st and 2d Chemical Regiments, 1934-39. Records of the 1st-7th Clothing and Bath Units, 1920-24. Records of the 1st, 11th, 16th, and 323d Medical Regiments, 1938- 39. Records of the 1st, 3d, 5th, 6th, 8th, and 10th Motorcycle Companies and the 1st and 2d Provisional Motorcycle Companies, 1920-30. Records of the 1st, 2d, 9th, 10th, 72d, and 73d Ordnance Companies, 1925-39. Records of the 19th, 80th, 82d, 84th, 87th, 89th, 92d, 93d, and 97th-100th Motor Repair Sections, 1919-23. Records of the 10th Ordnance Service Company, 1937-39. Records of the 1st-28th Ordnance Supply Companies, 1918-19. Records of the 3d, 54th, 55th, and 71st Quartermaster Regiments, 1923-39. Records of the 1st, 3d, 7th, 18th, and 51st Signal Companies, 1924-39. Records of the 3d Signal Service Company, Boston, MA, 1929-41. Records of Special Troops, Hawaiian Division, 1922-23. Records of the 2d, 17th, and 18th Tank Battalions, 1921-31 6th Tank Company, 1919-30 11th Tank Company, 1921-22 and 7th and 8th Tank Platoons, 1921-27. Records of the 5th, 20th, 25th, and 26th Wagon Companies, 1920-35.

391.7 CARTOGRAPHIC RECORDS (GENERAL)
1869-1941
76 items

Maps: Road marches, routes between military reservations, and maneuver areas mostly in the western states, made during training exercises by a number of corps and divisions, and infantry, cavalry, and field artillery regiments, 1869-1941.

391.8 STILL PICTURES (GENERAL)
1850-1950
1,605 images

Photographic Prints (1,604 images): Fort Wingate, NM, and views of the southwest, including pueblos and Indians, 1866-80, some by J.K. Hillers, 1879 (FW, JKH 48 images). Philippine Islands and insurgent leaders, 1896-1906 (PI, 60 images). Officers and enlisted men of the 4th, 10th, 15th, 17th, and 19th Infantry Regiments, and the 1st, 2d, 4th-6th, 9th, and 10th Cavalry Regiments, 1850-1950 (IN, CA 1,494 images). Battery C, 144th Field Artillery, California National Guard, 1939 (AR, 1 image). Ben Johnson League baseball team, Junction City, KS, 1939 (M, 1 image).

Paintings (1 image): Watercolor of Alexander Hamilton as a Revolutionary War soldier, Provincial Company, New York Artillery, ca. 1776, by D.W.C. Falls, 1923 (AR).

Bibliographic note: Web version based on Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States. Compiled by Robert B. Matchette et al. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 1995.
3 volumes, 2428 pages.

This Web version is updated from time to time to include records processed since 1995.


John C. McManus

John C. McManus is Curators’ Distinguished Professor of U.S. military history at the Missouri University of Science and Technology (Missouri S&T). This professorship is bestowed by the University of Missouri Board of Curators on the most outstanding scholars in the University of Missouri system. McManus is the first ever Missouri S&T faculty member in the humanities to be named Curators’ Distinguished Professor. As one of the nation’s leading military historians, and the author of thirteen well received books on the topic, he is in frequent demand as a speaker and expert commentator. In addition to dozens of local and national radio programs, he has appeared on Cnn.com, Fox News, C-Span, the Military Channel, the Discovery Channel, the National Geographic Channel, Netflix, the Smithsonian Network, the History Channel and PBS, among others. He also served as historical advisor for the bestselling book and documentary Salinger, the latter of which appeared nationwide in theaters and on PBS’s American Masters Series. During the 2018-2019 academic year, he was in residence at the U.S. Naval Academy as the Leo A. Shifrin Chair of Naval and Military History, a distinguished visiting professorship. His next project is a major two volume history of the U.S. Army in the Pacific/Asia theater during World War II.

John C. McManus is a native of St. Louis. He attended the University of Missouri and earned a degree in sports journalism. After a brief stint in advertising and sports broadcasting, he embarked on a literary and academic career. He earned an M.A. in American history from the University of Missouri and a Ph.D in American history and military history from the University of Tennessee. He participated in the University of Tennessee’s Normandy Scholars program and, in the process, had an opportunity to study the battle first hand at the Normandy battlefields. At Tennessee he served as Assistant Director of the Center for the Study of War and Society, where he helped oversee a major effort to collect the first hand stories of American veterans of World War II. Making extensive use of this material, as well as sources from many other archives, he published two important books, The Deadly Brotherhood: The American Combat Soldier in World War II in 1998, and Deadly Sky: The American Combat Airman in World War II in 2000. Shortly after the publication of Deadly Sky he accepted a position as Assistant Professor of U.S. Military History at the Missouri University of Science and Technology (at the time known as University of Missouri-Rolla) where he now teaches courses on the Civil War, World War II, Vietnam, American Military History, and the American Combat Experience in the 20th Century. He is on the editorial advisory board for World War II magazine and Global War Studies.

In 2004 he published a two volume series on the American role in the Battle of Normandy. The first book, The Americans at D-Day: The American Experience at the Normandy Invasion was released in June 2004. The second book, The Americans at Normandy: The Summer of 1944, the American War from the Beaches to Falaise was published in November 2004.

In 2007-2008 he published four new books. Alamo in the Ardennes : The Untold Story of the American Soldiers who made the Defense of Bastogne Possible (John Wiley and Sons, March 2007) is a fast paced, graphic history of the desperate race for the key town of Bastogne in the early days of the Battle of the Bulge. The book won the Missouri Conference on History Best Book Award and NAL quickly acquired the paperback rights. The 7th Infantry: Combat in an Age of Terror, Korea through the Present , (TOR-Forge, May 2008) was the first of two gritty volumes covering the history of one of the U.S. Army’s most distinguished combat outfits. The second volume on the earlier part of the regiment’s history, American Courage, American Carnage: The 7th Infantry Regiment and the Story of America’s Combat Experience, 1812 through World War II (TOR-Forge) was published in 2008. In the fall of 2007, McManus published U.S. Military History for Dummies , (John Wiley and Sons), a lively, down-to-earth overview of the American military experience.

In 2010 Grunts: The American Infantry Combat Experience, World War II through Iraq , (NAL/Penguin), was released to rave reviews and wide acclaim. With well research chapters ranging from the Battles of Guam and Peleliu to urban combat at Aachen and Fallujah, to jungle and counterinsurgent warfare, including a chapter on the 7 th Infantry in Iraq, this book examined the realities of modern American combat like no other before or since. The U.S. Army’s Chief of Staff named the book to the Army’s recommended professional reading list. In addition, the Army has also used Grunts as an important reading selection in the Infantry Basic Officer Leadership Course at Fort Benning, Georgia.

He has since published three more highly acclaimed books: September Hope: The American Side of a Bridge Too Far The Dead and Those About to Die, D-Day: The Big Red One at Omaha Beach and Hell Before Their Very Eyes: American Soldiers Liberate Concentration Camps in Germany, April 1945.


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